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Eye Piece power Help

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#1 c p ron

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 10:52 AM

Greetings one and all,

 

Started to use new to me Meade ETX 105 scope.  This is my first scope ever. Question on the power of the 26mm EP that came with the unit. Focal length of the OTA is 1470mm/26mm=56.5?

 

Last night had short window to try out the unit,was viewing Sirius all came in clear.  Would what I saw be about the same as when I view through 10x50 Binos other then field of view? Does that sound right to everyone.

 

Buy adding a 2x Barlow to the EP that would give me more power 113=larger image of Sirius or other stars? 

 

My other question pertains to the electric focuser that came with the unit but no installed yet.  Are there any pluses or minus to using it?

 

As always thanks for the help


Edited by c p ron, 14 February 2018 - 10:57 AM.


#2 mrowlands

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:22 AM

Yes, the power of your 26mm eyepiece would be about 56.5x.  The power of a 10x50 is 10x, so you can see a lot more with the ETX.  There's not much point in magnifying a star unless it is a close double.  With a 4 inch scope if you go more than 150x you might have  a problem seeing through "floaters" in your eyeball.  150x would be great on planets and the Moon.

 

At any rate, the barlow would be fine with the 26, but I'd also look at a shorter focal length eyepiece as well (sized to use either by itself or with the barlow).

 

I personally don't like electric focusers but they can help to reduce the shaking you might get when you focus by hand.

 

By the way, if you're looking for the "Pup", it is a tough catch!

 

Mike R.


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#3 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:28 AM

Stars, even the closest ones, are so distant that they appear as point sources in amateur telescopes.  

 

Dave Mitsky


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#4 Andynator

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:37 AM

No star that you can view will ever look larger or "bigger" with a telescope. However, you will be able to discern different levels of brightness, as well as color, for some stars.
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#5 c p ron

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:42 AM

Thanks everyone 

 

No star that you can view will ever look larger or "bigger" with a telescope. However, you will be able to discern different levels of brightness, as well as color, for some stars.

That helps me understand what I viewed last nightwaytogo.gif



#6 Jeff Struve

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:45 AM

Any easy thing to check out in the field to see what your eyepieces are doing for you are globular star clusters...



#7 HarryRik9

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:09 PM

Usually the first difficulty that beginners have is to understand exactly what a telescope does and how it works. That is why it is probably best to use your telescope first to look at a distant house or automobile. Doing that will let you learn how the focus works and what magnification is. If you put in different eyepieces you will learn how to refocus and what happens as magnification is increased. The next step is to try and get a good view of the moon. If you have learned how the telescope works you should get good results on the moon. Later you can try DSOs such as the Orion Nebula, but remember that is going to require skill in finding objects in the sky. 


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#8 c p ron

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:56 PM

Usually the first difficulty that beginners have is to understand exactly what a telescope does and how it works. That is why it is probably best to use your telescope first to look at a distant house or automobile. Doing that will let you learn how the focus works and what magnification is. If you put in different eyepieces you will learn how to refocus and what happens as magnification is increased. The next step is to try and get a good view of the moon. If you have learned how the telescope works you should get good results on the moon. Later you can try DSOs such as the Orion Nebula, but remember that is going to require skill in finding objects in the sky. 

 Harry,

 

Thanks I have been doing just that yesterday,Viewing trees,cars and buildings with the two EP that I have.  When the Sky clears I look forward to viewing the Moon and putting to use what you have said.bow.gif

C P Ron 



#9 HarryRik9

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 04:57 PM

Ron, You will learn shortly that it is a good idea to practice during daytime the procedures that you will conduct at night. You should be able to set up and work the sky without tripping over the legs, and not knocking over the telescope, as well as how to focus. Practice changing eyepieces until you can do it in the dark. Learn how the focus control operates. Then how to make other adjustments while in the dark. It is not that easy if you don't practice in the daytime. 


Edited by HarryRik9, 14 February 2018 - 04:58 PM.



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