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What Glatter laser do I have?

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#1 tag1260

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:03 AM

I have a couple of Glatter Laser Collimators and was wondering if he marked the laser itself in any way to tell if it's a 635nm or a 650 nm?  I cannot tell the difference in the two but only one is marked on the bolt case.  They appear to have the same appearance in the laser to my eyes.   Thanks


Edited by tag1260, 14 February 2018 - 11:04 AM.


#2 xiando

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:36 AM

the 635nm laser is, afaikm, a more powerful laser. There should be a standard laser warning tag sticker on the top of the laser near the switch that when examined carefully has the wavelength printed on it.

 

   glatter-laser1.jpg


Edited by xiando, 14 February 2018 - 11:58 AM.

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#3 Richard O'Neill

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:39 AM

It's relatively simple and easy to measure the wavelength but I'm curious as to why knowing would make a difference?


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#4 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:46 AM

It's relatively simple and easy to measure the wavelength but I'm curious as to why knowing would make a difference?

 

Both lasers should have about the same output. The eye is significantly more sensitive to 635nm light than to 650nm.   The sensitive is dropping rapidly.  The 635nm lasers are designed for larger open truss scope that will be collimated with a fair amount of ambient light present.  

 

spectral-luminous-efficiency-function.jp


 

V' is dark adapted vision.

 

https://light-measur...itivity-of-eye/

 

Jon


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#5 xiando

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 11:52 AM

 

The 635nm lasers are designed for larger open truss scope...

I don't recall seeing any specific OTA design referenced in the adverting blurbs I read when I was investigating my purchase, just their (the 635nm)  usefulness in brighter ambient light levels due to their higher wattage.

 

PS> (not trying to be disagreeable... ) Is that something you gleaned from Howie back when?


Edited by xiando, 14 February 2018 - 12:02 PM.


#6 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:27 PM

 

 

The 635nm lasers are designed for larger open truss scope...

I don't recall seeing any specific OTA design referenced in the adverting blurbs I read when I was investigating my purchase, just their (the 635nm)  usefulness in brighter ambient light levels due to their higher wattage.

 

PS> (not trying to be disagreeable... ) Is that something you gleaned from Howie back when?

 

 

I am not exactly sure where I picked that up, maybe it was when I was discussing the purchase of my 2 inch collimator with Howie about 10 years ago.  I had had my 1.25 inch for a number of years and had just built my 16 inch.  He sent me the 635nm.  

 

I don't see a need for a 635nm  with a closed tube Dob and most of the time, it's too bright.  Howie sent me one the end pieces with the variable brightness built in, I use that all the time for aligning the secondary, even with an open scope.

 

Jon


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#7 xiando

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:38 PM

It makes sense. I bought it because (somewhere) I read that the standard red laser might be insufficient for daytime collimation and didn't want buyer's regret...Also bought the pot (you can see that in the snapshot above) so I could turn it down if working after dark. I wanted the green laser but Don (Starman) didn't have them in stock at the time.



#8 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:43 PM

the 635nm laser is, afaikm, a more powerful laser. There should be a standard laser warning tag sticker on the top of the laser near the switch that when examined carefully has the wavelength printed on it.

 

 

waytogo.gif

 

That was something I didn't know.  

 

They say you're supposed to learn a new fact every day.  I learned mine for the day, now I can go take a nap.. smile.gif

 

The pot is awesome.. 

 

Howie was awesome.. Rest his soul.. 

 

My favorite Howie Glatter story.  I've told it a number of times but I just have to tell it again.. 

 

Some years ago I was scanning the Astromart ads and saw wanted ad looking for a cheap laser collimator.  It turned out the guy was a Physics teacher on the Navajo Reservation and had purchased a 12 inch Lightbridge with his personal funds for the classes and had no money left for a collimator.  Having spent many wonderful nights stargazing on the reservation, I decided I would buy this fellow a Howie Glatter laser as a way of saying thanks.. 

 

I sent an Email to Howie with my story, I was hoping Howie would give me the "Bro Deal" on a laser.  

 

Instead, about 4 days later, a Laser complete with all the Bells and Whistles showed up on my door step with a note asking me to pass it on to the teacher.

 

Jon


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#9 tag1260

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:04 PM

Thanks guys. I looked at that label 100 times and never saw it until I used my trusty magnifying glass. As they say, "Getting older ain't for sissies!!!!!!"    wink.gif wink.gif


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#10 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:12 PM

Thanks guys. I looked at that label 100 times and never saw it until I used my trusty magnifying glass. As they say, "Getting older ain't for sissies!!!!!!"    wink.gif wink.gif

 

So could you read it with a magnifying glass?  What did it say?

 

I didn't need a magnifying glass to read my 1.25 inch, just two pairs of 3.25 diopter reading glasses.  :)  It's a 650nm which is what I thought it was.

 

Jon



#11 tag1260

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:15 PM

I have two of these in 2". One was marked 650-532Nm and the other was a 635 Nm. I actually have a 1.25" that I'm too lazy today to dig out to look at also.

 

Thanks



#12 xiando

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 01:20 PM

Thanks guys. I looked at that label 100 times and never saw it until I used my trusty magnifying glass. As they say, "Getting older ain't for sissies!!!!!!"    wink.gif wink.gif

Lol, exactly as I had to do. Even with the magnifier AND my 3.00 reading glasses it was still hard to make out (trauma related eye problems not age related) 

 

Funny thing is, once I took a pic, it was easy enough... rescale and sharpen is nice.


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#13 havasman

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 02:11 PM

If & when the variable power pots come back, they should be taken advantage of. The effect shrinks the dot size a lot so that much finer discrimination is possible. At least that is true if your mirror is center spotted right in the center inside your ring or other marker. Then you can turn it back up to use w/the Tublug if that's your process.


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#14 Starman1

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 02:52 PM

It makes sense. I bought it because (somewhere) I read that the standard red laser might be insufficient for daytime collimation and didn't want buyer's regret...Also bought the pot (you can see that in the snapshot above) so I could turn it down if working after dark. I wanted the green laser but Don (Starman) didn't have them in stock at the time.

The green is too bright in all conditions.  I can only think it might be useful with a truss tube 32" f/5 with no shroud in bright daylight.

Otherwise, pretty useless, as WAY too bright to use in twilight or at night.

Think about using a green laser pointer at night.  Would you want that inside your scope?

635nm is too bright at night unless a variable power switch is added (they're still yet to come from the new supplier).

That might vary according to focal length.  At 100" focal length, especially with an open "tube", the 635 would be less intense than at 60" in a shrouded scope.


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#15 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 03:05 PM

 

It makes sense. I bought it because (somewhere) I read that the standard red laser might be insufficient for daytime collimation and didn't want buyer's regret...Also bought the pot (you can see that in the snapshot above) so I could turn it down if working after dark. I wanted the green laser but Don (Starman) didn't have them in stock at the time.

The green is too bright in all conditions.  I can only think it might be useful with a truss tube 32" f/5 with no shroud in bright daylight.

Otherwise, pretty useless, as WAY too bright to use in twilight or at night.

Think about using a green laser pointer at night.  Would you want that inside your scope?

635nm is too bright at night unless a variable power switch is added (they're still yet to come from the new supplier).

That might vary according to focal length.  At 100" focal length, especially with an open "tube", the 635 would be less intense than at 60" in a shrouded scope.

 

 

Don:

 

I find the 635 most useful when using the Tublug or Self-Barlow with a larger scope.  I do have the variable power switch and it's very nice.  Before I had it, when adjusting the secondary, I'd try to collimate before sundown or shine a light on the mirror reduce the contrast and see the center marker.

 

Jon



#16 xiando

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Posted 15 February 2018 - 03:07 PM

understood Don. I often do my collimation during the daylight hours and have the potentiometer addon. As Havasman said, it's nice to tune it down for "pinpoint" centering the primary and then bring it back up for use with the tubblug.

 

I liked the idea of green...idk exactly why. I'm sure I had some logic to it at the time, but the 635nm laser is fine.




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