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Celestron Pacific 8 inch SCT, MFG date?

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#1 patrick_g

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:13 AM

I have an old Celestron Pacific 8 inch scope.  I'm curious as to when the name shown on the label changed from Celestron Pacific to just Celestron.  Also, how best to determine the date of manufacture.

 

It is the smooth orange paint version.  I have the latitude adjustable wedge and chrome legged tripod. I also have a matching inverter (painted same color) that runs on 12VDC and produces 120VAC (not good sine wave, more like square wave) with a frequency adjust knob.  By adjusting the frequency knob you can match the movement of an object of interest or as in say Lunar viewing you can vary the freq a little slower and or faster and scan back and forth easier than messing with the mechanical aiming. I have the nice custom fitted foam lined case that holds the scope and some accessories.

 

I haven't used it a lot but intend to use it more.  It makes a nice telephoto lense for my Nikon D-90 DSLR if lack of mobility isn't an issue.  Lately I have gotten curious about its age.  I bought it used at a "scope shop" about 35 +/- years ago.

 

Patrick


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#2 Geo31

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:20 AM

Welcome to CN.  There is a Celestron C8 Registry that should help you pin down the manufacture date.  I know approximately when the change was made away from Celestron Pacific but I know there are people here to do.



#3 rolo

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:28 AM

Serial # ?



#4 apfever

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 10:47 AM

The serial number has the time encoded, and it's not obvious.

The last digit is usually separated by a space and that is the year in the 70's it was made.

If the last digit is a 6 then it would be 1976.

 

The first number is usually also separated by a space and is the quarter of the year it was made.

If the first digit is a 3 then it would be the third quarter of the year (Jul., Aug., Sept.).

 

full serial number or even a picture of the label would be appreciated if not too much of a pain.

People here just like pictures...you know....just look at pictures and turn the pages type...


Edited by apfever, 20 February 2018 - 10:48 AM.

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#5 Kasmos

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 01:39 PM

Also if the fork arms have holes it's a sand cast model and then would likely be first quarter '76 or earlier. I'll go look at my catalogs but I think the name changed to Celestron International in '78.



#6 CHASLX200

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Posted 20 February 2018 - 06:40 PM

Seems they did away with the holes in the forks around 1977.  Kinda like when they went to black around 1984. I am sure some scopes sat at stores for a while and were sold much later and that would confuse many i am sure.


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#7 ScoobyNarita

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 09:03 PM

I have an old Celestron Pacific 8 inch scope.  I'm curious as to when the name shown on the label changed from Celestron Pacific to just Celestron.  Also, how best to determine the date of manufacture.

 

It is the smooth orange paint version.  I have the latitude adjustable wedge and chrome legged tripod. I also have a matching inverter (painted same color) that runs on 12VDC and produces 120VAC (not good sine wave, more like square wave) with a frequency adjust knob.  By adjusting the frequency knob you can match the movement of an object of interest or as in say Lunar viewing you can vary the freq a little slower and or faster and scan back and forth easier than messing with the mechanical aiming. I have the nice custom fitted foam lined case that holds the scope and some accessories.

 

I haven't used it a lot but intend to use it more.  It makes a nice telephoto lense for my Nikon D-90 DSLR if lack of mobility isn't an issue.  Lately I have gotten curious about its age.  I bought it used at a "scope shop" about 35 +/- years ago.

 

Patrick

patrick_g,

 

I suggest you post your C8 specifics to the C8 Registry Forum (Equipment Discussions, Classic Telescopes, Celestron C8 Registry) where there is plenty of information you might use to date your instrument.  Feel free to include photos and details.  Good luck.


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#8 apfever

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Posted 12 April 2018 - 01:07 PM

OP JOINED FEB 20, last online feb 23, starting post is only post made.
I'd say dried up, but still member.

#9 patrick_g

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Posted 08 February 2020 - 04:55 PM

OP JOINED FEB 20, last online feb 23, starting post is only post made.
I'd say dried up, but still member.

I'm ba-ack... 

 

Scope is labeled Celestron Pacific Torrance California.

 

Serial number was overzealously stamped and is the devil to read but I think it is 152450

 

The forks have a series of holes running their length. 

 

In Case.jpg

 

Patrickdelme.jpg

 

I will try the suggested equip site.

 

Patrick


Edited by patrick_g, 08 February 2020 - 04:57 PM.

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#10 jgraham

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Posted 08 February 2020 - 05:39 PM

Wow, that's a beauty!

Enjoy!

#11 G-Tower

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Posted 08 February 2020 - 05:45 PM

Its a first quarte of 1976 model. One of the last sand cast with holes on forks and one of the more desirable models.


Edited by G-Tower, 08 February 2020 - 05:47 PM.

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#12 patrick_g

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Posted 09 February 2020 - 02:14 PM

Thanks for the info.   I have had it a long time, 30 +  years but of course bought it used at a telescope store.  It is the only larger than a spotting scope instrument I have had.  I have spent a few nights in the bed of a pickup cat napping between astrophotography sessions for things like comet Hyakutake .  Nothing fancy, just an Olympus OM-1` on an adapter..  In more recent times I use a Nikon D-90 DSLR. I'm not an astro whiz but I have fun.  Drove to New Mexico in my pickup camper for the 2017 eclipse.  By accident the ground plot of the area of totality went very near my high school alma mater and the town had a few free RV slots with hookups.  Did an overnight out in the high desert (Llano Estacado).  Got  some  good pix and had fun.  

 

Thanks again for the info on my oldy but goody.  44 years and it looks and works as new.  Somewhere I have an old inverter for 12VDC to 110AC with a metal chassis box in matching colors.  It has a knob for freq adjust.

 

Patrick


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#13 orion61

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Posted 09 February 2020 - 11:39 PM

  That is a beautiful scope. If I may make a suggestion, I would seriously consider using that A/C plug but replace the rest of the cord with a modern grounded cord. There are ways to do this with either a longer (GREEN), ground wire connecting to the wedge bolts, or like I did,  drilled and tapped a small hole right beside the plugin on the base, and soldered a small washer on the ground wire. Then used a small thumb screw to ground it. I left my cord on it all the time but this way you will be much safer than on dewy wet grass, and an unprotected ground!

  Our members mean a lot to us around here, and we want you around for awhile!

  As someone else said you have a real gem, it seems as soon as Tom Johnson sold out the optical quality dropped a bit, well, more like off fliers happened more often and under corrected Spherical Abberation. Also little things like the Aluminum block Secondary holders were replaced by plastic ones, many of which loosened and are spinning around on the corrector. Welcome to CN and the family!

Duane


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#14 John Higbee

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 04:49 AM

Hi! Your C8 is one of the last "sand cast" versions (identifiable by the holes in the fork arms).


The shift to die cast (when the fork arms holes were filled) took place around the end of first quarter 1976...my C8, serial # 256666, which I bought in June 1976, was one of the first with a die cast mount. The optics are superb.


John

Edited by John Higbee, 11 February 2020 - 04:57 AM.


#15 John Higbee

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 04:56 AM

As for the shift from "Celestron Pacific" to "Celestron International", the first recorded appearance of the "International" term was in a catalog dated January 1976, which came with my C8.

My C8 nameplate still used the "Pacific" name. John

#16 G-Tower

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 05:12 PM

Hi! Your C8 is one of the last "sand cast" versions (identifiable by the holes in the fork arms).


The shift to die cast (when the fork arms holes were filled) took place around the end of first quarter 1976...my C8, serial # 256666, which I bought in June 1976, was one of the first with a die cast mount. The optics are superb.


John

That's a second quarter of 1976 model... The best performing C8's are from the time Robert Goff was there...


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#17 CHASLX200

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Posted 11 February 2020 - 06:57 PM

I think it was hit and miss from every year. I had a blow out knock out dead insane sharp 1984 C8 OTA.  My last C8 was made around 2004 and was the worst ever.



#18 patrick_g

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 10:43 AM

Its a first quarte of 1976 model. One of the last sand cast with holes on forks and one of the more desirable models.

Thanks for the decoded info.  I have always thought it was a pretty good scope but  wondered just how old it was. It tracks pretty good, maybe not as precise as some of the newer ones but good enough for my relatively short exposures, especially when powered by the grid (nice steady 60 Hz.)  When operated by its fairly primitive 12VDC to 120 VAC inverter the tracking wanders as the frequency stability of the inverter is mediocre. There is a frequency adjustment knob on the inverter which is used to adjust the tracking rate.  

 

Again, thank you for the information.

 

Patrick




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