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Revolution Imager with Celestron SCT

astrophotography beginner Celestron imaging SCT
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#1 sandconp

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 09:42 PM

I was wondering if anybody is using A Celestron Nexstar Evolution 8 with the Revolution Imager ?

 

Could you comment on the ease of use and quality of the images?

 

 

 


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#2 Brass Hat

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 10:29 PM

I have used the r1 and r2 revolution imager on my old nexstar 8 and my evolution 9.25. It works very well and helps to see a lot of things you cant normally see thru the eyepiece. It was easy to use after I read the how to’s on the web site, of course with anything, their is a small learning curve.


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#3 ShaulaB

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Posted 22 February 2018 - 11:26 PM

Thank you, Brass Hat! I have been chewing on this decision for the past month. Looks like I will go ahead and get it.



#4 barbarosa

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 03:35 PM

I will state without reservation that a ZWO224 or 290 or similar cameras from other vendors and an 85mm refractor or 8" SCT can produce images in real time (not post processed) that are obviously superior to those displayed on the Revolution Imager web site.

 

For traditional imaging and for EAA there are better cameras in terms of  maximum exposure time, sensitivity, resolution and noise. Not that the R2 is a bad camera, the complete kit and the old school video setup works very well for many people. But the R2 is a video camera, a surveillance camera, and not a purpose built astronomy camera. It is not by any stretch a good traditional imaging camera.  If you use a camera like the R2 for DSOs expect oddly shaped stars with black borders, and detail at about the same level as an old standard definition TV. Amazing the first few times, but eventually the blocky stars and smeared colors will pall.  Lots of us started with cameras like the R1 and R2, but most have moved on to more expensive CCD or the increasingly popular CMOS cameras

 

With a CMOS camera and free stacking software, SharpCap's live stack for example, you can use an alt az mount to get remarkably good real time images. You do need a computer with these cameras, they do not have a video output you can connect directly to a display, but the trade off is speed and near HD or better resolution. The ZWO 224 (v1.3) and 290 cameras are good choices as might be the somewhat lower cost models from RisingTech and other sellers.

 

One thing you might do is watch Canadian and American NigtskiesNetwork. The Canadian version is more likely to have Mallincams in use, while the US version, NightskiesNetwork.com will have a greater range of camera types and brands. View as a guest or join and you can ask questions during a broadcast.

 

Of course if the order is already in then you have hours of enjoyable viewing ahead of you.


Edited by barbarosa, 23 February 2018 - 03:40 PM.

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#5 nmoushon

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:00 PM

I moved this thread to EAA fora as it is a much better fit here and will have a better chance of getting fore detailed replies. 



#6 jgraham

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Posted 23 February 2018 - 05:31 PM

Wellll... it depends on your objectives and expectations. I have quite a variety of cameras including the RI2, the RI and ZWO 224, 1600MM Cool, and ASI071MC Pro. For imaging the RI2 is easily at the bottom of the stack, but for simplicity and just pure fun observing I put it way on top. It is soooo nice not having to fiddle with a computer when all I want to do is to observe. I describe my RI2 as my worst camera, but my best eyepiece. :)

 

On the Evo, add a nice focal reducer and enjoy the show! I recently started using my RI2 on an old Meade 10" f/6.3 LX200GPS with the RI2 focal reducer, a combination that brings it all the way down to about f/2.2ish and it is an absolute delight to use.

 

Have fun!


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#7 Phguy65

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:28 AM

I just started with this setup also and am very happy with it. Though I must point out that I spent a great deal of time really figuring out what it is I want to do. I want a good, easy to set-up scope and ability to see DSOs quickly. I also want to do observing beyond eyepiece visual. So the Evo 8 Edge, R2 and Starsense fit what I am looking for.

On a more subjective note. The fisrt night that I had all the equipment working together was one of the most enjoyable of my astronomy saga.
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#8 Ptarmigan

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 11:25 PM

I use Revolution Imager R2 on my C925 on CGEM II mount. I like it a lot. cool.gif waytogo.gif



#9 sandconp

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 06:42 PM

I landed up buying the Revolution Imager for my Celestron Nexstar 8 SE and I am very happy with it except where you cannot go 'down' using the remote. It also took me a while to figure out the correct gain and shutter speeds for day and night time viewing.

 

 



#10 jgraham

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Posted 12 March 2018 - 07:22 PM

I had the same problem with my second RI2 camera. The original had a little simpler remote that could scroll up and down. I found the original remote on Amazon for something like $8-12 (?). I bought two, one as a spare.

 

Enjoy your new camera!


Edited by jgraham, 12 March 2018 - 07:22 PM.


#11 Stargazer3236

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Posted 14 March 2018 - 08:22 AM

I have the Nexstar 8SE, but I use it on my ZEQ25 mount. I use the 0.5FR and get me to 8" f/5. It is a delight to use, especially EAA viewing galaxies, emission nebula and planetary nebula. My polar alignment is usually dead nuts and with a one or two star alignment, I get the object centered in the 2x2 bin FOV every time.

 

I use my RI2  many times, but I also like using my ASI cameras too!


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#12 Hikescdnrckys

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 06:20 PM

I am just starting to experiment with the precursor to the R2, a DSO-1 from AVS. I am having a little bit of trouble with the process and how to connect the various pieces. Can you successful observers help out?

 

I have an Evo 9.25 and am using the DSO-1 with a variable focal reducer set to .5 and inserted into a 2" diagonal, but from all the pictures I am seeing of other setups, it looks like most folks insert the camera directly into the visual back without any diagonal. Am I correct that this is the best route to take with a very small sensor camera on a slow SCT? I also have a Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer which I have seen on other posts is used successfully with another focal reducer.

 

How do you get in focus? Do you start with an eyepiece until you know the object of interest is exactly in the center of the FOV and then swap in the camera, or just use the camera alone. If just camera alone, do you start with a bright star, get it in focus, and then slew to a DSO without changing focus?  

 

Note: I just want to use the LCD monitor without having to rely on other software like Sharpcap etc.



#13 Censustaker

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 06:50 PM

I will focus on a bright star, sometimes using a bahtinov mask. It helps to put the camera into a high-speed high-gain mode when doing this - 1/30 and x1024 sense-up for example



#14 Ptarmigan

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Posted 22 May 2018 - 07:07 PM

I am just starting to experiment with the precursor to the R2, a DSO-1 from AVS. I am having a little bit of trouble with the process and how to connect the various pieces. Can you successful observers help out?

 

I have an Evo 9.25 and am using the DSO-1 with a variable focal reducer set to .5 and inserted into a 2" diagonal, but from all the pictures I am seeing of other setups, it looks like most folks insert the camera directly into the visual back without any diagonal. Am I correct that this is the best route to take with a very small sensor camera on a slow SCT? I also have a Celestron f/6.3 focal reducer which I have seen on other posts is used successfully with another focal reducer.

 

How do you get in focus? Do you start with an eyepiece until you know the object of interest is exactly in the center of the FOV and then swap in the camera, or just use the camera alone. If just camera alone, do you start with a bright star, get it in focus, and then slew to a DSO without changing focus?  

 

Note: I just want to use the LCD monitor without having to rely on other software like Sharpcap etc.

I use a bright star to focus with Revolution Imager R2. I do not use Bahtinov mask, but it is very helpful.

 

One can make their own Bahtinov mask.



#15 sandconp

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 10:22 AM

I start with a low magnification eye piece (40MM) and find and object then I put in the R2 camera into the diagonal and re-focus on the object until I see the object on the screen.  I use the .5 focal reducer that comes with the R2 camera.  I am not sure if it makes any difference to put the camera directly into back on the tube or use the Star diagonal.  I asked the question to the Revolution Imager and never really got an answer. 

 

Anybody else have any recommendations if the star diagonal should be used with the Revolution Imager?



#16 diceless

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 02:42 PM

I start with a low magnification eye piece (40MM) and find and object then I put in the R2 camera into the diagonal and re-focus on the object until I see the object on the screen.  I use the .5 focal reducer that comes with the R2 camera.  I am not sure if it makes any difference to put the camera directly into back on the tube or use the Star diagonal.  I asked the question to the Revolution Imager and never really got an answer. 

 

Anybody else have any recommendations if the star diagonal should be used with the Revolution Imager?

Two small effects from the diagonal: slight increase in the focal length of the telescope as the mirror has to be shifted to focus farther back and some mirror chromatic aberrations if you have a prism diagonal.  But really, it doesn't affect the view much with or without it and for some the diagonal is needed to keep the camera from crashing into the base.  Also you should be able to do alignments with just the camera.  The stock red dot finder on the 6se is enough to get the star in the view of a 1/3 sized sensor and I do the fine tuning there.  The last couple of viewing sessions I have not pulled an eyepiece out of the case.




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