Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Strategy for shooting in severe moonlight?

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Rudy Pohl

Rudy Pohl

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 27 Dec 2016
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario Canada

Posted 25 February 2018 - 04:11 PM

We've had almost no clear nights here in Ottawa and tonight is going to be one, however the moon is going to be out nice and bright and right up there among my targets. I'm going out because I need to practice a few shooting techniques to get ready for when we do have some good nights, one being using the Bahtinov mask properly.

 

Since I'm going to be out anyway, I thought I would shoot the Orion Nebula for a while... why not? Anyways, is there any strategy I can use to try to maximize the quality of the image I will get under such severe moonlight, such using very low ISO, short shutter speed, etc., or is it still just the old standard of 1/4 to 1/3 of histogram from the left edge?

 

Thanks,
Rudy



#2 leveye

leveye

    Aurora

  • ***--
  • Posts: 4802
  • Joined: 06 Feb 2013
  • Loc: Central Oregon Coast

Posted 25 February 2018 - 04:38 PM

Go mono and use filters.



#3 Aaron_tragle

Aaron_tragle

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 654
  • Joined: 23 Jul 2017
  • Loc: Richmond, Virginia

Posted 25 February 2018 - 04:46 PM

I just image star clusters during full moon or I test new equipment. Here is an example of what I got friday night under a 50% moon

 

25x30s ISO 400

Beehive Cluster

 

This night was my first-night guiding and I tried my homemade star-spike mask I made with cardstock and tooth floss

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Beehive_Final_Web.jpg

  • okiestarman56 likes this

#4 Gipht

Gipht

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1333
  • Joined: 12 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Prescott Valley, AZ.

Posted 25 February 2018 - 04:47 PM

Last night I  shot Orion with my 10" reflector using short subs, ISO  of 3200, and ended up with about 200 subs which I reduced down to 157 for 18 minutes integration.  The short subs seemed to handle the moonlight pretty well.   Your set up is quite different, but I would try a exposure time  which would  have the running man barely visible in the sub.  With  my setup that was 7 seconds.  The results are:  https://www.cloudyni...en-second-subs/


  • Jim Waters likes this

#5 PETER DREW

PETER DREW

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1049
  • Joined: 31 May 2017

Posted 25 February 2018 - 04:58 PM

Narrowband Ha filter?


  • Jim Waters likes this

#6 17.5Dob

17.5Dob

    Skylab

  • ****-
  • Posts: 4147
  • Joined: 21 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Colorado,USA

Posted 25 February 2018 - 05:01 PM

I wouldn't even try to image any nebula during bright moonlight. If you "have" to get out and test gear, shooting open clusters or globular clusters are the way to go. Also try to image as far away from the moon as possible.



#7 MalVeauX

MalVeauX

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4013
  • Joined: 25 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Florida

Posted 25 February 2018 - 05:09 PM

Heya,

 

I too woulndn't bother with DSO on a moon lit sky.

 

Instead, just image the moon. Or a planet if available.

 

The only way to really image DSO realistically with the moon in the sky is in narrow band.

 

Very best,



#8 Jim Waters

Jim Waters

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1562
  • Joined: 21 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Phoenix, AZ USA

Posted 25 February 2018 - 05:10 PM

Shoot Ha.



#9 Rudy Pohl

Rudy Pohl

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 289
  • Joined: 27 Dec 2016
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario Canada

Posted 25 February 2018 - 05:17 PM

I just image star clusters during full moon or I test new equipment. Here is an example of what I got friday night under a 50% moon

 

25x30s ISO 400

Beehive Cluster

 

This night was my first-night guiding and I tried my homemade star-spike mask I made with cardstock and tooth floss

 

I just image star clusters during full moon or I test new equipment. Here is an example of what I got friday night under a 50% moon

 

25x30s ISO 400

Beehive Cluster

 

This night was my first-night guiding and I tried my homemade star-spike mask I made with cardstock and tooth floss

Great suggestion Aaron, thanks!  I just gave it a quick study in Stellarium and it's location in relation to some other stars and that's what I''ll aim for. I'm new at DSO stuff to so I, like you need to practice my polar alignment and general techniques... taking every available opportrunit.

 

Have fun,

Rudy



#10 ImNewHere

ImNewHere

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1901
  • Joined: 29 Mar 2017
  • Loc: Nashville, IN

Posted 25 February 2018 - 08:51 PM

I wonder how well a CLS filter would work with the moon in the sky.



#11 17.5Dob

17.5Dob

    Skylab

  • ****-
  • Posts: 4147
  • Joined: 21 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Colorado,USA

Posted 25 February 2018 - 09:23 PM

I wonder how well a CLS filter would work with the moon in the sky.

It won't matter at all. Moonlight is broadband light and fills every spectral niche. Even Ha imagining suffers from it.
 


Edited by 17.5Dob, 25 February 2018 - 09:27 PM.


#12 AKHalea

AKHalea

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 775
  • Joined: 17 Jul 2016
  • Loc: Houston, Texas, USA

Posted 26 February 2018 - 09:52 AM

Rudy : Have you tried imaging M45, the seven sisters (The Pleiades)? It is a bright star cluster visible to the naked eye and has some nebulosity around a couple of the stars. If you have not tried that yet, it will be a great target to practice on. It is a bit away from the bright moon and you might be able to get the reflection nebulae with lots of short exposures. 

 

A couple of other target worth trying might be the galaxy pair M81/82 and the Double Cluster NGC 886 & NGC 889. M81/82 is also called the Bode's nebula, but is really a pair of galaxies and they will fit nicely in the 200 to 300mm lens FOV. Both are bright enough that you can get something even with the bright moon. NGC 886 & 889 together fit nicely in the 200-300mm FOV. They are both open clusters of bright stars, so less hampered by the bright moon. 

 

Hope that helps. Cheers ..... Anil




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics