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KL Andromedae

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#1 flt158

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 10:28 AM

I just thought I would take this opportunity to describe my recent experience of observing a completely new carbon star which is also a variable star. Its designation is KL Andromedae. 

Its magnitude varies from 10.4 down to 13.5. 

Having a William Optics 158 mm F/7 apochromatic refractor on a Berlebach Planet altazimuth mount, I had little problem star hopping to KL And from the glorious binary Almach (Gamma Andromedae). In my personal notes, I found KL And a very attractive intense dim orange carbon star with a magnitude of 10.8. This implies that the star is near its brightness at the moment. 

Because Andromeda is getting a little low in the north western sky, I won't be able to estimate its magnitude for very much longer until September or October 2018 at the earliest. 

But perhaps a few other variable star admirers might find the time to observe KL Andromedae before it sinks too low. 

The colour will win you over instantly for sure. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey.  


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#2 fcathell

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 11:21 AM

KL And is an interesting carbon star.  I observed it earlier this winter.  You may want to check out R-Leporis which is also called Hind's Crimson star.  It is in Lepus just below Orion and not that hard to find.  It is almost blood red and reminds me of T-Lyrae.

 

Frank


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#3 flt158

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 12:00 PM

Thank you, Frank, for your advice. 

As a strong follower of carbon stars I do know very well both Hind's Crimson star (R Leporis) and T Lyrae. 

Indeed I have observed 58 carbon stars since December 2000 -15 of them within the borders of Andromeda over the last year and a half. 

I have become an huge fan of very faint carbon stars in very recent times. 

By the way, my wife and I visited Arizona last summer to observe the Total Solar Eclipse amongst the states of Wyoming and Utah.

Many thanks, Frank.

You've got some good scopes too.   

 

Clear skies from Aubrey.   


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#4 jim kuhns

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 01:09 PM

I see you live in Ireland, and know the morning light there is gaining over the next
several months with shorter nights a head, but should be able to check on this variable in the morning around late April as that part of Andromeda should well above your horizon. Will have to take a look at this variable star.

Edited by jim kuhns, 08 March 2018 - 01:10 PM.

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#5 fcathell

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 02:29 PM

I've become interested in carbon stars and unusual double stars in the last couple of years along with my usual planetary observing.  Deep sky was a big thing in the past for me and now I stick to objects where I don't need pitch black skies and can set up at the home observing pad. I spent so much time camping out in the late 70s, 80, and 90s observing and photographing deep sky objects that I just don't miss it any more and have cut back on my scope "size" as a consequence. I've logged a little over a dozen carbon stars in the last year and want to continue. My most used scopes are my 4 and 5 inch Maks.

 

Frank


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#6 flt158

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 06:21 PM

I'm adding another variable carbon star with an unusual designation. 

V 421 Andromedae is extremely faint at present. 

I describe it as an extremely dim red carbon star with a magnitude of +11.3. 

There is an 11.4 magnitude star to its west. 

This is my joint faintest carbon star along with U Lyrae which I observed about 5 years ago. 

V 421 And is the 17th carbon star in Andromeda and my 60th carbon overall. 

I will be giving an estimate on www.aavso.org on Friday 9th March 2018. 

I could barely see it at 40X in my apo. But I did increase the magnification to 112X, 167X and 225X. 

The star is lovely at these latter powers -an almost hidden gem. 

 

Thank you, Frank, Jim and Nite Guy, for your kind compliments. 

 

Aubrey. 




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