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JMI Train-n-track For Voyager

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#1 Dagobert

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 09:49 PM

I recently acquired a JMI Train-n-track For Voyager.  While it was very straight forward to install I would love to read the operating instructions.  Unfortunately I don’t have them and neither does JMI’s website or their new owners - Farpoint Astro.  I’m wondering if anyone out there has a copy they’re willing to share electronically.  I can’t imagine it being more than a couple pages.  It seems rather simple but I’m mainly curious about the steps they prescribe for the “simple 30-second training procedure”.

 Thanks!

3B0DB7F2-9A3A-4713-A70C-4042072518E6.jpeg

 


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#2 TOMDEY

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 10:26 PM

The quick-start answer is that you set the two knobs to center (where the thing doesn't move!). Then, you look into the eyepiece and see what way(s) the target is drifting. Then you (empirically) run the high-speed buttons to see which way(s) that moves the image. Then you turn the knobs to chase the target. You have to wait a while to see whether you are leading or lagging. Depending on how finicky you are, it may take a LOT longer than 30 sec to tune it right where you want. There may also be some backlash... I do that and then occasionally use the High-Speed buttons to tease the object back to center. It is WAY better than just pushing a scope manually... but doesn't approach the finesse of a good equatorial mount! I like it a lot, for solar and lunar. That's really all there is to it, simple and reliable. Great for grab-n-go, where you don't want to be screwing around a lot. It does take some getting used to, before you get ~good at it~  Tom



#3 Dagobert

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Posted 08 March 2018 - 10:54 PM

Tom,

Very grateful for the quick start answer.  I didn’t think there would be much more to it than that but it’s best to engage with new gear at least somewhat informed.  My usage also will be primarily solar with occasional lunar grab and go.  In either case, the ability to study features for minutes at a time uninterrupted is what I’m after so I think it will be a good fit.  For solar, pressure tuning, focusing, and adjusting two slow motion controls  a foot apart keeps me too busy to properly concentrate on observation.  This should address some of that. 

Clear skies,



#4 Dagobert

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Posted 11 March 2018 - 02:10 PM

Had a chance to use this set-up yesterday and I can confirm Tom’s characterizations from his post.  It’s actually quite fun to use and the ability to smoothly adjust object position without disturbing the mount makes it worth the price of admission for me.  Seeing how close you can get the tracking is indeed fun and challenging.  It certainly is a dramatic improvement over the manual slow motion controls.  I’m pretty happy with this grab-n-go solution based on cost, weight, and performance.  I’m going to work with it for solar visual for a bit until I feel I’ve mastered it then I’ll see how it performs to capture some solar video data.  This may very well prove to be beyond its limitations but it’ll be a fun experiment nonetheless.



#5 jcj380

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 11:27 AM

Have you been able to "train" this thing to track objects?

 

It's an intriguing product, but not sure if it would be better to put the $$$ toward a mount upgrade.

 

Thanks.


Edited by jcj380, 06 June 2018 - 11:28 AM.


#6 Dagobert

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 12:17 PM

Training is really a bit of a misnomer.  You adjust the track speed/direction separately in altitude and azimuth to try to keep the object of interest in the FOV.  I can get it to the point where I may only have to re-center after 5 or so minutes.  By this point, I'm so used to the controller and the tweak routine I barely think about it.  What's really nice is there's no dampening time during and after adjustments so you can observe uninterrupted.  I doubt I will use it for solar video capture.  Not enough hands....   But as a grab n' go visual it's a rather good solution when considering load capacity, travel weight, simplicity, price (used) and capabilities.  The LST-100THa  is 13 lbs. in single stack mode.  Inexpensive (<$600)/lightweight alt/az tracking solutions with ample payload capacity to support my scope don't exist so this solution is a fit for me, albeit limited in functionality.  The Orion StarSeeker IV might work but I'm at the absolute upper end capacity-wise which steers me away.  If I could try one first to know how it behaves at max capacity I might chance it.  That not being the case, I pulled this solution together for $300 for mint second hand gear and I'm pretty happy.  At new prices I might be inclined to keep looking.


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