Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Sky Report - What is Your Seeing and Transparency?

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 earlyriser

earlyriser

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1255
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Cincinnati

Posted 23 March 2018 - 05:41 AM

Location: Cincinnati

Time:       2:30-4:00 AM EDT

NELM:     4.5

Seeing:    8

 

I've never experienced seeing as good as it was this morning in southwest Ohio. I feel like I saw Jupiter for the first time. I might be over-rating the seeing a bit due to my lack of experience with steady skies, but at 208X (the highest power eyepiece I had with me), the stars looked like pinpoints in my AD10. Normally, things start to getting fuzzy at 125x where I am, so either the seeing was a lot better than normal, or the mirror gnomes refigured my mirror while I was sleeping.

 

Anybody else out this morning?



#2 TOMDEY

TOMDEY

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2199
  • Joined: 10 Feb 2014
  • Loc: Springwater, NY

Posted 23 March 2018 - 07:37 AM

Here in "upstate" NY, I'm rural hills. SQM usually 21.2, occasionally 21.5. Seeing is often good, transparency usually mid/marginal but occasionally wonderful. That's about it. Think Adarondas. Actually, surprisingly good for the NorthEast.  Tom


  • George N likes this

#3 earlyriser

earlyriser

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1255
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Cincinnati

Posted 25 March 2018 - 05:32 AM

Location: Cincinnati
Time:       5:00 AM EDT
NELM:     4.3
Seeing:    Fair

 

Stars started getting a little soft at 125x this morning. 



#4 REC

REC

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10542
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2010
  • Loc: NC

Posted 25 March 2018 - 02:23 PM

Location: Cincinnati

Time:       2:30-4:00 AM EDT

NELM:     4.5

Seeing:    8

 

I've never experienced seeing as good as it was this morning in southwest Ohio. I feel like I saw Jupiter for the first time. I might be over-rating the seeing a bit due to my lack of experience with steady skies, but at 208X (the highest power eyepiece I had with me), the stars looked like pinpoints in my AD10. Normally, things start to getting fuzzy at 125x where I am, so either the seeing was a lot better than normal, or the mirror gnomes refigured my mirror while I was sleeping.

 

Anybody else out this morning?

Sounds like you had real steady seeing. I assume you where using your 6mm Delos for the 208x. Nice combo and 200x ish is about the sweet spot in my 8" SCT and my AD 10" Dob. In the Dob I use the ES 6.7mm for 186x on the planets, if the seeing is good. I use clear sky chart to get my readings from where I live in NC. In my backyard, 30 miles from a big city, red zone the best I can do is mag.5 stars at Zenith on a very good transparent night. I have read that the best seeing times are usually after 1am til morning.


  • Stardust Dave likes this

#5 earlyriser

earlyriser

    Apollo

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 1255
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2016
  • Loc: Cincinnati

Posted 08 April 2018 - 08:07 AM

Location: Cincinnati

Time:       April 7 21:30 to April 8 01:30 EDT
NELM:     4.0
Seeing:    Good

 

Stars were points most of the time up to my max power of about 208x. Think I'll start carrying the 4.5 mm HD60 with the wide-angle eyepieces I normally use in my AD-10 for nights like this. 


Edited by earlyriser, 08 April 2018 - 08:08 AM.


#6 Feidb

Feidb

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2757
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2009
  • Loc: Nevada

Posted 08 April 2018 - 08:20 PM

Las Vegas

 

Transparency = 0 due to sheetrock, studs, insulation & asphalt shingles.

Seeing = 0 Okay, add water-based paint.

NELM = 0 Due to two 40 watt spiral fluorescent bulbs (two are burned out, I just noticed).

SQM = I don't even know what that is so make up your own number.

Yabba dabba doo = 0 The next number someone comes up with I'll never use when I look up.

 

Okay, seriously, I'm inside and won't be doing any real observing until next week. When I do, I won't be going by any numbers. What I'll do is go by the Clear Sky Clock and local weather. If I actually get out to the site, I'm going to look up. That's it. If it's not windy, cloudy, and the sky isn't mushy, I'm good.



#7 George N

George N

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4942
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 10 April 2018 - 09:58 AM

Here in "upstate" NY, I'm rural hills. SQM usually 21.2, occasionally 21.5. Seeing is often good, transparency usually mid/marginal but occasionally wonderful. That's about it. Think Adarondas. Actually, surprisingly good for the NorthEast.  Tom

 

I need to move to your part of NYS!  At least for the seeing.

 

The 'seeing' I see is generally awful - mostly thanks to the jet stream, but maybe local conditions. You don't see many excellent planetary images coming out of New York.

 

Transparency = variable, with it best in the fall and often low in summer.

 

I observe in a number of places, but -

 

--- rural home, Southern Tier, near Binghamton, SQM = 20.5

 

--- at Kopernik Observatory (NY/PA border area, south of Vestal, NY), SQM = 21.0

 

--- my camp on Indian Lake and the Adirondack Public Observatory (central Adirondacks), SQM = 21.75 or better. At Indian Lake I enjoy a wonderfully low Southern Horizon right over the 16 mile long wilderness lake -  if there are 'light domes' they are hidden behind mountains.

 

I also observe often from Cherry Springs "Dark Sky" Park in PA (not quite 3 hour drive for me). On rare occasions the seeing is excellent, at times the transparency is excellent, late night fog is a problem - SQM = 21.75 or better.



#8 David Knisely

David Knisely

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16920
  • Joined: 19 Apr 2004
  • Loc: southeastern Nebraska

Posted 10 April 2018 - 02:54 PM

I usually don't find the "one to 10" "seeing" scales to be all that useful for me, as I prefer something a little more specific.  Indeed, one problem is that many people confuse true "seeing" with transparency.  For transparency, without an SQM metering system, I generally just use the faintest star I can see nearly overhead with my unaided eye using only averted vision (my "Zenith Limiting Magnitude", or ZLM).  From my home on a good dark night, I can see magnitude 5.0 to 5.4 stars overhead, while out at my regular dark sky site, that number is often from 6.2 to as faint as 6.8.  The faintest I have ever gone was at the Nebraska Star Party a number of years ago when I got down to around 7.8 or so.  Such a method is at least somewhat internally consistent for me, although for comparing between different observers, an SQM reading would be a lot better.  "Seeing" on the other hand is the stability of the atmosphere and is measured in arc seconds.  I often use the appearance of a star's diffraction pattern or closely separated double stars to judge seeing.  Typically from here, it varies from around 0.4 arc seconds at its very best to several arc seconds at worst (typically 1 to 2.5 arc seconds is common).  It also strongly varies with how high you are looking above the horizon.  Clear skies to you.      


Edited by David Knisely, 10 April 2018 - 03:00 PM.


#9 Edd Weninger

Edd Weninger

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1043
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2014

Posted 10 April 2018 - 06:46 PM

Here is some data which will make David happy.  This is seeing measured at the Happy Jack location where the Discovery Telescope was built.  My observatory is about 50 miles from there in similar topography.  I'm confident I have similar seeing.

   

The measurements were done over a 16 month period.  Each measurement was 20 seconds long.

 

Cheers,

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Happy Jack seeing.jpg



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics