Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

"Astroscan 2001 Telescope User's Manual" vs. "Using Your Astroscan"

classic reflector
  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 DLuders

DLuders

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3,890
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Spokane, WA

Posted 25 March 2018 - 06:41 PM

What difference is there between "The Astroscan 2001 Telescope User's Manual" (12 pages) and the "Using Your Astroscan" pamphlet shown below?  The User's Manual shows has a few observing hints; does "Using Your Astroscan" provide more in-depth guidance?  For those who may have it, does anyone know where I can source a copy?  How many pages does it have?  hmm.gif  Any information would be appreciated.

 

Astroscan User Manual Cover.JPG    Using Your Astroscan.JPG



#2 Gil V

Gil V

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,503
  • Joined: 09 Sep 2012

Posted 26 March 2018 - 06:06 PM

Whichever one was printed later cost less per copy to make.

#3 DLuders

DLuders

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3,890
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Spokane, WA

Posted 27 March 2018 - 07:25 AM

In the original post above, the first pamphlet came with an Astroscan 2001 bought on 2/26/1986 for $269.99.  It is Serial Number 8540905 (white sticker) and was "Made in Japan".  The pamphlet itself has "Ninth Printing, Sept. 1985" on the inside cover, and is stock number 711685 Rev. 9/85 (2.5M).  

 

I don't believe that the second, more colorful pamphlet (stock number 31203-04?) is merely a successor to the first pamphlet.  Does anybody know, by comparing the first one (hyperlinked above) to the second one which they may have?  ooo.gif 



#4 apfever

apfever

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,112
  • Joined: 13 May 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 27 March 2018 - 08:16 AM

I'll check, I have a bunch of Astroscan papers in a folder or holder or something...somewhere. I know where the papers are and can get to them, it will be a few hours, later this morning. I still have two, one for nostalgia #721 I think, and one Carton Japan production which has the best optics I've seen in one.

#5 apfever

apfever

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,112
  • Joined: 13 May 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 27 March 2018 - 09:15 PM

Here's part of what I found. There may be more on the Astroscan instructions but that would take some digging time.

Upper Left, black and white is 16 pages dated Sept. 1977
Upper Right, color Richard Berry is 26 pages dated Sept. 1980
Bottom Center, color Edmund User's Manual is 10 pages dated Sept. 1982

Bottom Left is a printed download that I don't have a front or back 'cover' for.
I can't get much more on this one, author is James Mullaney, 28 pages, has a photo credit inside dated 2006.

Attached Thumbnails

  • P3270001.JPG

  • danmdak and mdowns like this

#6 apfever

apfever

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,112
  • Joined: 13 May 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 27 March 2018 - 09:39 PM

It is interesting that the picture on the cover of the 2001 Telescope User's Manual shows the black and white cover of the Upper Right black and white in my photo. that was clear eh?

Look at the left picture in Post #1. There are three booklets under the scope. On the bottom, under the scope base leg, is the 16 page black and white I have.


Both the color Richard Berry manual and the Astroscan 2001 Edmund manual are entirely different.
The 'Astroscan 2001' has much better technical detail of the scope.
The 'Using Your Astroscan' by Berry is more oriented towards application with a lot of general viewing information.

I doubt there is any source for these now, and your likely only going to find them free floating by luck.

I've talked Kinkos into making copies of other pamphlets by matching the paper and double printing on double sized sheets. Then folding the sheets made sort of a duplicate copy. The three items shown are stapled booklets with dates all over them and I doubt they would touch these for duplicating, but they might. It would be an indefinite time frame for me to scan or copy them. I'll likely forget, no time now, I'd have to figure out the scanner thing all over again.

#7 DLuders

DLuders

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3,890
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Spokane, WA

Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:31 AM

Thanks for the pictures and information!  smile.gif    It seems that the pamphlets changed their covers (at least) over time.  Here's a picture of an ~Oct 1977 "The Edmund Wide-Field Telescope" pamphlet:   https://www.cloudyni...any/?p=6139954 

 

 



#8 apfever

apfever

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,112
  • Joined: 13 May 2008
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 28 March 2018 - 11:18 AM

Thanks for the pictures and information!  smile.gif    It seems that the pamphlets changed their covers (at least) over time.  Here's a picture of an ~Oct 1977 "The Edmund Wide-Field Telescope" pamphlet:   https://www.cloudyni...any/?p=6139954 


That string was started by me about 4 years ago. I remember nothing of quite a bit of it. The Astroscan with the tripod bracket and skinny metal tripod, well that whole thing is totally foreign to me now, I can't remember that tripod. I know the pictures of my place, but without recollection it is a strange physiological sensation to see them. No problem, it's a situation I'm somewhat accustomed to now, it's kind of a buzz.

Yep, the covers as well as the contents of the booklets have morphed over time and probably with every revision to some extent. Any revision in any series would suffice for collectability to me. I wouldn't worry about having to have the first version released. I used to take the booklets to Kinkos, make sure they could duplicate it, then I'd carefully remove the staples and have the paper matched for type, then two sided printing on the double sized papers. It was very time consuming and I'm afraid those days of paper work are just going to be behind me now.

#9 DLuders

DLuders

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 3,890
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2017
  • Loc: Spokane, WA

Posted 27 July 2018 - 04:41 AM

Both the color Richard Berry manual and the Astroscan 2001 Edmund manual are entirely different.
The 'Astroscan 2001' has much better technical detail of the scope.
The 'Using Your Astroscan' by Berry is more oriented towards application with a lot of general viewing information.

For those who own the "Using Your Astroscan" booklet shown on the left, can you elaborate on its contents some more?  How many pages does it have, and what does it discuss specifically?   hmm.gif   All I've seen is the single inside view in the bottom image below:

 

Astroscan Books.JPG    Inside.jpg


Edited by DLuders, 27 July 2018 - 04:42 AM.


#10 aoneillrf

aoneillrf

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 31 Jan 2021

Posted 16 February 2021 - 11:31 AM

I have the "Using Your Astroscan" on the left. Mine is First Edition 1979. 24 pages, plus cover(inside star map, and outside Astroscan on rock wall and "Passport To The Stars" package promo on the back.
I came across it in my books today and was curious whether it had been scanned and made available on-line by anyone.



#11 danmdak

danmdak

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 543
  • Joined: 03 Oct 2007
  • Loc: NE Ohio

Posted 05 April 2021 - 08:58 AM

I know this thread is 3 years old but if you look at page 8 of the users manual (the link provided in the first post) you can see they list Berry's Using Your Astroscan book under "additional Reading" and shows it has 26 pages.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: classic, reflector



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics