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Olympus OM-1 a dinosaur?

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#1 DS-16A

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 02:26 PM

does an Olympus OM-1 camera body with AP accessories have any value these days with DSLR so popular now? Getting back into the hobby after many years and I have this camera, but it doesn't look like I will be getting into AP, just viewing. Any suggestions would be appreciated.



#2 DLuders

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 02:50 PM

I used to own an Olympus OM-1 back in 1979 -- I loved it!  You could get some 35mm Kodak Tri-X film gramps.gif    and have it developed/converted into digital images via a service like this:   http://www.digmypics...ASAAEgLSyfD_BwE .

 

You will need a T-adapter to fit the Olympus onto your telescope's focuser


Edited by DLuders, 08 April 2018 - 02:51 PM.


#3 Joe F Gafford

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Posted 08 April 2018 - 03:58 PM

  I still have mine. I also still have my OM-2 with the first CCD that was used in a camera. This CCD did not image, but read the light reflecting off of the film and was the auto exposure for this model. I still use the better OM bayonet lenses with my Olympus E-500 DSLR with an OM to Four-Thirds adapter. That adapter also is used to put my E-500 on my telescopes via a T-adapter. This E-500 camera does the bright items such as eclipses, occultations and bright large clusters. My first OM-1 was a gift when my Yashika was stolen shortly after coming home from the Navy around 1977. My second one was an insurance replacement of the first one that got stolen when I moved into this house in 1983. The OM-1 has a mechanically controlled shutter that the other camera manufacturers went to electronic control. Those cameras' battery died during long exposures as mentioned in various articles in the popular publications back then. I exposed film as long as 90 minutes. 

  Negatives? Keep your negatives! This is your original document! This document is an analog one, not digital! There are 16-bit film and photo scanners out there that will bring out every detail in those! With a scanner you can adjust your parameters for scanning these slides and negatives and then adjust these in Photoshop. Example here

 

Joe


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#4 DS-16A

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Posted 11 April 2018 - 12:06 PM

Thanks for the input. Nice pictures, Joe! I was thinking about selling the set-up, but still sitting on the fence. Not quite sure what to do.



#5 Alen K

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Posted 13 April 2018 - 08:49 AM

You won't get much for an OM-1 nowadays. Or for most 35mm film SLRs, especially the totally manual ones like the OM-1. (Some lesser-known models are rare and might fetch better money from collectors.) If you want to use it (or sell it) check the light seals around the door and in the mirror box. I have three film cameras: an OM-1, a Pentax K1000 and a Nikon FG. The seals are basically mush on all three so I would have to get that fixed if I wanted to use any of them. For daily use I have a Pentax K-3ii but I am keeping the film cameras in case I want to open a camera museum one day. wink.gif


Edited by Alen K, 13 April 2018 - 08:54 AM.

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#6 cloudswimmer

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 02:17 PM

does an Olympus OM-1 camera body with AP accessories have any value these days with DSLR so popular now? Getting back into the hobby after many years and I have this camera, but it doesn't look like I will be getting into AP, just viewing. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

I still have my OM-1 and Lumicon Giant Easy Guider. I used Fuji 400 exclusively throughout the 80/90's, hypered with a Lumicon tank. I have images of for instance M42 that were shot with a single 50min exposure with a Lumicon Deepsky Filter, and there is more detail and outer nebulosity in the image that I was able to bring out scanning the negative into photoshop than 90% of the M42's I've seen on astrobin and flicker shot with aps-c size sensors .. both dslr and CCD. I have the image as well as others of the brighter objects like M8 on one of the hardrives piled up in my closet, I'll see if I can find it and post it on my flickr. The problem now days is hypering kits with forming gas like the ones sold by Lumicon back in the day are no longer available .. and the film really needs to be hypersensitized. Also with 35mm film I was never comfortable printing anything larger than 11x14", and to get those tack sharp prints I really only printed mostly 8x10's. 



#7 johnlind

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Posted 31 May 2019 - 06:23 PM

I still have my OM-1. It performed wonderfully, especially during the time that I got many great shots of Comet Hale-Bopp back in 1997, and Comet Haley in 1986. I have never upgraded to ccd or other. I would like to think that some night I will get back into astrophotography. My health and that of my wife is a contributing factor in my availability to the hobby. But I will always have my memories of those good times both on film and in my head.



#8 jgraham

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Posted 03 June 2019 - 08:35 PM

My OM-1 was my workhorse camera for 15 years. Loved it! I may still have it in storage somewhere. I also have an OM-10 with the little adapter than gave it the same functionality as the OM-2.

 

Fun stuff.



#9 Traveler

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Posted 04 June 2019 - 11:43 AM

I understand why but it don't feel it is "right" that such a camera like the OM-1 is nothing worth anymore economical speaking...It was a milestone back then in te early 70's.



#10 Todd N

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 06:25 AM

I understand why but it don't feel it is "right" that such a camera like the OM-1 is nothing worth anymore economical speaking...It was a milestone back then in te early 70's.

Actually, such old camera gear can fetch some high prices in the used market; See KEH Camera Olympus bodies for sale: https://www.keh.com/...mm-24x36mm.html

 

The high cost is one of the reasons I'm likely to stay away from medium format.

 

Todd



#11 Michal1

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 10:24 AM

The high cost is one of the reasons I'm likely to stay away from medium format.

 

My primary medium is the medium format and I consider exactly the opposite -- downgrading to 35mm. The reason is the availability of suitable films. For now, I still have enough of the MF film in the freezer.


Edited by Michal1, 05 June 2019 - 10:25 AM.


#12 Alen K

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Posted 05 June 2019 - 07:52 PM

Actually, such old camera gear can fetch some high prices in the used market; See KEH Camera Olympus bodies for sale: https://www.keh.com/...mm-24x36mm.html

And we can see right there that the OM-1 is not a camera that has retained its value. There's one there for only $47 and another for $65. I bought mine used back in 2002 from a fellow member of my local astronomy club (he replaced it with a DSLR the following year) so he probably gave me a deal. The camera was like new and he included a Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 lens and a Beattie Intenscreen viewfinder screen, all for $200. The Intenscreen alone (what a Godsend for astrophotography that turned out to be) was worth at least $100 and the lens was probably worth at least $50, so the camera itself likely cost me $50 at most. I could sell mine and at the very least get my money back! smile.gif

But I would never sell it. It would be like giving up an old friend. Not that I have any intention of using it again. I cherish all the astrophotos I took with it but I am so done with film.

#13 Todd N

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Posted 06 June 2019 - 04:39 AM

And we can see right there that the OM-1 is not a camera that has retained its value. There's one there for only $47 and another for $65. I bought mine used back in 2002 from a fellow member of my local astronomy club (he replaced it with a DSLR the following year) so he probably gave me a deal. The camera was like new and he included a Zuiko 50mm f/1.8 lens and a Beattie Intenscreen viewfinder screen, all for $200. The Intenscreen alone (what a Godsend for astrophotography that turned out to be) was worth at least $100 and the lens was probably worth at least $50, so the camera itself likely cost me $50 at most. I could sell mine and at the very least get my money back! smile.gif

But I would never sell it. It would be like giving up an old friend. Not that I have any intention of using it again. I cherish all the astrophotos I took with it but I am so done with film.

 

Used equipment is graded and priced according to function and aesthetics.




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