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Potential Nova Per 2018

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#1 BrooksObs

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 01:11 PM

Announcement appearing only an hour, or so, ago on the AAVSO's Forum:

 

"2018 04 29.4740 UT

 

Yuji Nakamura, Kameyama, Mie, Japan, reports his discovery of this TCP (mag 6.2) in Per on a CCD frame taken on 2018 Apr 29.4740 UT (limiting mag 12.5) using a 135mm f4.0 lens. The object was not shown on a frame taken on 2018 Apr 21.4627 UT (limiting mag 12.5). There is a UG type variable star V392 Per at this position."
http://www.cbat.eps....30 4721280.html

 

Confirmation, spectroscopy, multiband photometry, and precise astrometry are very urgently required.

 

This position of this reported (but as yet unconfirmed) nova also corresponds to the known UG-type dwarf nova V392 Per, usual magnitude range 14.1-16.9 . If indeed a nova and identical with V392 Per, this would probably be an event unique in the annals of variable star astronomy, as I cannot recall its like.

 

BrooksObs


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#2 Astroscrub

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 02:13 PM

That's exciting. Thanks!



#3 Joshiewowa

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 02:36 PM

Magnitude 6.2!  Well within the range of visual, even from some cities.  If you can see the 4 Trapezium stars, you can see this, provided it's confirmed.  I'll have to take a look at this tonight for sure!



#4 Joshiewowa

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 03:01 PM

As I said in the other thread, I plan on going out tonight and seeing if I can get some pictures of this.  Never calibrated any of my data for magnitude though, anyone have any advice on a way to have my data actually be useful?



#5 BrooksObs

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 04:59 PM

As of 15:40UT:

 

Pavol A. Dubovsky (Slovakia) writes in vsnet-outburst 22120: "I can confirm the presence of the bright object at the position of V392 Per.

 

If indeed identical with V392 Per, than the nova has risen about 10 magnitudes from its minimum state and would suggest that it is very near maximum currently.

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 29 April 2018 - 05:02 PM.

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#6 goodricke1

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 08:07 PM

DSLR image from 0102 UT, Apr 30. Mag 5.7 HIP 21823 is labelled, and mag 6.7 HIP 22041, so I would estimate mag 6.3 for the Nova, arrowed -

 

1rjqwB.jpg


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#7 robin_astro

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 09:59 PM

My low resolution (R~500) spectrum taken with the ALPY 600. 

 

v392per_20180429_894_Leadbeater.png

 

A strange looking spectrum to me at least but then again this is a strange object !

 

Robin

 


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#8 Aquarellia

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Posted 29 April 2018 - 11:53 PM

Thank you BrookObs for this kind of post!

 

This is an exiting star!

The weather here is very bad but the forecast gives one hour of cloud free between heavy rain periods, that was enough to open the observatory, point the field made a visual observation based on the 2 stars 6.7 and 5.7, the nova was just between so ok for 6.2 UTC 19:58 20180429.

When I close the observatory roof, the sky was again 100% cover with clouds.

 

Here my observation story and sketch : https://www.cloudyni...tar-in-perseus/

 

Here follows the last information about this "confirmed nova" :

http://www.astronome...org/?read=11588

 

Clear sky to you all

Michel


Edited by Aquarellia, 30 April 2018 - 03:18 AM.

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#9 BrooksObs

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 09:10 AM

As brother Michel experienced last evening, the bulk of Europe was between 80% and 90% overcast over night, limiting the number of sightings of the new nova. Conversely, most of the United States enjoyed very clear weather almost coast-to-coast, However, delay in the word getting out to hobbyists seems to have limited reported sightings here, although it is still early on Monday morning yet and some observers may not fave filed reports yet. I, too, am under a frustrating slowly moving deck of clouds!

 

Whatever the reason, observations remain scarce. The mean of the data reported overnight spans magnitude 6.2-6.8 with a mean of near magnitude 6.5 with no obvious trend apparent in the data. Hydrogen alpha lines appear in the object's spectrum suggesting to me that the nova is currently at maximum light. Those reporting the spectra data report that the nova is exhibiting spectral characteristics of a "classical nova" which is encouraging as most of these tend to remain within a magnitude or so of maximum light for at least several days before a decline sets in. This should give observers ample opportunity to locate, track and record in detail the star's decline and spectral changes. Being tentatively identified with V392 Per, I was concerning the the star might be an example of one of the "fast" recurrent novae, certain of which can decline in brightness at a truly precipitous rank. Detailed monitoring of the nova by every method is, as I expressed in my initial post, extremely important since it may be the first record of a UG-type variable ever going nova (nova have been observed to become UG stars, but never vice-versa.

 

BrooksObs 


Edited by BrooksObs, 30 April 2018 - 09:14 AM.

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#10 Sheliak_sp

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 03:46 PM

I’ve looked at it just now and, although its a bit cloudy, I have stimated a 7 magnitude... is it possible to be dimming yet?

Migue

#11 flt158

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 05:04 PM

I have been checking out my fellow Irishman Goodricke1's DSLR image using the corresponding map on my Guide 9.1 DVD. And I am estimating that our Nova is immediately to the right of the individual star TYC 3347 1038 or SAO 39704. 

That star has a magnitude of 9.3. The Nova is far brighter. To the Nova's right is the double star S 451 which is also in his DSLR image. 

I am just making sure I am correct of the Nova's position. 

It appears that Capella would be a good starting point to star hop to this nice nova. 

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 



#12 goodricke1

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 05:50 PM

That's the one Aubrey. But there has been a noticeable fade tonight, very similar now to HIP 22041 so down to mag 6.7


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#13 robin_astro

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 06:39 PM

Tonight's spectrum compared with last night showing the strengthening of the lines relative to the continuum. Spectra spaced vertically 0.5 for clarity

(ALPY 600 spectrograph. Resolution ~12 Angstrom)

 

Robin

 

v392per_20180429-30.png


Edited by robin_astro, 30 April 2018 - 06:41 PM.

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#14 BrooksObs

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 07:40 PM

Several new items regarding the nova have come to my attention in the past few hours.

 

The excessive degree of cloudiness over much of Europe continues to prevail strongly limiting the number of observers reporting magnitude determinations. By late this afternoon U.S. time the consensus seemed to be that the nova had slowly declined to a magnitude of 7.1 late in their day. However, a final highly perplexing observation has been reported. The nova was reported and confirmed as 7.1 magnitude at 21:45 UT, but only 17 minutes later a final estimation (at 22:07 UT) put it at 8.5 magnitude, a precipitous decline of nearly 1.5 magnitudes in a mere 22 minutes! If indeed true, it may suggest that nova Per/V392 Per is like the recurrent nova U Sco, whose several outburst, unlike classical novae, tend to fully run their course at an outrageously pace. The northeastern U.S. is more-or-less clouded out this evening, so any follow-up observations will have to come from the Southeast, or states west of NY and NJ. Use considerable care identifying the nova if it is indeed fading rapidly. Note that it has a magnitude 9.3 companion relatively nearby to its east.

 

It appears that two past novae have been potentially identified in the literature as being dwarf novae prior to experiencing full nova outbursts: V1213 Cen in 2016 and the recurrent nova(?) V1017 Sgr in 1919. The latter is, however, a most peculiar object to begin with and has been reclassified several times as to its exact nature over the years.

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 30 April 2018 - 07:42 PM.


#15 BrooksObs

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Posted 30 April 2018 - 09:01 PM

Good news. The magnitude 8.5 estimation mentioned in my previous post appears to have been erroneous.

 

Clouds briefly cleared away about half an hour ago here allowing me to see the nova. Using 15x70B the star was obvious in spite of late twilight and the brilliant full moon situated low in the eastern sky. Careful attention in determining the object's magnitude produced a figure of  7.3 for its brightness at May 1.0569 UT. This is confirmed by several slightly earlier sightings reported to the AAVSO over the last hour, or two. Clouds closed back in only minutes after completing my observation.

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 30 April 2018 - 09:05 PM.

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#16 BrooksObs

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Posted 02 May 2018 - 08:41 AM

V392 Per was down to about magnitude 8.0 last evening, according to the AAVSO's data plot as of this morning. This would tentatively classify the object as a "fast nova" with a decline rate from maximum currently amounting to about 1.0 magnitudes per day. 

 

BrooksObs


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#17 BrooksObs

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 02:11 PM

As of last evening (May 4.0 UT) V392 Per had declined to just about magnitude 8.5 and there are signs that its recent rapid rate of decline has begun to slow just a bit, as is common with many fast novae after initially declining the first 2 or 3 magnitudes. Although progressively less well placed for observation low in the northwest as twilight ends, it should still be possible for observers at mid-northern latitudes to follow this object for perhaps another couple of weeks given an unobstructed horizon.

 

BrooksObs


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#18 Aquarellia

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 04:21 PM

I agree with BrooksObs, the decline is now more slow.

Just one hour ago April 5th 19:52 UTC, my estimation was 8.9.

But now this star is too close to a tree, so I think I will cut partially this poor tree tomorrow...

Michel


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#19 flt158

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 06:47 PM

I have another tree, Michel also. 

I thought it was going to prevent my observation of the Nova. 

But I am thrilled to have finally observed V392 Persei after a week of cloud. 

The Nova is a quite a strong orange -similar to a carbon star. 

It is definitely brighter than the star TYC 3347 1038 right next to it. 

I saw the nova at the minimum power of 40X. At this power, I could see the double star S 451 also to the west. 

From 112X the nova's orange colour was very noticeable all the way up to 167X.

So my deepest thanks for all who highlighted this particular Nova Persei. 

It is only my 2nd nova since Nova Delphini about 5 years ago. 

 

May I ask just 3 questions?

What is the distance to V392 Persei?

Why has it orange now?

And finally, normally V392 has a magnitude of 15.0 to 15.5. 

Now that its magnitude is between 8.5 and 9.0, how many times brighter is that?

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 



#20 BrooksObs

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 08:20 AM


May I ask just 3 questions?

What is the distance to V392 Persei?

Why has it orange now?

And finally, normally V392 has a magnitude of 15.0 to 15.5. 

Now that its magnitude is between 8.5 and 9.0, how many times brighter is that?

 

Clear skies from Aubrey. 

 

Well, Aubrey, he's the way I'd respond to your questions re V392 Per:

 

Distance - I see that Bob King, basing his figure on GAIA parallax data, says about 12,700 lys.

 

Color - The reddish hue would be due to intense hydrogen alpha emission lines which are commonly seen in the early post-maximum stage of novae.

 

Brightness Range - If we consider the full range of the current outburst and take magnitude +15.2 as the system's normal brightness at quiescence and +6.2 at the peak of its current flaring, then the range in brightness is a little short of 4,000x.

 

BrooksObs


Edited by BrooksObs, 05 May 2018 - 08:22 AM.

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#21 DHEB

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 03:06 PM

It was only yesterday that I had the opportunity to observe this nova after a week of cloudy skies. I estimated it at 8.8 (2018-05-04 20:47 UT). My observation fell nicely within the (until then) well defined falling pattern. However, several observers have in the last day reported observations that suggest that the star may have stopped dimming or even become slightly brighter. There may be of course a few anomalous observations here, but on the other hand they are already quite a few of them, so it may well be that there is a real abating in the dimming or even brightening. Let's continue to observe this star. This is very exciting!

 

V0392-Per_Screenshot.png


Edited by DHEB, 05 May 2018 - 03:09 PM.

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#22 flt158

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 05:52 PM

Well, Aubrey, he's the way I'd respond to your questions re V392 Per:

 

Distance - I see that Bob King, basing his figure on GAIA parallax data, says about 12,700 lys.

 

Color - The reddish hue would be due to intense hydrogen alpha emission lines which are commonly seen in the early post-maximum stage of novae.

 

Brightness Range - If we consider the full range of the current outburst and take magnitude +15.2 as the system's normal brightness at quiescence and +6.2 at the peak of its current flaring, then the range in brightness is a little short of 4,000x.

 

BrooksObs

I thank you deeply for these excellent replies, BrooksObs. 

I also deeply respect the parallax data from GAIA. 

And I completely agree with all these facts and figures. 

If I may be bold to say that the only other nova that I did observe was from 5 years ago in 2013. 

Nova Delphini had no colour for quite a substantial period after it exploded. It was plain white to me for a couple of weeks as I experienced it. 

Still, I suppose, no 2 novae are the same!

 

Kindest regards from Aubrey.   



#23 saguaro

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 01:42 PM

I observed the nova over the past three nights May 3-5 and I did not detect any change in magnitude.


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#24 ssmith

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 02:58 PM

Like many others I was frustrated by the weather when the nova was at its peak but was able to observe it on the evening of the 4th.  Here is my photo (actually a stack of 8 short exposures due to the twilight).  It does show a bit of a reddish hue.  The magnitude was calculated using Astrometrica.

 

V392 Per Nova 120mm 5-4-18 8fr.jpg

 


Edited by ssmith, 06 May 2018 - 09:51 PM.

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#25 DHEB

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Posted 06 May 2018 - 03:54 PM

I have just observed the nova and estimated it at mag 8.9. Reported observations (including photometry with the V filter) suggest that the star may have experienced a brief and weak re-brightening during 5 May.

 

 

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