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First time Binoview user - impressed with Baader Mark V

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#1 dcornelis

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 05:09 AM

After 40 years of on-off observing last night was the first time I used a binoviewer. I put the baader MarkV with 1.25 relay in the CFF350 f15 classical cassegrain and pointed it to Jupiter. Please note that for 51degrees north the planet is quit low and I have a short timeslot to observe it in between 2 buildings. 

 

I ordered the explore scientific LE 26mm eyepieces since the 15 and 10mm eudisascopic ones that came with the second hand bino are a bit too high magnification for this scope, they will be used in the 130mm f9 ed vixen. with glasses I get 90% of the view easily, without there is no effort to get a full view. 

 

The view was spectacular, it helps having a well cooled down cassegrain that was well collimated a few days before using an asi174 to examine.

 

I have never seen Jupiter like this. 4 moons with some atmospheric diffraction effect over the distict moon disks.

The cloud surface showed bands like I never before saw them. Does binoviewing help combat bad seeing?

 

It took a few minutes to relax my dominant eye and to tell the brain that the telescope view was now with 2 eyes, from that moment on the subtle festoons and 2 white dots on the other side were so evident you did not have to strain. It helps of course to have a purpose built "planetary" cassegrain and catalin and his team have made a superb telescope.

Merging the images was automatic. 

 

In the 80s I used an 8 inch f8.5 (with a self polished mirror) small diagonal newtonian that showed very nice images of the moon mars and jupiter, but with the binoviwer this is another level of easy viewing of details.

 

I bet that at a viewing night with guests and the moon high in the sky I will have to drag people away from the eyepiece to let others view.

 

On the genesis SDF I use the baader glaspathcorrector to get into focus. 

 


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#2 Eddgie

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 06:22 AM

Wonderful report and congratulations on getting the Mark V.  The Mark V is a fantastic binoviewer. I have owned two and both were outstanding performers and no binoviewer made makes changing eyepieces as easy as the Mark V does.

 

As for seeing, maybe 5 or 6 years ago I wrote some thoughts about how I felt that binoviewers might improve the observer's results with respect to seeing..  To save you the trouble of finding the post, I will briefly summarize my theory here but please remember that it is only a theory.  Also, I may be off on some of my numbers but this is what I recall.

 

With no hard target, the eye will relax at what would be a focus point of about 20 feet.

 

When the eye gets a target, it will focus on that target.  It feels instantaneous to us but we know that nothing is really instantaneous.  If you have ever used an autfocus lens, you have probably heard it "Hunt" for best focus, and even though this happens quickly, it is typical for the lens to slightly overfocus and then come back to best focus.

 

Here is the theory..  I seeing is poor, I think the eye might be constantly hunting for a focal postion that will make the target sharper and I think that one eye struggle more with this than two eyes. The brain associates a changing image with movement, and I think that because the planet is wavering and flaring, the eye might simply be constantly testing to see if it is in focus.

 

And I think two eyes are simply better than this than one eye is.

 

(Fighter pilots are taught not to scan the sky in one continuous sweep.  Instead, they are taught to look very breifly at one spot in the sky and pause a second.  This allows their eye to do two things... Let their eyes completely focus, and make it possible to see if a distant bogey is in motion reletive to the background sky.  Do this test.. Let your eye sweep past a light switch 6 or 7 feet away.  You will see the switch panel go buy, but you will be lucky to actually see the switch lever.   If you stop though, not only will your eye focus on the lever, but it will actually let you resolve the slots in the heads of the screws.   Anyway, for what it is worth, this is my theory.) 

 

I too felt like even on nights of less than great seeing, I seemed to be able to process more of the image. Some of this was just due to the greater visual acuity that results from using both eyes, but I think some of it might just be the ability of two eyes working together to see that the target is in best focus, and if a change occurs, to more quickly bracket the focal lenght for best focus.

 

Maybe hogwash.  Maybe we just think that it makes it easier to deal with seeing.  Like you though, I really felt like seeing was not quite as much of a factor when using two eyes as when using one.

 

Congrats on the Mark V.  It is a top quality piece of gear.  Few things in astronomy are made to the standards that the Mark V is. 


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#3 junomike

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 06:23 AM

Most people are blown away the first tie using a generic BV so I can see how a Mark would further impress.

Sounds like you're hooked.


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#4 L. Regira

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 11:25 AM

I think that a binoviewer reduces the bright glare from Jupiter because the image is split to both eyes and the decrease in surface brightness of Jupiter brings out more details that are usually washed away.


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#5 janapier

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 11:37 AM

I think that a binoviewer reduces the bright glare from Jupiter because the image is split to both eyes and the decrease in surface brightness of Jupiter brings out more details that are usually washed away.

 

If this was the only benefit of a bv, a simple ND filter would have the same effect, which it doesn't.


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#6 wcw

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 04:13 PM

I think that a binoviewer reduces the bright glare from Jupiter because the image is split to both eyes and the decrease in surface brightness of Jupiter brings out more details that are usually washed away.

With the binoviewers in place, just close one eye and you will see that it is not the same as having both eyes. But I think it is fair to say that the reduction in brightness in a binviewer does perhaps contribute to the pleasing appearance of Jupiter and other bright objects.


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#7 L. Regira

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 04:19 PM

Yes, I did not mean to imply that it is only the glare reduction (but to me it is a big part) but also the use of two eyes instead of one.



#8 The Ardent

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 04:26 PM

Which binoviewer do you use?

Yes, I did not mean to imply that it is only the glare reduction (but to me it is a big part) but also the use of two eyes instead of one.



#9 L. Regira

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 05:23 PM

I have a Big Easy Denk binoviewer.  I love viewing the moon, planets, and globular clusters with it in my 12.5 inch Cave telescope. It is a pleasure to use.


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#10 The Ardent

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 05:33 PM

Excellent, thanks. 

The mobile version of CN doesn’t show signatures. 

 

I have the Televue. I’m very intrigued with the Baader. 


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#11 Bob4BVM

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:57 PM

Sure enough, you are hooked. Welcome to the binovision club ! :)

Thanks for the good report.

 

My BVers are just old heavy microscope head conversions, but I love em.  There is just no substitute for two eyes on bright objects like moon & planets, but don't be afraid to try it on some DSOs as well, you might be surprised. clusters are good and even the brighter nebulae respond well.

 

On the few clear nights we had here this winter, I spent the majority of my preciously-scarce observing time on M42 , BVing thru the 8"SCT with a pair of Nikon 7-21 zooms.  To call the view stunning would be an understatement.  I found myself just hanging there on this one object for an hour at a time. There was no end to the detail. And on top of that, colors were easy, something I had never seen in the 8".  

 

CS

Bob


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