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Daystar 80mm Dedicated Carbon Fiber Hydrogen Alpha Telescope

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#1 Procyon

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:25 AM

This is a pretty sweet looking scope / setup! 

 

80mm Dedicated Carbon Fiber Hydrogen Alpha Telescope

 

http://www.daystarfi...t/80Scout.shtml



#2 bob71741

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:13 PM

Are you trying to convince yourself to buy one? Consider this-I have not seen anyone on this forum, or on solarchat, or on the solar forum of stargazers lounge that uses this particular telescope. I think you do not have enough feedback to do due diligence.



#3 Procyon

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:14 PM

Are you trying to convince yourself to buy one? Consider this-I have not seen anyone on this forum, or on solarchat, or on the solar forum of stargazers lounge that uses this particular telescope. I think you do not have enough feedback to do due diligence.

Ok. I'll keep that in mind, thanks.



#4 MalVeauX

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 02:11 PM

I wouldn't bother with it. It's twice what it should cost frankly.

 

It's just a Quark. Notice you can take the Quark out of it. So it's not a dedicated solar scope. It's really just a little 80mm achromat with a helical focuser (I would avoid this like the plague for imaging). Also note the focal length, it's using the Quark's 4.2x telecentric to get close to F30. The Quark doesn't need an ERF at this aperture, and just has to have a UV/IR block filter. Nothing else is needed. So this dedicated scope isn't really what you think it is. It's no different than you just getting any other short 80mm achromat and putting a 1.25" or 2" UV/IR block filter in the focuser and putting a Quark into it and you're set.

 

Notice they want over $2500 for this (on sale a year later for $2k). The Quark is only $1k. You can get a really great quality achromatic refractor with a high quality focuser and more aperture, for $400 or less any day. Same HA filter. Better scope. Way cheaper. So that's why this hasn't gotten attention from the main groups of solar heads.

 

Very best,


Edited by MalVeauX, 17 May 2018 - 02:30 PM.

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#5 Procyon

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 03:11 PM

True lol.

#6 MalVeauX

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 04:20 PM

It's actually a terrible scope for the Quark. I'm very surprised that they used that scope combination. It's an 80mm with a 1400mm effective focal length. So the internal 4.2x telecentric is getting it there. That means it's a 334mm focal length. That puts it right at F4.2. That's really bad for the Quark. This is basically an ever shorter 80mm short tube. Far from ideal. Spending this kind of money for a "dedicated" 80mm solar scope is pretty bad.

 

I'd be really wary to call it a dedicated solar scope. Take the Quark out, and suddenly you have focused sunlight coming through with no filter at all. That's dangerous even. I've cooked some plastic and burned up some foam in a case a few feet away doing this with some of my big scopes, hah. I don't recommend it. Dedicated implies it's safe no matter what with a blocking filter and stuff in place.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++

 

They really should have just bundled a really good achromat (or even an inexpensive APO doublet), be it 80mm, 90mm or 102mm or 127mm and up to 152mm, with a Quark, a UV/IR block filter, with good focusers, and sell those as "dedicated" systems.

 

Example:

 

Quark Chromosphere $1195

Celestron Omni XLT 102 (102mm F9.8) Achromatic Refractor $299

2" Baader UV/IR block filter $132 (alternative Optolong UV/IR Cut Filter, $65)

(Note that you can go cheaper if you stay 1.25" on the focuser; Quark's are 1.25" anyways)

 

Other great "Quark" scopes that would be excellent and serve dual-purpose roles for more than just solar while still being better and really affordable:

 

SW Evostar PRO ED 80mm F7.5 APO (2" focuser, dual speed already) $639

AstroTech AT102ED 4" F7 APO $599

Celestron C6-R, 152mm F8 Achromat (cheapest, longest 6 inch!) $599

ExploreScientific 127mm F6.5 Achromat $599

Celestron Omni XLT 120mm F8.3 Achromat $399

Meade Adventure Scope (ST80, or 80mm F5 Short Tube) $89 (upgrade the focuser, mask the aperture down to 60mm and you're set!)

 

I use an ST80 (same scope as the Meade Adventure scope above) with an upgraded 2" focuser (not required, but nicer). Any 400mm scope will let you do full disc field of view with the Quark. So these short tubes are worth getting, and they're dirt cheap! $100 or less gets you one (Meade Adventure Scope, Orion ST80, Meade Infinity 80, Celestron 80 F5, all the same scope). They're not ideal at the 80mm aperture though, so you simply mask it down to 42mm (with the supplied lens cover, it has this already built in to take off the central mask and it stops the scope down to F10 immediately which is perfect for Quarks). Or, you can make a mask for it, and go for 60mm, putting it close to F30, not quite, but close. You then have a great full disc FOV option with appropriate focal-ratio for the Quark. The ST80 is awesome for this because it's so cheap. Makes a great sidekick so that you can do low power low resolution full disc viewing. And then you just move the Quark over to your big 4", 5" or 6" achromat and go high res. And having both with a Quark is still cheaper than any dedicated 80mm HA scope out there.

 

Take any of the above, a Quark, and a UV/IR block filter, and you have a way, way better scope setup with appropriate F30+ ratios for the Quark, better focusers, overall way more resolution options and scope quality for less than $2k with room for modular swapping and versatility.

 

Very best,


Edited by MalVeauX, 17 May 2018 - 04:25 PM.

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