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Quick test of ASI183mm on Jupiter

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#1 Tom Glenn

Tom Glenn

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Posted 06 June 2018 - 02:26 AM

For those of you who have been following my lunar imaging work, you know I have been using the ASI183mm camera in conjunction with my C9.25 Edge scope.  The camera has a 5496 x 3672 pixel sensor, which is great for wide field coverage of the moon.  I have been wanting to test it on planets using small regions of interest, but have been limited by weather and time.  I took this image on June 2 at 06:36 UT using a 610nm long-pass filter at F/10, which is my normal lunar imaging setup.  Seeing was so mediocre that I didn't bother continuing the imaging session, but I'm impressed with how this camera performs.  Despite having an enormous sensor, the small ROI I used had no problem imaging at 200 frames per second.  This image is presented at the scale captured, and is slightly under sampled for my scope, but under these conditions this was as good as it was going to get.  My image of Jupiter and Europa that was taken with the ASI224mc was taken from the next night, and the conditions were better so I didn't test the ASI183mm that night since I wanted color, but it will be interesting to revisit under better conditions.  

 

Jup_233631_TG.jpg


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#2 dirac

dirac

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 10:56 AM

For those of you who have been following my lunar imaging work, you know I have been using the ASI183mm camera in conjunction with my C9.25 Edge scope.  The camera has a 5496 x 3672 pixel sensor, which is great for wide field coverage of the moon.  I have been wanting to test it on planets using small regions of interest, but have been limited by weather and time.  I took this image on June 2 at 06:36 UT using a 610nm long-pass filter at F/10, which is my normal lunar imaging setup.  Seeing was so mediocre that I didn't bother continuing the imaging session, but I'm impressed with how this camera performs.  Despite having an enormous sensor, the small ROI I used had no problem imaging at 200 frames per second.  This image is presented at the scale captured, and is slightly under sampled for my scope, but under these conditions this was as good as it was going to get.  My image of Jupiter and Europa that was taken with the ASI224mc was taken from the next night, and the conditions were better so I didn't test the ASI183mm that night since I wanted color, but it will be interesting to revisit under better conditions.  

 

attachicon.gif Jup_233631_TG.jpg

Hi Tom,

 

Thanks for the post. This is a very good image of Jupiter. I have been thinking of getting the ASI183MM. Have you used it for DSO long exposures using filters? If so, how hard is it? If not, do you plan to?

 

-John (dirac)



#3 Tom Glenn

Tom Glenn

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Posted 13 June 2018 - 02:36 PM

Thanks for the comment, John.  I currently am not set up for DSO imaging, although I think this camera would be good for it.  You would want the cooled version however, as I have the uncooled version because cooling is irrelevant for planetary and lunar imaging.  The pixel size is small, so it would probably best be paired with a short focal length scope, to give optimal sampling for your stars.  Good luck, and I'm sure there is a ton of discussion about this camera with regards to DSO imaging on other sections of the CN forums.  In fact, I think there is a 30+ page discussion about the IMX183 sensor on the beginning and intermediate imaging page.  




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