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Platenary photography without an expansive telescope

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#1 konzy

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 07:03 AM

I stumbled upon this picture of Jupiter today, and was surprised to see it was done with just a small scope:

 

 

This was taken with a Tele Vue-60mm f/6, Powermate 2.5X, ZWO ASI385MC on an iOptron SkyGuider Pro. Seeing was not bad for suburban Washington DC. Autostakkert did all the real work.

 

I'm a total newbie, and of course I'd love to be able to photograph planets, but investing in a more solid setup is not an option right now. I also want to keep my equipment as light as possible, which is not very AP friendly... This picture, however, gives me hope that planetary imaging can be achieved with a relatively basic equipment. If you don't have high expectations about IQ, obviously... But the joy of taking a picture of Jupiter that's not a fuzzy white spot, would be really enough for me now.

 

I have a somewhat comparable setup right now (iOptron SkyGuider Pro, Canon 300mm f/4). If I were to buy a small CCD camera, like a ZWO ASI120 or similar, and put a 2x teleconverter at the end of my Canon lens... Would this setup be good enough  to take modest pictures of Jupiter or Mars, like the one above?

 

Also, I understand that planetary imaging is quite different, and I'm not very comfortable with the theory. Any input on the matter would be great!

 

As usual, thanks for your valuable advice ;)

 

Clear skies

 

K

 

 



#2 Dynan

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 07:25 AM

Fellow CN'er johnsoda gave me this link about the same questions:

 

https://www.youtube....4Bkw3-eibwbLUWh

 

Good help for we wanderers...


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#3 konzy

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 08:21 AM

Thanks Dynan! I have seen some of these videos a while ago, they are indeed helpful. Definitely worth adding to my bookmarks.

 

Konzy



#4 bobzeq25

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 08:30 AM

Sure you can.   But note he used an excellent 385 camera, which counts.  I'd go with the ASI224MC, $249, instead of the very old 120.

 

His frame rate of 27fps is suspiciously low.  Perhaps you can do better.



#5 konzy

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 08:48 AM

Thanks Bob!



#6 WarmWeatherGuy

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 09:43 AM

Check out this topic

Small bore challenge: Jupiter w/ 6" or less

to see what can be done with small lenses. Most are 4 to 6 inches but there are some with smaller lenses.



#7 Dynan

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 10:14 AM

Sure you can.   But note he used an excellent 385 camera, which counts.  I'd go with the ASI224MC, $249, instead of the very old 120.

 

His frame rate of 27fps is suspiciously low.  Perhaps you can do better.

There's Bob! The one who convinced me to buy my ASI224MC. What a great little camera. I haven't captured with it yet, since it's duty so far has bee guiding for my DSLR, but it's getting a promotion next outing since I drafted an original NexImage (a $5 pick-up) to do the tracking.

 

Thanks Bob!



#8 RedLionNJ

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:00 PM

I stumbled upon this picture of Jupiter today, and was surprised to see it was done with just a small scope:

 

 

I'm a total newbie, and of course I'd love to be able to photograph planets, but investing in a more solid setup is not an option right now. I also want to keep my equipment as light as possible, which is not very AP friendly... This picture, however, gives me hope that planetary imaging can be achieved with a relatively basic equipment. If you don't have high expectations about IQ, obviously... But the joy of taking a picture of Jupiter that's not a fuzzy white spot, would be really enough for me now.

 

I have a somewhat comparable setup right now (iOptron SkyGuider Pro, Canon 300mm f/4). If I were to buy a small CCD camera, like a ZWO ASI120 or similar, and put a 2x teleconverter at the end of my Canon lens... Would this setup be good enough  to take modest pictures of Jupiter or Mars, like the one above?

 

Also, I understand that planetary imaging is quite different, and I'm not very comfortable with the theory. Any input on the matter would be great!

 

As usual, thanks for your valuable advice wink.gif

 

Clear skies

 

K

There are a couple significant deviations, here.

 

1. I seriously doubt the optical quality of a typical Canon 300mm lens is going to be comparable with that of a Televue Pronto. But don't let that stop you trying.

2. Even with a 2x teleconverter, you'd only be at f/8. You'd typically want at least twice this in order to eke the most out of your sensor. I would say in the order of f/20 for the ASI120 (3.75u pixels).

 

So bear in mind you'll now also be tethered to a laptop or a PC while shooting. I hope that is of little consequence.

 

Also, bear in mind Mars is *about* half the apparent size of Jupiter, at best.

 

If you are wanting to go down the planetary cam route, I'd be trying to find the smallest pixels you can - maybe 2.4u ?



#9 yock1960

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 12:40 PM

Somewhere in the 6" and under thread, there is probably an image of mine from a Meade ETX80, an 80mm achromatic refractor, that I was quite proud of, but never repeated. Years later I used my 102 mm ED semi-APO and got some similar images. It's been 'Katie bar the door' since then, going through 8" and 9.25" SCT's and now an 11". Once you're hooked...it's hard to stop!

 

You've been warned! grin.gif

 

Steve 


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#10 TareqPhoto

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Posted 14 June 2018 - 05:32 PM

First, what is your maximum budget?

 

We can recommend you another mount, if not then buy 3x or even 4x at least, i think this Canon lens is good enough with many Barlow, Powermate is the best but this is also expensive, but definitely a camera is helpful there, and if your mount can handle more weight then why not a scope? This is my image with ST80 scope which is cheap and TV 3x Barlow with ZWO camera

 

03_27_22_g4_ap1_conv.jpg

 

05_57_47_g4_ap1_conv.jpg


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