Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Close to purchase but stuck between 3 cameras for nightscapes - LOVE Olympus live composition, but 16mp worries me vs 24mp D5300 and Backyard Nikon

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Apposl

Apposl

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2018

Posted 24 June 2018 - 03:48 AM

I know MPs aren't everything. But I had an EOS M (18mp) a couple years ago, and loved doing landscapes and long exposure photos/stars and star trails. I had several people buy prints from me, and so I want to continue the hobby, and get a camera again that's at least as good as my EOS M was.

 

So I like the Olympus OMD EM10 MKII. and the functionality of live composition would be huge for me. I know much of that can be done in post processing, I've done a lot of it...that feature just hooks me hard since it was something I did a lot of and the live aspect is really very neat/useful to me and I can see me using it constantly.

 

But as I said, 16mp worries me when I get can 24mp with the Nikon D5300 or Pentax K-70. Sensor size seems important when astro and night stuff is my primary focus and I had several people surprise me with large canvas prints of photos I'd taken of their houses, actually in their houses. So I want the resolution to stand up when or if it's blown up, too.

 

The Pentax K-70 I adore for the astrotrace function. This is right up there with as useful as live composition for me as I'd really love to do some actual star tracking.

 

And the Nikon 5300 pretty much pops up as recommended everywhere and wins every time I compare these cameras, and I am also totally sold on Backyard Nikon and Astro Tool, especially as I do eventually want to try and either hook the camera to a telescope, or a tele lens and ioptron for star tracking the sky/DSOs as best I can.

 

Olympus and Pentax seem to be lacking that awesome aftermarket astro software and I do think a good tethering program is important so I feel I'm leaning more towards the Nikon at this point.

 

I can get the Nikon for about $450, the Olympus for about the same, and the Pentax for $500ish. I then have $300 to $400 for a lens.The Sony a5100 was a possible too as it can be had for $350 but again with the lack of good software like Backyard Nikon.

 

Any thoughts or suggestions would be really appreciated. I fell out of doing this for a while, but I'm a combat vet with insomnia and I found so much peace doing photography and especially up-all-night landscape stuff that I want to start again now that my daughter is older. I'm trying to make a smart choice, get the most bang for the buck, and also end up in a camera family where the lenses I buy will continue to be useful when I upgrade bodies down the road...and it's a lot of money for me so I just want to make the smartest choice here.

 

Thank you so much!

 


Edited by Apposl, 24 June 2018 - 03:53 AM.


#2 GlenM

GlenM

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2757
  • Joined: 20 May 2007
  • Loc: Lancashire England

Posted 24 June 2018 - 09:23 AM

Welcome to CN,it's a great place to be.

 

I know what you're going through. I also use the Olympus EM10 II, I can't really fault it. I have been looking around for a larger sensor camera, but just can't seem to find all the features that the Olympus uses. Not much help am I?

 

If I were to go Nikon it would be the 5300.

If I were to go Canon it would be the SL2.

 

I do like mirrorless though. I keep looking at Sony,but the star eater algorithm bothers me some.

 

The best of luck with your choice.

 

Glen.


  • SandyHouTex and Apposl like this

#3 Apposl

Apposl

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2018

Posted 24 June 2018 - 02:37 PM

Haha, just glad I'm not alone! It's such a nice camera and I absolutely love the features. I do wish something like BYEOS or APT was available for Olympus cameras, though. Closest I can find is something called Camera Control.

 

The Sony is tempting, but I'm only look at the a5100/maybe a6000. And my head is full of all the various stuff I've read over the last couple weeks, but I feel like a lot of that had been solved or wasn't an issue somehow anymore. I know there was a long exposure noise reduction feature that was a PITA and it is possible to turn it off globally now. https://github.com/m...weak/issues/169

 

But I'm not sure if that was the same as the star eater issue, because as I said, my head is full. ;) My other issue with the Sony is the same as anything that's not a Nikon or Canon - I do really think I want to be using something like BackyardEOS or APT.

 

Thank you so much and best of luck to you as well! (I wish that 20mp Olympus wasn't so out of my $ range!)



#4 jiawen

jiawen

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 93
  • Joined: 30 Nov 2014

Posted 26 June 2018 - 11:56 AM

I have an OM-D M10 Mk II -- it's up on the roof shooting M13 right now, as it happens. Like GlenM, I like the camera, but perhaps not at much. There are some serious UI issues, such as how the camera goes into sleep mode when not shooting anything and when no controls have been pressed for a minute or so. And once it does so, it returns to default settings for the current mode. So after I've carefully set it up to ISO1600, FN+RAW mode, etc., and then go to adjust the telescope, mount and whatnot, I have to continually click something on the camera every few moments to keep it from going into sleep mode. I once pretty much lost a night of imaging because the camera had, at some point, reset itself to JPEG mode, and not noticing, I ended up with a night of not-very-stackable images. There is not, from what I've seen, any way to turn this 'feature' off. And while the Myset functions are very nice, it's hit and miss which settings will actually get saved within a given Myset.

 

My camera certainly has its advantages: it's nice and light, so it strains neither my neck nor my star tracker; the small pixel size effectively means that I'm getting more magnification (not really, but it kind of has that effect); the level of noise is decent, considering the cost; and the price is generally  decent for what it can do. If I could spend all that money again right now, I think I might get a Canon that can use Backyard EOS, because that just seems so useful. And I've seen some really amazing single-frame Milky Way shots done with Canons at ISO6400 or higher that looked amazing; I mostly don't dare to go above ISO3200 for astronomy with my camera. For now, at least until I can afford massive upgrades, I've got a cozy niche with my M4/3 adapters and lenses.

 

As it happens, I've never used the live composite feature. Then, I tend to focus on DSOs rather than star trails. It seems like, astronomy-wise, live composite would only be useful for star trails. If that's the thing you want to focus on, it does seem like a huge advantage.



#5 starlight5

starlight5

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 189
  • Joined: 05 Aug 2015

Posted 26 June 2018 - 03:15 PM

  I'm just starting to get into nightscapes and I'm quickly learning how big the raw files can get.  For me, I'm steering clear of an even bigger mpix count for a future camera.  I'm probably wrong in my perceptions, but I would be just as comfortable with 12mpix and I can't see the need for a larger count of pixels.  Seems to eat up a lot of computer processing time for that extra.

 

  Where is the point of diminishing returns with larger amount of pixels and smaller um size?  There must be a point where the human eye can't really tell the difference in a picture?  Feel free to correct me as a newbie.



#6 SandyHouTex

SandyHouTex

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3542
  • Joined: 02 Jun 2009
  • Loc: Houston, Texas, USA

Posted 29 June 2018 - 10:03 AM

I know MPs aren't everything. But I had an EOS M (18mp) a couple years ago, and loved doing landscapes and long exposure photos/stars and star trails. I had several people buy prints from me, and so I want to continue the hobby, and get a camera again that's at least as good as my EOS M was.

 

So I like the Olympus OMD EM10 MKII. and the functionality of live composition would be huge for me. I know much of that can be done in post processing, I've done a lot of it...that feature just hooks me hard since it was something I did a lot of and the live aspect is really very neat/useful to me and I can see me using it constantly.

 

But as I said, 16mp worries me when I get can 24mp with the Nikon D5300 or Pentax K-70. Sensor size seems important when astro and night stuff is my primary focus and I had several people surprise me with large canvas prints of photos I'd taken of their houses, actually in their houses. So I want the resolution to stand up when or if it's blown up, too.

 

The Pentax K-70 I adore for the astrotrace function. This is right up there with as useful as live composition for me as I'd really love to do some actual star tracking.

 

And the Nikon 5300 pretty much pops up as recommended everywhere and wins every time I compare these cameras, and I am also totally sold on Backyard Nikon and Astro Tool, especially as I do eventually want to try and either hook the camera to a telescope, or a tele lens and ioptron for star tracking the sky/DSOs as best I can.

 

Olympus and Pentax seem to be lacking that awesome aftermarket astro software and I do think a good tethering program is important so I feel I'm leaning more towards the Nikon at this point.

 

I can get the Nikon for about $450, the Olympus for about the same, and the Pentax for $500ish. I then have $300 to $400 for a lens.The Sony a5100 was a possible too as it can be had for $350 but again with the lack of good software like Backyard Nikon.

 

Any thoughts or suggestions would be really appreciated. I fell out of doing this for a while, but I'm a combat vet with insomnia and I found so much peace doing photography and especially up-all-night landscape stuff that I want to start again now that my daughter is older. I'm trying to make a smart choice, get the most bang for the buck, and also end up in a camera family where the lenses I buy will continue to be useful when I upgrade bodies down the road...and it's a lot of money for me so I just want to make the smartest choice here.

 

Thank you so much!

If it was me, given these 3 cameras, I’d probably go with the 5300.  It has the support you want, the megapixels, and the price is excellent.  I would avoid the Sony.  Why they won’t fix the “star-eater” problem is beyond me.


  • Apposl likes this

#7 Apposl

Apposl

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 8
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2018

Posted 30 June 2018 - 03:00 PM

Thank you everyone! I have a D5300 and iOptron since yesterday. It was an agonizing choice but in the end the Nikon just checked so many boxes for me. I'm unfortunately stuck with a AF-S Nikkor 18-105mm f3.5-5.6 for a couple months and am going to do "what I can" with that, just learning all the equipment. But a modestly priced (under $300) tele lens will surely be next. Curious what - if anything - I can accomplish with this 105mm and some practice though.

 

Really want to thank you all for your input. Every camera presented sounded wonderful and if I could I'd have one of each. :)


  • Emanuel and jiawen like this

#8 GlenM

GlenM

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2757
  • Joined: 20 May 2007
  • Loc: Lancashire England

Posted 09 July 2018 - 09:45 AM

That's excellent news. I've been away for a couple of weeks having a 5 graft heart by-pass, so it was nice to catch up today. Please let us know how you go on. A nice Samyang 135mm would be nice for you. I have the 12mm Samyang,a nice lens if you get a good one first time around,I did thankfully.

 

Clear Skies,

Glen.



#9 Jeff Lee

Jeff Lee

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1253
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2006

Posted 12 July 2018 - 09:35 AM

Now that SharpCap has a capture folder, I would suggest that you can use the built in intervalometer and just dump images into that folder and have autostacking. I use Panasonic cameras and something called USBtether - but I do also use the built in intervalometer. 

 

As with live view on the Oly's, I can get an 8 second preview on my screen, get  the settings right and let it go. You of course can also use Astrotoaster and DSS if you have a tethering program.

 

I have 2 Gx8 cameras which are 20 mpx sensors.


Edited by Jeff Lee, 12 July 2018 - 09:35 AM.



CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics