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Svbony sv105

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#1 ChemguyLenny

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 03:44 PM

Wondering if anyone has tried out the sv105 yet?  I want to try some moon and planetary video capture and this might fit the bill without costing me lots to investigate.  Not looking for deep space or 2 hour captures.  Just would like to know if it will give some type of result that would be okay for a beginning ap astronomer.  I have a 6se and an orion 102st eq with ra drive motor.



#2 xvariablestarx

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 04:02 PM

I asked about a Svbony camera recently on here, got one reply, and it was not a positive one.

I am getting a ZWO ASI120MC-S in the mail soon (I hope), and I would recommend that, or the cheaper ASI120MC over that Svbony cam.



#3 Adun

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 11:03 AM

Steve Wainwright has been testing it in his blog:
 
https://x-bit-astro-...105-camera.html

 

He seems to be helping the developer of the AstroDMX linux software to test it with many different cameras, and he grabbed the SV105 for his tests.

 

In some other of his blog's posts he did some lunar shots, a lunar mosaic, Jupiter, and even some android/chromeOS use.

 

Here's his Jupiter image:

 

JupiterSV105.png

 

 

From Steve's lunar and planetary pictures, it seems that (although obvious) the performance of the SV105 is not on par with the real planetary cameras like the IMX224 based ones or even the AR130 based ones. Even the SVBONY T7 W2568A (an ASI120 clone a.k.a. "Datyson T7") provides much, much better images (Steve also tried that one).

 

I'd venture to guess the limiting factor is the fact that the SV105 seems to only output MJPG video (not RAW) which means there's some unavoidable compression happening that may be adding to whatever limitations the OV2710 sensor already has.

 

Still, Steve's lunar and planetary SV105 shots look rather nice for a $42 camera. I've owned an IMX224 camera for a year, which is terrific for planetary, but costs almost 5 times as much as the SV105, and I know some amateur astronomers in my country who would be delighted with the results of that SV105 (as modest as they might be).

 

For planetary imaging on a budget, I'd say the RisingCam RT224 for $165 is the best value. The SVBony T7 W2568A is an interesting alternative for $97 (color), saving a few bucks and gaining better compatibility (linux, RPi, etc).

 

For guiding... that's a different question. I wonder if the SV105 could serve as a cheap $42 guider for Metaguide or PHD2.


Edited by Adun, 19 September 2018 - 11:04 AM.

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#4 khobar

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 09:09 PM

I have the SV105 and my impression is that it does okay (see my Mars shot from the other night: https://www.cloudyni...41-mars-091618/). I'd recommend it for a beginner, especially after I bought and returned an AS120MC a while back.

 

However, it does have limitations, obviously. The one I received did not have a threaded nose. This has since been corrected. It really needs a moon filter of some sort to cut down some light. Another limitation, at least in SharpCap/Windows - it's advertised as supporting up to 200 fps (320x240), but I can only get 30 fps. There is no raw output, as Adun pointed out, so there's already some compression going on. 

 

All that being said, if you're looking for something cheap (I paid $50) it at least works out of the box. Just plug it in and presto, you're ready to go.

 

My 2 cents.


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#5 spudie14

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 10:45 AM

was just wondering if anyone has managed to use this cheap camera as a autoguider camera



#6 Adun

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 11:04 AM

was just wondering if anyone has managed to use this cheap camera as a autoguider camera

 

It will not work.

 

I got one, and briefly tested it on my 50mm guidescope before gifting it to a local fellow who loves the moon & planets.

 

I found that with the exposure limit and the sensitivity of the OV sensor there were not enough stars for guiding (some times there was none).

 

For lunar and planetary it's ok, but for guiding (or platesolving) the SV105 is just not sensitive enough.


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#7 spudie14

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 01:58 PM

Thanks for the reply orderd one from amazon. Have a 70mm guide scope will give it a quick try but doesn't  sound to hopeful 



#8 Adun

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 04:10 PM

Thanks for the reply orderd one from amazon. Have a 70mm guide scope will give it a quick try but doesn't  sound to hopeful 

 

The guy from xbit astro imaging said that (for lunar imaging) "the camera is very light sensitive and requires filtration in order not to saturate the sensor". When I tried the camera at it's minimum supported exposure (I think it was 15ms) it was indeed saturated by a full moon, so it is more sensitive that -say- a webcam, and the pixels are not small (3.0 um I recall).

 

But the maximum exposure is just  500ms, and in my test while that did easily pick up bright stars, there were plenty of areas in the sky (at 190mm FL) where it didn't pick up any star. I guess you can move the guidescope to hunt for a guidestar, but some parts of the sky (Leo, Virgo) might be tough.

 

It's a good beginner/outreach camera for the moon and planets, with superb compatibility (even with tablets and smartphones!), but but I wouldn't recommend it for guiding.


Edited by Adun, 06 January 2019 - 08:50 AM.


#9 spudie14

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 08:05 PM

Thanks for the reply will give it a try. wonder why its limited  to such short exposures



#10 localyokel

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 08:51 PM

I have tried to work the sv 105 with my 5SE. I can't get anything on my laptop but varying shades of gray. I wrote into the company (no one there seems fluent in English). She ultimately concluded I would need a focal reducer. Is this worth trying or should I just return the thing? Just trying to get a little beginenner astrophotography started.



#11 Adun

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Posted 02 February 2019 - 11:27 PM

I have tried to work the sv 105 with my 5SE. I can't get anything on my laptop but varying shades of gray. I wrote into the company (no one there seems fluent in English). She ultimately concluded I would need a focal reducer. Is this worth trying or should I just return the thing? Just trying to get a little beginenner astrophotography started.

 

Hmmm. The one I gifted, I briefly tried it on my C90 and on a guidescope to make sure it worked, and it did fine on both.

 

* What software are you using? Which settings? What exposure and gain are you using?

* How is your light path set up? Are you using a diagonal?



#12 localyokel

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Posted 03 February 2019 - 05:47 PM

Hmmm. The one I gifted, I briefly tried it on my C90 and on a guidescope to make sure it worked, and it did fine on both.

 

* What software are you using? Which settings? What exposure and gain are you using?

* How is your light path set up? Are you using a diagonal?

Using sharpcap 3.1 that came with the camera. I have used varying settings trying to get a better image. I am using a diagonal. I tried using it throughout the lunar eclipse both with and without the lunar filter. I would have thought this an idea time to get some kind of images but just shadowy screen was all I could accomplish. Should I be able to see something terrestrial with this thing?



#13 Adun

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 12:49 PM

Using sharpcap 3.1 that came with the camera. I have used varying settings trying to get a better image. I am using a diagonal. I tried using it throughout the lunar eclipse both with and without the lunar filter. I would have thought this an idea time to get some kind of images but just shadowy screen was all I could accomplish. Should I be able to see something terrestrial with this thing?


Work out terrestrial first. It's much simpler and will enable you to work out many kinks before trying with the moon.

First: with the camera plugged to the computer, but not attached to any telescope, set exposure to ~250ms and aim the bare camera to a bright light source. You should see the sharpcap screen go bright/white, and then if you cover the camera it should go black. This is the basic test that it works.

Then: using it in the telescope, try at daytime with a terrestrial object that is at least a few dozen meters away. When I tried the SV105 with my guidescope I first used my car as a target on daylight to figure out the focusing distance.

Also: Try without the diagonal first. Only if you can't reach focus should you try with the diagonal.

Then: It sharpcap, use exposures that are very short for the daytime test. I think 15ms was the minimum. Something between 15ms and at most 250ms should suffice for the daytime test. Gain/brightness should be maxed. Work the focuser very slowly until an image forms. You should be able to image daytime targets such as trees or license plates. If you can't try adding the diagonal. If you still can't then something is odd

After you get it to work on daytime, aim the telescope at the most distant object you can (a faraway mountain or such), and work the focuser to get a proper image. Once you do, tune your finderscope so that it aims at the same object you see in the computer screen. This is important to help you aim at the moon later.

With the finderscope aimed, leave the setup assembled, without touching the focuser nor finder. It should be ready for "first light" with the moon
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#14 localyokel

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Posted 04 February 2019 - 09:38 PM

Work out terrestrial first. It's much simpler and will enable you to work out many kinks before trying with the moon.

First: with the camera plugged to the computer, but not attached to any telescope, set exposure to ~250ms and aim the bare camera to a bright light source. You should see the sharpcap screen go bright/white, and then if you cover the camera it should go black. This is the basic test that it works.

Then: using it in the telescope, try at daytime with a terrestrial object that is at least a few dozen meters away. When I tried the SV105 with my guidescope I first used my car as a target on daylight to figure out the focusing distance.

Also: Try without the diagonal first. Only if you can't reach focus should you try with the diagonal.

Then: It sharpcap, use exposures that are very short for the daytime test. I think 15ms was the minimum. Something between 15ms and at most 250ms should suffice for the daytime test. Gain/brightness should be maxed. Work the focuser very slowly until an image forms. You should be able to image daytime targets such as trees or license plates. If you can't try adding the diagonal. If you still can't then something is odd

After you get it to work on daytime, aim the telescope at the most distant object you can (a faraway mountain or such), and work the focuser to get a proper image. Once you do, tune your finderscope so that it aims at the same object you see in the computer screen. This is important to help you aim at the moon later.

With the finderscope aimed, leave the setup assembled, without touching the focuser nor finder. It should be ready for "first light" with the moon

Great thanks for the step by step. Very kind of you. This is alot more complicated than I had anticipated. I will give it a go..



#15 Old star gazer

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 10:43 AM

It will not work.

 

I got one, and briefly tested it on my 50mm guidescope before gifting it to a local fellow who loves the moon & planets.

 

I found that with the exposure limit and the sensitivity of the OV sensor there were not enough stars for guiding (some times there was none).

 

For lunar and planetary it's ok, but for guiding (or platesolving) the SV105 is just not sensitive enough.

Seems odd to me. I have one and it is working pretty well with PHD2 although I'm using more than a tiny guidescope



#16 TheLightCollector

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 12:55 PM

I use the sv105 with my 90mm doublet.I can only achieve focus with it in conjunction with a diagonal. That being said ,it is a good little budget cam for planetary imaging. I've gotten some decent results imaging Mars,Jupiter,Sarurn ,and the moon with it.

#17 Adun

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 10:03 PM

I use the sv105 with my 90mm doublet.I can only achieve focus with it in conjunction with a diagonal. That being said ,it is a good little budget cam for planetary imaging. I've gotten some decent results imaging Mars,Jupiter,Sarurn ,and the moon with it.

 

Can you share some pics?



#18 ATM57

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Posted 14 August 2019 - 03:07 PM

Here are some of the results I'm getting with the SV105 using my C14. As a beginner imager (only a couple of months) I have had good results with this camera so far despite what others are saying against it. I bought this camera to learn the ins-and-outs of lunar/planetary imaging. It is excellent for that purpose. I would recommend this camera to anyone wanting to "dip their toe in the water" of lunar/planetary imaging. Low cost and works very well. Currently using Smartcap, Registax 6, and Paint Shop Pro, for my software. Just an "ole' dog" learning new tricks cool.gif lol.gif

 

Seeing conditions were not optimal in any of the images. Still waiting for a good night so I can push the limit of the camera.

 

Notes: The black and white Jupiter shot was my first ever image of Jupiter with this camera. The small color image of Jupiter was captured with the C14 reduced to an unobtructed 117mm (4.625") operating at roughly F/33. Too much color in the image but it was just an experiment to see how well this camera works with smaller apertures.

Attached Thumbnails

  • First Jupiter_1.jpg
  • Saturn 12July19_1.jpg
  • Jupiter 5July2019.jpg
  • 20July19.jpg
  • Archimedes.jpg
  • Triesnecker_Hyginus 9July2019.jpg
  • Ptolemaeus 1.jpg

Edited by ATM57, 14 August 2019 - 03:46 PM.

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#19 ATM57

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 12:05 PM

This old brain forgot to add to the previous post that only 200 frames were needed for each capture. No filters.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Copernicus 1.jpg

Edited by ATM57, 20 August 2019 - 03:08 PM.

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#20 ATM57

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Posted 29 August 2019 - 12:53 AM

The seeing has not been kind in August. Spent more time learning the ins and outs of software. Still have a ways to go. Here is a shot showing my first shadow transit (Io). Single capture. For a 50 dollar camera, I don't think its too bad. undecided.gif  grin.gif flowerred.gif

Attached Thumbnails

  • First Shadow Transit 27 July 19.jpg

Edited by ATM57, 29 August 2019 - 01:02 AM.

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#21 ATM57

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Posted 04 September 2019 - 05:40 PM

Still in imaging school.wink.gif   Not that the learning ever ends... Seeing conditions about 5-6/10. 200 frames. C14 @ F/30. Looks like I captured hints of Encke division/minima. Hope to get a good night soon before Saturn gets too low. Jupiter is just about done for the year. It hides behind a neighbors large tree when the sky is dark frown.gif Dang it!

Attached Thumbnails

  • 3 Sept 2019.jpg

Edited by ATM57, 04 September 2019 - 11:02 PM.

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#22 madsci61

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 09:59 PM

If anyone is interested this picture was taken using the "Snapshot mode" of SharpCap with the SV105 attached to am AWB OneSky 130.

Moon20190713 00003

 

I recently added a Virtuoso mount and I'm attempting to get some better planet pictures (Jupiter and Saturn) but the weather has been terribly friendly of late. (Clear skies and enough wind to shake the OneSky or calm winds and cloudy skies.) 


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#23 Lewis & Clark

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 06:14 PM

 Looking at Jupiter.......... All i get using the svbony sv105 is a white blur, and i cant find a user manual  to figure out what i'm doing wrong          157187186549965938.png



#24 Adun

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 06:53 PM

 Looking at Jupiter.......... All i get using the svbony sv105 is a white blur, and i cant find a user manual  to figure out what i'm doing wrong          attachicon.gif 157187186549965938.png

 

To me it looks blurry.

 

Either it's out of focus (fixed by turning the focuser of your 6SE until the image improves)

 

...or exposure is too high, which needs lowering exposure to the minimum millisecond value, and/or using a filter to dim  the image (a moon, or ND, or variable polarizing filter). If it's exposure, then a barlow could also help (by making the image larger, the barlow spreads the light)


Edited by Adun, 23 October 2019 - 06:54 PM.


#25 Lewis & Clark

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Posted 23 October 2019 - 07:06 PM

Thanks Mate....... i'll try a barlow tonight, if it improves i'll let ya know!..... i just adjusted the expousre time from 63ms to 15ms, i think that was the problem........ Cheers 


Edited by rustycrotch, 23 October 2019 - 07:17 PM.



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