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Mars: Red, ‘White’ and Blue.....

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#1 David Gray

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 10:52 AM

.........Well White (IL light) first-done so as not to unbalance my colour-vision for the non-filter rendering colour impressions.

 

This had been a funny sort of night with N’Sea cloud slowly drifting south about 30 miles off-coast – not my direction; as judged on satellite imagery.  Making it some 50 miles east of me; but at the same time there was spasmodic cloud from the west.

 

With all that I got Saturn uninterrupted but as Mars became available that westerly cloud three times had me ready to pack in for the night. 

 

But it kept clearing each time it was looking hopeless then I got a long enough spell to get the views posted here. Still only 9º-11º high when these were done I did not want to risk holding out for higher with the cloud situation – and the seeing was good enough and holding.

 

The blue (#38A) showed a surprising amount of detail – especially compared to blue-imagery. Syrtis Major bisected by a lighter (cloud?) band that had caught my eye in the IL view.  SM was also showing a thicker/broader profile intriguingly: wider than I’m used to seeing it that is.....     

 

The good weather continues........getting so monotonous.......lol.gif cool.gif

 

Dave.

Mars 2018 Jl 5 Flt IL 29 38A.jpg

 


Edited by David Gray, 06 July 2018 - 04:35 PM.

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#2 stanislas-jean

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 11:56 AM

As usual David a consistent great observation.

Regarding the clear streak you noted over syrtis major coming from the limb, it would be interresting to discriminate the kind of cloud:

- with more investigation using the blue, or the blue-green, or the green filter to see where this is brighter.

Because as the cap is thawing, this could be an ebc borning (Strange to see such as the dust storm is still there, but the vision of SM suggest a dust clearing on that area), the limb of the planet being bright on the blue channel.

Just a suggestion.

Personnally, I will try this night.

Stanislas-Jean



#3 Jeff B1

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 12:20 PM

Great stuff David, just great.



#4 David Gray

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 01:10 PM

Thanks Stan, Jeff....

 

What I noticed was that the apparent EBC was diverging northward/limbward from the equator as my graphic also shows.
In fact I only felt confident that it might not be a ‘continuation’ effect/illusion: i.e. the brighter limb ‘spot’ with the

break in S. Major after seeing it, (and somewhat broader), in the #38A; also with a  check using #58 (not sketched).

 

There is some chance I’ll get Mars tonight and see what shows with various filters; conditions allowing.

 

Dave.

Mars Equ.jpg


Edited by David Gray, 06 July 2018 - 01:18 PM.


#5 niteskystargazer

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 03:13 PM

Dave,

 

Very nice sketches of  Mars: Red, ‘White’ and Blue..... smile.gif .

 

CS,KLU,

 

thanx.gif ,

 

Tom



#6 Susan H

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 04:14 PM

Outstanding, David! Wow. 



#7 David Gray

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 04:40 PM

Thanks Tom, Susan.......

 

Clear.......again........!!!......so far......tongue2.gif.........off out! 

 

Dave.



#8 Jeff B1

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 05:41 PM

Thanks Stan, Jeff....

 

What I noticed was that the apparent EBC was diverging northward/limbward from the equator as my graphic also shows.
In fact I only felt confident that it might not be a ‘continuation’ effect/illusion: i.e. the brighter limb ‘spot’ with the

break in S. Major after seeing it, (and somewhat broader), in the #38A; also with a  check using #58 (not sketched).

 

There is some chance I’ll get Mars tonight and see what shows with various filters; conditions allowing.

 

Dave.

attachicon.gif Mars Equ.jpg

Nice observing techniques and analysis.



#9 astronz59

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 06:41 PM

Great work and sketching Dave! A medium blue 80P works well for me. Managed to spot the extreme southern end of Mare Acidalium peeking through the dust at 1045h UT last night, which would correspond your 'glimpse' also?



#10 Special Ed

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 08:31 PM

Great stuff David, just great.

+1  bow.gif 



#11 tommy10

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 08:37 PM

Great sketches, too bad the dust obstructed your view,thanks for sharing.



#12 Aquarellia

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Posted 06 July 2018 - 11:02 PM

Bravo bravo, wgat nice result and report!

Did you try UHC filter? It looks that this kind of filter works well with the actual storm.

Michel



#13 frank5817

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 01:53 AM

David,

 

Truly impressive sketching here.

What you are seeing with the blue filter is most impressive.

 

Frank :)



#14 stanislas-jean

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 04:07 AM

Hi,

I had a look on Mars last night with the 130mm Cassegrain.

 

Images were average good, not too bad considering the conditions.

Syrtis Major was appearing faint with unequal albedo, cut at around on the equator.

Polar cap was bright, not white, ocre color without filter.

The limb and the Terminator appeared both rather bright with the W56 and RG435 filters with some brightness indentations as shown.

Stunning to see the competition between dust haze/ cloud/ storm with the white haze/ clouds at the same time.

It was difficult to go deeper considering the local conditions and the magnification in use.

If an ebc is there, this should be of delicate contrast, low level.

My modest contribution, David.

Stanislas-Jean

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • resized_mars 06.07.18 23H25UT.jpg

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#15 David Gray

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 05:47 AM

Many Thanks Everyone: for the Comments and Likes........smile.gif

 

My clear sky last night was short-lived sadly......but seeing was poor anyway.  The jetstream is out of the picture but ground turbulence was severe as evidenced by agitated flickering of ½ mile-away street lights.....oh well.......

 

Astronz59: can’t comment on M. Acidalium as it was not onto the disk at the time I reported here.  I did catch it – pale and ghostly – on June 23 and rather more distinct on the 27th.

 

Michel: I do not have a UHC but the #29 (dark red) does a fine job – but first off I use no filter at all just to catch those shades & hues as presented: for the so-called natural/as-is view.  But will certainly consider getting the UHC to become part of my ‘armoury’.

 

As to the current status of the planet: much as I appreciate seeing those albedo features unveiled; this dusty scenario has a fascination with those delicate shades & hues.  Prior to having the ADC what I am now getting is what I was thinking would be virtually denied me with the low altitude.

 

Even so not likely to catch the planet in near perfect seeing conditions, but I rather feel the presented complexity of those delicate tones would be spell-binding.  Maybe I’ll slightly wish for a major storm next apparition to find out..........grin.gif wink.gif

 

Here are some of my best views from the 2009/10 apparition – so having seen it like that a good number of apparitions not too phased with the dust aspect.  After all we are witnessing a dynamic event on another world – scale that up to Earth and we’d be in a lot of trouble I’d guess.

 

Dave.

Mars 2010 Rprt II.jpg


Edited by David Gray, 07 July 2018 - 05:51 AM.

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#16 azure1961p

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 09:00 AM

Dave, honestly, for giggles: post these in the imaging forum ;)

 

I have to say, at least from the armchair as I've not hit mars yet, despite the dust, it's actually proving an interesting apparition.  It's no longer the globe we know as good or better than Earth, but a fractured, even cryptic presentation of parts of features.  An unexpected feature that was all but invisible last time is that polar cap.  Youve got an indentation in it, patches of whiter ice, or more dust free ice.(?)  Dave, is that in fact mars red dust on parts of the ice cap?  I've seen other observer/artist also draw color here.  It is an interesting thing to ponder, frozen CO2 dusted with red dust.   Meanwhile farther away the landers are coveted in the stuff.

 

It's shaping up to be a compelling though not easy apparition.

 

Have you given the 80mm time on this object?

 

The 2010's are remarkable.

 

 

Pete



#17 Uwe Pilz

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 09:12 AM

I sketched the planet last night with my 4 inch refractor at 137x (June 7th, 1h:15 to 2:00 h UT). The most details came out with the Orion filter (b/w sketch), than without filter. I made sketches with #21 orange, 80A blue and #56 green too.

 

The storm is in the southern polar cap now. It look yellowish, not white anymore. With Mars filter I saw some kind or irregularity in it.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1805070130Mars_RApo_137k.jpg
  • 1805070130Mars_RApo_137ck.jpg

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#18 niteskystargazer

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 09:48 AM

Uwe,

 

Nice sketches smile.gif .

 

CS,KLU,

 

thanx.gif ,

 

Tom



#19 David Gray

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Posted 07 July 2018 - 11:35 AM

Thanks All again...............Uwe: that’s a good set and see you too got the SP indentation.......smile.gif

 

Pete: that SP-coloration I can be sure of: as the artist in me wanted more of that delicate bluishness but that pale-russet over most of it would not go away.......Even that pale (EBC??) streak across S. Major did not quite say blueness when applying the impression to the palette for tinting later. 

 

A lot of trouble with that (fighting the inner-artist...); and found best was using the Corel Desaturation Tool on a light setting before it (the ‘EBC’) looked right........Near bluish...but....the Corel sampler says pale grey-pinkish-fawn to near very light olive-yellow-orange (!) at the limb........no blue at all........

 

The “80mm” you did ask me on another thread and I missed it at first.....blush.gif......then later said here:.....  https://www.cloudyni...hues/?p=8664934

 

“Pete mentioned using my 80mm: 3”/76mm/f13.3 actually – the 80 is a SW f/5 refractor. The old (1961) 3” is superior optically to the 80 and co-mounted on the 16.3” D-K and as Mars sinks ever lower will undoubtedly come into use.  The D-K soon to be increasingly partially obstructed by the fence and then the yard wall.  So will go over to the 3” and possibly the 6” off-axis mask on the upper part of the D-K – as conditions dictate.....Also there is the 120mm f/5 SW that I have coaxed some usable performance out of – but the D-K wins unless objects too far west........”

 

They are saying clear again tonight – so hoping it turns out better than last.....

 

Dave.


Edited by David Gray, 07 July 2018 - 12:25 PM.


#20 azure1961p

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 10:16 AM

Dave,

 

Thanks for the replies.

 

I'm not understanding the DK being obstructed by a fence as its rising at this point higher in the sky and earlier as well. Please explain if you could.

 

When I said the 80mm I misspoke as I was referring to the old 1961 refractor you have on your DK.

 

I'm about ready to start making obs on Mars as its up now at a more realistic hour for my schedule. I'll be happy with even some diffuse maria blemishes and a polar cap. Anything but a barren disc with polar cap.

 

Thanks again.

 

Pete



#21 David Gray

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 11:39 AM

Hi Pete......

 

The attached track-plot shows the situation into August through Sept; and that is when it is at culmination/due south:

so even more obstructed either side the meridian.........!! Something like the bottom 2/5+ of the 16.3" aperture blocked

at Mars' lowest declination.

 

I’ve had a look recently with the 3” (80x & 160x) in poor/v. poor seeing –

shows no more or less than the D-K in such circumstances.  Also stopped to 1½“ – same powers.......

 

But of course I can still get an unobstructed 6” off-axis on the upper half of the big scope.

 

As previous apparition will be following the planet at least into Feb. – dust or not/disk-size regardless.....

 

Dave.

Mars Obstrct 2018.jpg


Edited by David Gray, 12 July 2018 - 11:58 AM.


#22 Special Ed

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Posted 12 July 2018 - 05:38 PM

Hi Pete......

 

The attached track-plot shows the situation into August through Sept; and that is when it is at culmination/due south:

so even more obstructed either side the meridian.........!! Something like the bottom 2/5+ of the 16.3" aperture blocked

at Mars' lowest declination.

 

I’ve had a look recently with the 3” (80x & 160x) in poor/v. poor seeing –

shows no more or less than the D-K in such circumstances.  Also stopped to 1½“ – same powers.......

 

But of course I can still get an unobstructed 6” off-axis on the upper half of the big scope.

 

As previous apparition will be following the planet at least into Feb. – dust or not/disk-size regardless.....

 

Dave.

attachicon.gif Mars Obstrct 2018.jpg

"Something there is that doesn't love a wall..."

                                                  ---Robert Frost


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#23 Vedran

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 03:28 AM

Very detailed sketch even with dust storm going on.



#24 David Gray

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 09:10 AM

Thanks Vedran..........and Michael for the Frost line........smile.gif 

 

When I think of it: with careful attention (the right filters etc.) plenty to see on Venus;

and I judge the more prominent Martian features currently are a good deal more

detectable than the normal/general Venusian ones. 

 

Dave



#25 azure1961p

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Posted 13 July 2018 - 09:49 AM

Dave,

 

I've  finally seen  Mars this year,  albeit, with the C90 so far.  I've got to rethink low altitude seeing in summer when we typically have Pickering 8 or better at the zenith.  I was pleasantly surprised to see a doable mars at11:00 PM. The game is on!!!

 

I was duped btw; the prismatic dispersion created a kind of pseudo polar cap (In the wrong hemisphere!) . The bluer end when mixed with the orange tended to appear colorless (that grey that those two colors make when mixed) and that limb happened to be bright too, so yes, I was fooled. I was convinced I saw it! Later on at home, I referenced it, oh well. Now where the REAL polar cap was, nada. Nothing. Not even with the W58 I used for that purpose.  Thats disappointing but given the effrctive Pickering value at tgat low altitude of 5-6, more like 5 ... well itll probably take the eight.

 

I'm amazed you got it with your 3" 1961 refractor.  I cant complain though, focusing was far far sharper than I ever wouldve guessed for such a low object.

 

 

I had to chuckle when I saw the words "Fence Wall" with associated green dashed line. It's among so many other astro names and lines on the map your fence almost looked celestial here ;).  Kidding aside, if there's one thing I wish Sky Safari did it was allow me to fill in the areas obstructed with some kind of graphic tool as you've done here. So much easier to plan. That annoying proximity of the fence though,  I have to believe Dave, you must ve been tempted more than once to trim it down a tad!

 

Thanks for the reply,

 

 

Pete




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