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Meade Polaris "Large Equatorial"(EQ-2) Tune-Up

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#1 Sky Muse

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 08:50 PM

After many, many years, I have an EQ-2 once again...

 

mount-head.jpg

 

I got it within this kit...

 

package3.jpg

 

Upon arrival, however, the axes were not in good order.  I couldn't budge the declination-axis at all.  Here, the indicator for said axis was practically one with the setting-circle; seemingly welded thereto it was...

 

wonky pointer.jpg

 

The RA-axis was a bit too tight as well.

 

As a result of such shoddy assemblages, quite a few beginners, I suspect, who purchase these entry-level kits, at these low price-points, may be oblivious to just how wonderful and versatile these mounts can really be, but only if they worked properly.  Therein lies the problem at hand.    

 

There's also something amiss with this latitude-scale...

 

latitude scale - before.jpg



#2 Sky Muse

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Posted 27 July 2018 - 10:44 PM

I've been using an alt-azimuth mount for quite a long time; too long in fact.  Catching only fleeting glimpses of this object and that has gotten old; old hat.

 

The other night, I sauntered outside, 'neath a nigh-full Moon, and asked fair Luna, "Shall I, or shan't I?  Should I, or shouldn't I?"...

 

072618b.jpg

 

She replied, "Yes, expeditiously, lest you lose sight of my terrible visage yet again...

 

072118 - 6mm2.jpg

 

When the Moon spoke to me, I got scared, ran back into the house, and got to work.

 

First things first: the venerable RA worm; note the three plastic components...

 

RA assembly.jpg

 

The RA-worm meshes with the RA-gear just above it, and drives the gear in its circular motion...

 

RA union.jpg

 

That union is what enables a user to track objects in the sky, and in those objects' circular paths.  When the RA-assembly is motorised, any object can be made to stand perfectly still there in the center of an eyepiece, and for as long as desired.



#3 Sky Muse

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 12:36 AM

To get at the RA-axis' worm assembly in order to service it, the old, legacy motor-drive components should be removed.  These components were used in conjunction with motor-drives that are rarely encountered nowadays.  The manufacturers of these mounts, these modern clones, have left them intact in the cloning, and without updating and eliminating them.  First, remove the toothed-wheel.  The wheel is secured by a single screw, shown here unscrewed out a bit...

 

motor-drive wheel.jpg

 

It is good practice to place these parts upon their removal into, well, plastic sandwich bags, for example.  Have a few or more on hand, but without the sandwiches themselves.  Don't lose the plastic collar(arrowed), although I don't know what it's for exactly; in conjunction with the old, legacy motor-drives I suspect...

 

motor-drive wheel2.jpg

 

The wheel is friction-fit onto the tapered end of the worm's shaft.  I used a miniature hammer to tap it off, from the inner, left side; off the tapered end of the shaft...

 

taper.jpg

 

This is the other legacy component that should removed, again, when servicing.  I call it, the "doohickey"...

 

doohickey.jpg

 

The doohickey, and in all its glory...

 

doohickey2.jpg

 

Now, in removing the doohickey, its post may unscrew off along with it.  Just screw it back onto the mount-head..

 

doohickey post.jpg

 



#4 Sky Muse

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Posted 28 July 2018 - 09:14 PM

Now that the legacy components have been removed, it's time to service the three portions of the mount-head: the RA and declination axes, and the RA worm assembly...

 

mount-head2.jpg

 

...and to correct what the manufacturer(s) failed to do.  If you want something done right, as the old adage goes, you have to...Do It Yourself, aka, DIY.

 

Let's tackle the seemingly less-formidable component first...

 

 

There are two adjustments, servicings, that can be made here.  This is one...

 

worm-gear adj..jpg

 

However, that adjustment may not be necessary, depending upon the accuracy performed at the factory overseas.  If it is necessary, you simply loosen the two bolts slightly, and move the worm towards or away from the gear, just slightly, and until they mesh together to your satisfaction.  You don't want the meshing-together to be too tight, or too loose; just right, rather.  It is also important that they mesh together square, evenly, to one another, and not at an angle.  The bolts themselves will help prevent misalignment; to the greater extent, hopefully.

 

Next up, the worm itself...


Edited by Sky Muse, 28 July 2018 - 09:15 PM.

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#5 Sky Muse

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 12:46 AM

To service the worm, first remove the main worm-bearing's lock-nut.  The nut has four slots.  I used needle-nosed pliers to unscrew it...

 

worm assy.jpg

 

After the lock-nut is removed, you are then confronted with the main worm-bearing itself, which is adjustable... 

 

worm assy2.jpg

 

Screwing it inward, clockwise, will tighten the rotation of the worm and shaft.  Unscrewing it, counter-clockwise, will loosen it.  Again, adjust it to where it's not too tight, nor too loose.  If it's too tight, you will find it hard to turn the worm-shaft with the slow-motion control; or it will damage the plastic-gears inside a motor-drive, the teeth of the gears, and/or damage the motor, if so equipped.  I find that by simply screwing it inward until it's tight, then unscrewing it slightly just until the shaft rotates freely and smoothly, is the sweet-spot.  You can then reinstall the lock-nut, and to lock the rotational-position of the worm-bearing in place.  However, as you screw on the lock-nut, it will try to screw the bearing inward as well.  Therefore, the bearing must be kept from screwing inward with one tool, and whilst tightening the lock-nut with another tool.  You may have to attempt this several times to get it just right; trail-and-error, and as with all of these servicing operations.

 

Now, I removed the worm-shaft completely, and to clean and re-grease the worm, the main bearing and the plastic bearings.  This is optional.  First, the main worm-bearing must be completely unscrewed out and set aside...

 

worm removal.jpg

 

When carefully and gently pulling the worm-shaft out in the direction shown, the RA-gear just above the worm will rotate a little in the same direction until the shaft is freed from its black frame.  Conversely, when reinserting the shaft, the RA-gear will slightly rotate in the opposite direction.

 

The worm-shaft and the rest are now ready for cleaning and re-greasing...

 

worm removal2.jpg

 

Now, you can wait until the RA-axis is disassembled, with the RA-gear backed off out of the way, and before removing the worm-shaft for servicing.

 

Incidentally, this is the only grease I use for reapplications, and throughout all of my astronomical equipment: Super Lube, and to be applied sparingly...

 

Super Lube2.jpg

 

Super Lube is difficult to find locally, depending on where you shop.  I got mine online, from Amazon.  The grease is Teflon-based, which is why I chose it; and somewhat-amazingly, it's food-safe, non-toxic in other words.

 

Next up, the servicing of the RA axis...scared.gif ...


Edited by Sky Muse, 29 July 2018 - 12:49 AM.


#6 Sky Muse

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 04:47 AM

The RA-axis...

 

RA axis.jpg

 

At the back of the RA-axis, we find this pretty little Meade badge...

 

RA lock-nut cover.jpg

 

"Whatever could be behind that?", I wondered...

 

RA lock-nut.jpg

 

Why, it's the RA-axis' lock-nut...scared.gif !  

 

Do I really want to take that off?  Will parts spill everywhere if I do; and if I do get it off, will I be able to put it back on?  Bah!  I'm not scared; not me...

 

RA lock-nut3.jpg

 

Underneath the lock-nut, in that order, are the washers, one of metal, and two of plastic.  Now that it's off, what do I do next...

 

RA spindle.jpg


Edited by Sky Muse, 29 July 2018 - 08:24 AM.

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#7 Sky Muse

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 07:37 AM

I know what to do next.  Let's have a pull-apart, and look inside...

 

RA pull-apart.jpg

 

RA pull-apart2.jpg

 

That's everything inside and that slides onto the RA spindle, including the blue setting-circle.  You want to clean all the parts, rid them all of the factory glue-grease, everywhere you can see and find it.  But also make note of where the glue-grease was applied there at the factory overseas, and so that you can duplicate those areas later with the Super Lube, or whichever grease you choose.  I've found that the best thing for cleaning off the factory glue-grease is charcoal-lighter fluid; the kind used for cooking hamburgers and hot-dogs outdoors.  I get mine from Wal-Mart.  Now, it's a bit evil-smelling, so always use adequate ventilation.  You can use other things, perhaps, but this stuff cuts right through the factory gunk in an instant.

 

This is the empty RA spindle, and as it descends into its black hole...

 

RA spindle3.jpg

 

RA spindle2.jpg

 

You want to clean the spindle and its cavity out thoroughly.  When applying new grease, lube up the spindle completely, but apply grease ONLY at the bottom of the cavity, not on the sides surrounding the spindle.  You want the sides of the cavity to be clean and grease-free, and I will explain why further down.

 

Here are some images that I took of the RA-axis' components, and "fresh" from the factory...

 

RA glue-grease.jpg

 

...glob after glob after glob of glue-grease...

 

RA glue-grease3.jpg

 

...to be continued...


Edited by Sky Muse, 29 July 2018 - 08:26 AM.

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#8 Sky Muse

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 08:23 AM

More glue-grease; will it ever come to an end...

 

RA glue-grease2.jpg

 

Note the area of the RA-gear arrowed.  I took a bit of that thick glob and placed it between my thumb and forefinger.  It behaved like half-set epoxy.  As I spread my thumb and forefinger apart, I could make "spider webs" with it, it was that thick...scared.gif . 

 

It took the most effort in removing that glob.  My personal thanks to the factory.  Bless their hearts.

 

The reason that they used that stuff there in that area was to keep the setting-circle from rattling around loosely.  After cleaning everything, I placed a 1/2"-wide strip of PTFE on the outside of the setting-circle's nose...

 

RA setting-circle.jpg

 

...and a far, far, far better solution for that.  You can also use self-adhesive felt; either one to stiffen the setting-circle.  Now you know why not to grease the sides of the RA-spindle's cavity, as that's where the setting-circle's nose will fit.  You don't want grease on the felt, or whatever else is used, and to get all yucky.  Do not make the strip around the nose wider than 1/2", and do not overlap the material; just one thickness all around.  Now, the thickness of the PTFE that I used is 0.020" or 0.50mm thick; however, felt will compress, so I'm thinking that that can used as well.  If not, try other materials, that are either soft or slick, and like felt or PTFE. grin.gif

 

After everything is cleaned and regreased and fixed, reassemble the RA-axis.  At the last, you will reinstall the RA lock-nut, and neither too loosely, nor too tightly.  Now, when I first removed the lock-nut, I tried using a socket-wrench, but it would not fit into the lock-nut's cavity.  Incidentally, in theory, it would take a 17mm socket.  But since it's a lock-nut, it isn't tightened and torqued down like a standard nut, therefore I was able to use needle-nose pliers to remove, and reinstall it.

 

That concludes the servicing of the RA-axis.  Next up, the declination-axis...


Edited by Sky Muse, 29 July 2018 - 08:29 AM.

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#9 Sky Muse

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 07:37 AM

The DEC, or declination, axis...

 

DEC axis.jpg

 

Servicing the declination-axis is a bit simpler than that of the RA...

 

Loosen the three set-screws of the DEC-axis' lock-nut...

 

DEC lock-nut.jpg

 

The lock-nut is also where the counterweight-bar is attached...

 

DEC lock-nut3.jpg

 

When reinstalling the DEC lock-nut later, remember: not too tight, nor too loose; just right.

 

After the three screws are loosened, unscrew the lock-nut off of the DEC spindle...

 

DEC lock-nut2.jpg

 

Note the order of the two washers; and the shallow well, or depression.  The RA-axis has one, too...

 

RA pull-apart shallow.jpg

 

Could those depressions accommodate thrust-bearings...

 

https://images-na.ss...OcL._SX342_.jpg (Alas, this image may very well end up as a dead-link in future.  lol.gif )

 

I may look into that upgrade in future.  You can, too.

 

Remove the upper section of the DEC-axis up and out of its pipe...

 

DEC spindle.jpg

 

Note the red-fibre washer, there at bottom-right.  The RA-axis utilises a few of those as well.  Those can be replaced with bronze washers, and as an upgrade, but they must be of the same dimensions.  I'll be looking into that as well.  Also note the DEC setting-circle...

 

DEC setting-circle.jpg

 

The circle is fixed, with two flat-top screws.  But they were raised a bit above the surface of the circle, so I ground them down flush to slightly below the surface of the circle, and to prevent interference with the rotations.

 

Be sure to clean and re-grease the DEC assembly throughout, and just as that of the RA-axis previously.

 

This is the DEC adjustment assembly, exploded, there at the top of the axis, along with where you mount a telescope...

 

DEC adj. assy.jpg

 

There's really no need to disassemble and service it, unless there's a problem with it.  I took it apart to understand it better, then cleaned and re-greased it whilst I was at it.

 

That concludes the servicing of the DEC-axis.

 

Hopefully, this tutorial will allow those who acquire these mounts, within the entry-level kits that they purchase, to enjoy them, as they should be enjoyed, and in working-order.


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#10 Sky Muse

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Posted 30 July 2018 - 07:44 AM

Oh, I almost forgot: the latitude-scale...

 

latitude scale - after.jpg

 

I ripped it off, then re-glued it, with epoxy.  It's now squared.



#11 PrairieGuy

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Posted 31 July 2018 - 10:46 PM

Great stuff.

 

I acquired one of these mounts last year. It came with a 3" widefield scope. Got it real cheap.

 

Found out that there is no way to balance such a short scope along the dec axis. Too back end heavy and counterweights are needed at the front end of the tube.

 

Besides this, it came with a weird clamshell attachment set-up, and there is no way to attach a dovetail to it. Maybe tube rings alone... but haven't checked it out because, instead, I'm trying to sell it cheap without the scope. The strange clamshell arrangement seems to deter buyers, though.

 

This post has made think about taking it apart and cleaning it. Other than the epoxy glue lubricant, it works perfectly... but with a longer scope, which I don't have.

 

... anyway... thanks for the instructions. Looks like fun... laugh.gif


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#12 Sky Muse

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 03:31 AM

Great stuff.

 

I acquired one of these mounts last year. It came with a 3" widefield scope. Got it real cheap.

 

Found out that there is no way to balance such a short scope along the dec axis. Too back end heavy and counterweights are needed at the front end of the tube.

 

Besides this, it came with a weird clamshell attachment set-up, and there is no way to attach a dovetail to it. Maybe tube rings alone... but haven't checked it out because, instead, I'm trying to sell it cheap without the scope. The strange clamshell arrangement seems to deter buyers, though.

 

This post has made think about taking it apart and cleaning it. Other than the epoxy glue lubricant, it works perfectly... but with a longer scope, which I don't have.

 

... anyway... thanks for the instructions. Looks like fun... laugh.gif

It saddens me that you're wanting to sell it. bawling.gif   The EQ-2 is the ideal among the EQ-x series for grab-and-go.  Rather, effect its versatility with this, and in mounting a wide range of smaller telescopes...

 

https://agenaastro.c...vetail-bar.html

 

Now, ScopeStuff sells this for the older EQ-3 mounts, although it will also integrate with the EQ-2...

 

http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_eq3d.htm

 

...but that's almost twice as much in cost.  With a bit of DIY, you can get just the clamp.



#13 Sky Muse

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 03:52 AM

I had gone out yesterday to my local hardware, and for better washers and bearings for this mount.  So far, for the RA-axis, I've replaced the two black-plastic washers for the lock-nut, and with those of sintered-bronze...

 

RA bronze bearings.jpg

 

There's seemingly no major improvement in the rotations now, but there is a slight one, and therefore worth the effort.  I had to enlarge the inner diameters of both, but only slightly, and with a diamond-bit.  It was very easy with this type of bronze, as it took only a minute or less with each. 

 

Sintered-bronze versus solid-bronze can be compared to solid-oak versus oak-plywood, or even particle-board(?).

 

I have some 0.008"-thick phosphor-bronze sheet, and I'm thinking about replacing the thin, clear plastic washers with that.

 

Stay tuned for even further enhancements... 


Edited by Sky Muse, 02 August 2018 - 03:53 AM.


#14 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 11:18 PM

Unlike many folks, I actually *like* that thick, glue-like lube the Chinese use. It has very high viscosity and tends to 'stick' around (pun partly intended.) I've seen the tragedies that can arise when people clean this stuff out and replace it with a far less viscous lube; metal parts can get into too-intimate contact and wear awfully.



#15 Sky Muse

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 04:48 AM

Unlike many folks, I actually *like* that thick, glue-like lube the Chinese use. It has very high viscosity and tends to 'stick' around (pun partly intended.) I've seen the tragedies that can arise when people clean this stuff out and replace it with a far less viscous lube; metal parts can get into too-intimate contact and wear awfully.

Did these "tragedies" arise with EQ-x mounts in general, and up to the EQ-8, or with the EQ-2 only and specifically.

 

The only glue-like grease that I encountered within was applied in an attempt to stabilise the RA-axis' setting circle...

 

RA glue-grease2a.jpg

 

...and for which I described and illustrated a dry-fix.  The grease used for the rest of the components at various areas is not glue-like, and is yellowish(oily) in colour...

 

RA oil-grease.jpg

 

...but not quite up to snuff when compared to the PTFE-based grease, I feel.  How would that oily-grease fare during cold-weather conditions?  Would it thicken up, and much to your delight, stiffening the mount up a bit, and placing undue stress on a motor-drive if so equipped.  

 

The PTFE-based grease is rated down to a rather bone-chilling -45°F(-43°C).  It also "Teflonises" the surfaces to which it comes into contact.  What could be better than that?

 

Incidentally, the mount-head is, after all, provided with red-fibre and plastic washers throughout, which would prevent said "tragedies" in the first place...even if mere soap was used as the lubrication.

 

You've raised an interesting point nonetheless, and in prompting me to explain further for those who do not wish to take the mount-head apart.  Fortunately, as it comes, the mount is usable, but only by checking, and effecting if necessary, three adjustments, which do not require major disassemblies.  All three checks involve ensuring that the components turn freely, without binding, especially in the case of the RA-axis, and particularly when a motor-drive is utilised...

 

The RA-worm's adjustable bearing...

 

worm bearing2a.jpg

 

The RA-axis' lock-nut...

 

RA lock-nut2.jpg

 

The DEC-axis' lock-nut...

 

DEC lock-nut.jpg

 

Those three points are elementary, and to get the mount going... https://www.youtube....h?v=D6pLp4tlIw0

 

Also, I do realise that the younger generation is not as mechanically-inclined, and all that that entails.  If I'm not mistaken, shop-classes are no longer offered within the public school-systems; here in the U.S. anyway.

 

In the end, these imported astronomical items, along with many other unrelated products in general, are simply not as "polished" to the level that they were decades before.


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#16 Sky Muse

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 05:49 AM

This began the "hyper-tuning" of the mount... https://www.cloudyni...e-up/?p=8742825

 

To continue with the next level, and perhaps "Andromedan" in scope; surely not, as it's all so very simple really...

 

I have two very special parts coming for the mount.  I'm so excited. evillaugh.gif

 

But I'm not going to spoil the surprise.  There was one other part I was needing, aside from what I have here at home and from the local hardware, and to replace this derelict red-fibre washer for the DEC-axis' lock-nut...

 

DEC lock-nut2a.jpg

 

As you can see, they couldn't even wait until the black paint dried before installing it.  Gotta get this stuff out as fast as possible, you know.

 

I was browsing online for a replacement, in bronze.  Bronze is known to outlast the equipment itself into which it's integrated.  Earlier that day, I had gotten a few bronze washers, of two different sizes, and per the measurements I had taken from the mount.  As I was still online, I suddenly jumped up out of my seat and fetched the bag of washers...and lo and behold...

 

bronze washers.jpg

 

bronze washers3.jpg  

 

bronze washers2.jpg

 

This type of bronze grinds easily, and so I ground the inner diameter of the smaller washer out to match that of the red-fibre...

 

bronze washers4.jpg

 

bronze washers5.jpg

 

...close enough anyway.

 

bronze washers7.jpg

 

 


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#17 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 12:10 AM

Alan,

The worst 'tragedy' I found after a lube swap from the viscous stuff to a low-temp, low-viscosity type done by some well-intentioned but naive sort occurred in a Vixen Great Polaris. The brass sleeves comprising the RA bearing/worm wheel assembly were horribly scoured where the gravitational load imparted a now too-intimate contact between the similar metals. The thing was wrecked.

 

Granted, the viscous stuff at cold Canadian winter temperatures stiffens mightily. ;)



#18 Sky Muse

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 07:49 AM

The Vixen GPD or DX is similar to an EQ5-class mount, as I had one myself, once.  So much for the Vixen.



#19 dmcnally

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 07:55 AM

Nice job refurbishing the mount!

 

This type of bronze grinds easily, and so I ground the inner diameter of the smaller washer out to match that of the red-fibre...

I bought some oil-embedded thrust bearings (Oilite®) from McMaster-Carr for my lathe.  They'd probably work pretty well for some of the things you do.

 

Clear Skies,

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#20 Sky Muse

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 05:20 AM

I don't know what's up with these manufacturers, and in thinking that painted bearing surfaces are...all the rage, the cat's meow, et al...

 

painted bearings.jpg

 

hyper-tuning2.jpg

 

All surfaces were eventually polished with #0000 steel-wool and oil, including those of the bronze washer I cobbled together.

 

These arrived yesterday, instead of Monday as scheduled...the surprise...

 

needle-thrust bearings.jpg

 

hyper-tuning3.jpg

 

Now those are the basic materials.  Other parts, and made of phosphor-bronze, or other, will be integrated therewith.  I don't want the needle-thrust bearings slopping around, so something or other will be utilised to fill in the gap between the bearings and the spindles; a ring of metal rod or other, and that would snap into place.  Spindle-slop, at present...

 

spindle slop.jpg

 

Oh no! scared.gif   The thrust-bearing will fall into this hole of the RA-axis' worm-gear...

 

RA gear well.jpg

 

I'm thinking of a thick nylon bushing to fill that space.  It wouldn't have to fit tightly, only enough to support a thin bronze washer, across that yaw, and for the thrust-bearing to solidly roll against.  

 

I'm just getting ideas in my head at this point. idea.gif

 

Alas, I would've preferred bearings that spanned completely across the floor of those wells.  29mm or 30mm might've been the ideal, but I could only find the 28mm. bawling.gif


Edited by Sky Muse, 05 August 2018 - 05:24 AM.

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#21 Sky Muse

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Posted 05 August 2018 - 03:39 PM

I'll have to wait until tomorrow to sort out the solution for the RA-axis' worm-gear.  Today, I've been working on the DEC-axis...

 

I had gotten two of these large bronze washers, and both for the DEC-axis...

 

bronze washers.jpg

 

One you have already seen, and with one of the smaller washers compressed into its center opening.  The other, I had to wallow it out...

 

DEC bearing2.jpg

 

...and for the upper portion of the axis...

 

DEC bearing.jpg

 

It's that movable portion of the DEC-axis' adjustment, at upper-left, that will bear down on it, the bottom of it, seen there facing upward and surrounding the spindle.  Paint will be removed from those thin-walled surfaces, both sides, and a thin bronze washer made for the other side, next to where it contacts the slow-motion assembly and mounting-interface.

 

I really do like, the charm if you will, the simple pipe-mount appearance of the EQ-2. 

 

Why am I going to all of this trouble?  Of the EQ-x series, from the EQ-1 to the EQ-8, the EQ-2 is quite simply the quintessential grab-and-go equatorial, and regardless of debate.


Edited by Sky Muse, 05 August 2018 - 03:40 PM.

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#22 Sky Muse

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Posted 06 August 2018 - 10:59 PM

Yet another trip to the local hardware proved fruitful.  I had taken the RA-gear with me...

 

RA gear well2.jpg

 

At first, I decided upon a nylon insert, but then I found one of steel, and got that instead...

 

RA gear well3.jpg

 

...not quite to the top, yet thankfully the hole is slightly larger than the spindle-shaft; given that I'm integrating standard-sized parts instead of those metric.  If I want to remove the slop as a result, I can shim the inner diameter with a wee piece of bronze sheet.

 

I then chose two more bronze washers, somewhat smaller in diameter, both, yet twice as thick(1/8") as the previous ones for the DEC axis(1/16").  As soon as I got them home, into the vise they went and compressed together into one.  But whilst I was still at the store, I took the smaller washer and rested it on top of the insert within the well and moved it to the side to see just how far it jutted up above the gear's face; only about the thickness of the plastic washer that was there before, I happily found.

 

However, unlike the other altered washers, this washer will need to be sized, the inner and outer diameters, to as close to an ISO9001 standard as I can muster...

 

RA gear well4.jpg

 

Both surfaces of the washer, especially the side that will contact the thrust-bearing, will be polished out smooth.


Edited by Sky Muse, 06 August 2018 - 11:26 PM.


#23 Sky Muse

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 06:15 PM

I had an unexpected detour, and a fortunate one, and an issue that had escaped my attention, until now...

 

The spindle-shaft for the RA-axis...

 

RA spindle3.jpg

 

No, it's not square to the body, look at that, but I only noticed it when test-fitting the new parts.  The shaft has a set-screw, so I was able to remove the shaft completely.  There at the bottom surface of the shaft's cavity, there where the shaft screws and tightens against its bed, there were a few little bits of hardened glue or other.  I remove those with the tip of a diamond file, then sanded the bed smooth.  When I reinstalled the shaft, I temporarily placed a washer and nut on the other end and tightened down the shaft, rather well I might add, and with a socket-wrench.  I then tightened the set-screw to where its socket stripped; and all permanently.  To keep the shaft from unscrewing along with the nut to be removed, I clamped the shaft, then took the nut off.  It is now square and true.  I then wallowed out a small bronze washer for the bearing surface at the bottom...

 

RA spindle fix.jpg

 

Incidentally, during the test-fittings of these parts, I've been rotating each axis, spinning them around even.  I'm happy to report that... meditation.gif.   


Edited by Sky Muse, 07 August 2018 - 08:21 PM.


#24 Sky Muse

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Posted 07 August 2018 - 07:40 PM

I had already ground and shaped this, but I just now took a picture of it to show...

 

RA gear well5.jpg

 

The RA thrust-bearing now has a solid surface for support, but the bronze washer is a wee bit too thick.  It needs to be about 1/32" thinner.  I can raise the bed for the worm-shaft with a thin layer of metal, and to center the gear's teeth precisely over the worm.  As it is now, I don't think that there would be a problem with the gear being slightly off in relation to the worm, but I would like it centered nonetheless.  I'll have to mull this one over...

 

RA gear-worm alignment.jpg

 

Here, a shim has been simulated, and to precisely center the worm under the gear...

 

RA gear-worm alignment2.jpg

 

Leaving it like it is would ensure no problems with installing a motor-drive, but I'm too "OC" to leave it like 'tis.  But I don't think that by raising the worm-shaft up that little bit would interfere with that.

 

The alternative would be to sand down the thickness of the bronze washer, but sanding bronze isn't as easy as grinding.  I do know that that would be best to do.


Edited by Sky Muse, 07 August 2018 - 07:47 PM.

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#25 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 08 August 2018 - 11:53 AM

I really like what you're doing here. It inspires me to see if we have such a discarded mount buried in the bowels of the shop awaiting similar treatment... ;)


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