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IR Pass filters - not sure which one to get

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#1 The_8_Bit_Zombie

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Posted 31 July 2018 - 06:08 PM

I have an 8" SCT and an ASI224MC. The objects I'd image with the filter are the Moon, Venus, the ISS, and Mars. (With a little bit of Jupiter and Uranus.) I've been looking at the different filters, and I'm not sure which wavelength to go for. Most of my targets are bright, so I feel like a 610nm or a 742nm might work well, but I'm really not sure. What do you all think?

 

Thanks!



#2 kbev

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Posted 31 July 2018 - 09:45 PM

If you want to go for Uranus with the 224MC I believe the 610nm filter is giving the best results for most folks, the 742nm filter would need much longer exposures on such a dim target but it would do good on the other planets you mention.

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#3 CPellier

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 04:10 AM

If you only choose one, buy the Baader IR685. This is the widest IR pass filter available. While excellent on some planets, the RG610 passes the whole visible R band and so is not a pure IR-pass filter. BTW you can buy both, the 610 is cheap and works wonderfully on Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.


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#4 RedLionNJ

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 02:59 PM

+1 on Monsieur Pellier's recommendation.  If just one, a quality IR685.  The IR610 is relatively inexpensive as a 2nd IR filter. Then I'd jump to the IR742 or IR807 as a third, then to CH4.......  there - money all spent! :)


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#5 The_8_Bit_Zombie

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 03:58 PM

Thank you for the replies everyone! Looks like the 685nm is the way to go. Is the 685nm good for Lunar and Venus imaging as well? (Those two targets will be my main focus.)



#6 CPellier

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Posted 02 August 2018 - 04:16 AM

Yes for Lunar, but you will lose resolution under good seeing (resolution is lower in IR than visible light - same story for planets of course). Venus however requires a longer IR filter to show its deeper clouds. The Astronomik now are better for that.


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#7 The_8_Bit_Zombie

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 02:40 PM

Yes for Lunar, but you will lose resolution under good seeing (resolution is lower in IR than visible light - same story for planets of course). Venus however requires a longer IR filter to show its deeper clouds. The Astronomik now are better for that.

Alright thanks for the info. I didn't know you lost resolution in IR, that's interesting. I generally have pretty good seeing, so do you think it'd be better to get a 610nm for the Moon so I lose less resolution?



#8 TareqPhoto

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 03:30 PM

I asked about filters t be used in solar system imaging, and i am using a color camera and now i have also a mono camera, and i couldn't get a better answers, all what i get is to have few filters and not one, and i will shoot almost everything i can get, planets and the moon.

 

In addition, when i decide on which filter above then it comes which size, should i get 1.25" so i can use it either individually with a camera or with a filter wheel, or buy it at 2" if i will use only one filter and nothing else, but i know with a mono i will definitely use LRGB so a filter wheel, but the color will be without LRGB so that i feel i won't use many filters with it anyway, i put myself in very difficult situations for decisions when i buy more different items to do one goal or same job.



#9 PiotrM

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 05:56 PM

In addition, when i decide on which filter above then it comes which size, should i get 1.25" so i can use it either individually with a camera or with a filter wheel, or buy it at 2" if i will use only one filter and nothing else, but i know with a mono i will definitely use LRGB so a filter wheel, but the color will be without LRGB so that i feel i won't use many filters with it anyway, i put myself in very difficult situations for decisions when i buy more different items to do one goal or same job.


If you intend to use a big DS camera then you can benefit from 2" filter set. If not then there is no reason to buy 2" and 2" filter wheel. If you want to do full set of planetary imaging then you need RGB filters, L with ADC, some IR-longpass filters (I use yellow, orange, red visual filters for Mars/Saturn/Jupiter/Moon/Uranus and ProPlanet on Venus) for clear luminance-alike image, UV bandpass for Venus +/- Jupiter, CH4 filter for Jupiter, also the red visual longpass filter or slightly "darker" is GoTo choice for Uranus cloud details. After that there can be a 1000nm longpass or 1010nm bandpass filter for Venus night side imaging. If you would want to go really deep into planetary imaging then lunar petrographic filters to show age and composition or sodium/sulfur bandpass filters to show sodium clouds ejected from Io.

You won't be using all those filters at once and not every of those filters is used to get "pretty" pictures. You can even use a flip mirror or a turret and use color and mono camera in the same setup if the backfocus and focuser allows it.

#10 TareqPhoto

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 10:11 PM

If you intend to use a big DS camera then you can benefit from 2" filter set. If not then there is no reason to buy 2" and 2" filter wheel. If you want to do full set of planetary imaging then you need RGB filters, L with ADC, some IR-longpass filters (I use yellow, orange, red visual filters for Mars/Saturn/Jupiter/Moon/Uranus and ProPlanet on Venus) for clear luminance-alike image, UV bandpass for Venus +/- Jupiter, CH4 filter for Jupiter, also the red visual longpass filter or slightly "darker" is GoTo choice for Uranus cloud details. After that there can be a 1000nm longpass or 1010nm bandpass filter for Venus night side imaging. If you would want to go really deep into planetary imaging then lunar petrographic filters to show age and composition or sodium/sulfur bandpass filters to show sodium clouds ejected from Io.

You won't be using all those filters at once and not every of those filters is used to get "pretty" pictures. You can even use a flip mirror or a turret and use color and mono camera in the same setup if the backfocus and focuser allows it.

Too many filters to think about even if won't use them all at once, i will keep looking at results to see which filters are suitable, because only i judge by images regardless the conditions of them, LRGB is done automatically anyway as long i have mono cameras, then it will be mix of other filters for solar system or planetary, and the moon too, definitely it is not one or 2 filters after LRGB, so i have to make sure how to get them one by one according to what i really need to do.

 

I also think no need for larger size filters, 1.25" will be sufficient, i just asked because with a color camera most likely i may not use so many filters as i will with a mono, so that i was thinking maybe 1 or 2 filters at the size 2" to put it on those 2" adapters connected to the camera or even the Powermate one, but i think those cameras are small enough that 1.25" can cover it enough, and the targets are already in center and no need for edges, right?

 

I think my best plan now after i got the mono is first to get LRGB filters, then another scope, then maybe IR pass kind of or IR-cut, those filters from ZWO or Baader are cheap anyway at 1.25", so i think i won't have a problem to have 3-4 filters of them, the results of members here can show the real benefit anyway.



#11 PiotrM

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 04:29 AM

then maybe IR pass kind of or IR-cut,


Ir-pass is the opposite of IR-cut. And if you have a L then you have IR-cut filter as that what filter is. With a color camera you don't use filters aside of IR-cut (and that is often built in into the camera these days).

If you have a mono camera IR-pass filter is the first thing you want to use it with for Moon and some planetary imaging. I use a 7 position filter wheel and for Moon I usually use only one (IR-pass) while for planets 4-5 of them for the main imaging and rest for very specific if needed (RGB + 1-2 IR-pass type filters +/- L filter in good conditions and good ADC correction).

And if you are deciding between filters/filter wheel and a bigger telescope - pick the telescope. Playing with filters won't have as such impact as doing RGB with a mono camera. Plus soon only Moon and Uranus will be available only - and that likes big aperture and simple one IR-pass filter only.

#12 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 06:12 AM

Ir-pass is the opposite of IR-cut. And if you have a L then you have IR-cut filter as that what filter is. With a color camera you don't use filters aside of IR-cut (and that is often built in into the camera these days).

If you have a mono camera IR-pass filter is the first thing you want to use it with for Moon and some planetary imaging. I use a 7 position filter wheel and for Moon I usually use only one (IR-pass) while for planets 4-5 of them for the main imaging and rest for very specific if needed (RGB + 1-2 IR-pass type filters +/- L filter in good conditions and good ADC correction).

And if you are deciding between filters/filter wheel and a bigger telescope - pick the telescope. Playing with filters won't have as such impact as doing RGB with a mono camera. Plus soon only Moon and Uranus will be available only - and that likes big aperture and simple one IR-pass filter only.

This is my first plan actually, i did use LRGB filters with my mono camera, the one which i use for DSO, i really didn't see a big improvements, in fact there is no improvements at all compared using my Mak without any filters, sure i used that mono with filters using my ST80, i think i used that once with the Ma but didn't process the data yet, but somehow i feel i didn't see the difference anyway, but i will see the difference with another scope for sure, from small full frame disk of the moon with ST80 to close up nice frames with a Mak, then for planetary i have to use "Aperture", i am really not worry about camera and filters at all, but i need a larger scope not a Mak and see what i can do, i looked through C9.25 twice or 3 times and also through Meade 10" SCT, the view of planets are really nicer than what i see from my Mak, i feel it gives some kind of brighter view, but sure my Mak put details as well, but you know me, i saw amazing mind blowing pictures from larger scopes and not Mak, so filters will be better used on those than a Mak that can't resolve or go beyond more.

 

So, let's say until i buy LRGB filters and filter wheel, and i keep using my color camera which i really will use even having mono + filters, which filter i should get to use with a color camera? IR-pass there are different bandwidth anyway, i see mostly using 6xxnm up to 7xxnm, not much of 8xxnm, i feel 610nm or 68xnm is more recommended for that with color, or you think this is wrong to go with a color camera? OP asked because he has a color camera and mine too, they are very similar or alike, mine just a bit newer or higher resolution but same pixel size of 224 anyway, so the filter suggested will help us both if we know exactly, and to make it easier for you, the main targets i care more about are the moon, Jupiter and Saturn, anything else such as Mars, Venus or even Uranus are bonus.

 

Moon and Uranus will be available later this year, but i care about next years coming, so i need to be ready from now and start strong and serious next year, so that i won't buy a filter wheel now because ZWO will have discounts by the end of year, i bought the camera last month with a discount, so will do the same for the filter wheel, while the filters [Astrodon LRGB] are never had discounts so this i can buy anytime when i feel i can afford sooner than later, not in rush, the budget will come, i want to get full set of filters in Astrodon in 1.25" so it will be used for DSO and solar system and i never look back.



#13 PiotrM

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:38 AM

i did use LRGB filters with my mono camera, the one which i use for DSO, i really didn't see a big improvements, in fact there is no improvements at all compared using my Mak without any filters

RGB only doesn't show most of mono sensor advantages. Also bigger aperture will show it even more clearly. So when you upgrade to a big aperture you will see improvements in image from using a mono camera, ADC or IR-passing filters for luminescence channels.
 

which filter i should get to use with a color camera?

None aside a IR/UV cut filter (L filter) if it's not integrated with the camera cover glass.
 

IR-pass there are different bandwidth anyway, i see mostly using 6xxnm up to 7xxnm, not much of 8xxnm, i feel 610nm or 68xnm is more recommended for that with color, or you think this is wrong to go with a color camera?

ASI224 is a specific color camera - it doesn't have IR-cut integrated filter and the sensor also has high and even sensitivity to IR. That's why this specific color camera can use IR-pass filters for IR imaging. It will not work with many other color cameras.
For Mars/Jupiter/Saturn - bright big planets you want as close to visual range as possible to have the best color balance of an LRGB image. If you use like ProPlanet 742 or ProPlanet 801 the resulting IrRGB image on Jupiter will have different, more pinkish color than RGB/LRGB - even though sharpness, detail visibility will be better. Red visual filter or similar Baader IR-Pass are broader than those. Orange and yellow visual filters are even broader. If you use yellow filter it will be more closer to original color balance - but at the expense of being more affected by atmospheric conditions. So you pick a IR-pass filter depending on conditions, planet altitude and planet brightness - as for example ProPlanet 801 can be to dim for Saturn to produce as good image as broader IR-pass.
In short just get few (like yellow, red and ProPlanet alike) and see how they will work. Visual ones are quite cheap. You want to buy a big planetary telescope yet few basic filters are a problem?

ASI290MC is similar to ASI224MC, it also doesn't have integrated IR/UV cut filter and could also be used with an IR-passing filter, but as you have a mono camera already - it will be more efficient at it.


Astrodon aren't necessary, especially if you don't like their premium prices. There is high quality Baader or Astronomik and more. Also note that next year the planets, like Jupiter will be even lower than this year. And when you buy new telescope and equipment you have to learn to use it and catch missing parts to improve. So this year Moon and Uranus are good things to practice.

Edited by PiotrM, 12 August 2018 - 07:38 AM.


#14 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 10:03 AM

RGB only doesn't show most of mono sensor advantages. Also bigger aperture will show it even more clearly. So when you upgrade to a big aperture you will see improvements in image from using a mono camera, ADC or IR-passing filters for luminescence channels.
 
None aside a IR/UV cut filter (L filter) if it's not integrated with the camera cover glass.
 
ASI224 is a specific color camera - it doesn't have IR-cut integrated filter and the sensor also has high and even sensitivity to IR. That's why this specific color camera can use IR-pass filters for IR imaging. It will not work with many other color cameras.
For Mars/Jupiter/Saturn - bright big planets you want as close to visual range as possible to have the best color balance of an LRGB image. If you use like ProPlanet 742 or ProPlanet 801 the resulting IrRGB image on Jupiter will have different, more pinkish color than RGB/LRGB - even though sharpness, detail visibility will be better. Red visual filter or similar Baader IR-Pass are broader than those. Orange and yellow visual filters are even broader. If you use yellow filter it will be more closer to original color balance - but at the expense of being more affected by atmospheric conditions. So you pick a IR-pass filter depending on conditions, planet altitude and planet brightness - as for example ProPlanet 801 can be to dim for Saturn to produce as good image as broader IR-pass.
In short just get few (like yellow, red and ProPlanet alike) and see how they will work. Visual ones are quite cheap. You want to buy a big planetary telescope yet few basic filters are a problem?

ASI290MC is similar to ASI224MC, it also doesn't have integrated IR/UV cut filter and could also be used with an IR-passing filter, but as you have a mono camera already - it will be more efficient at it.


Astrodon aren't necessary, especially if you don't like their premium prices. There is high quality Baader or Astronomik and more. Also note that next year the planets, like Jupiter will be even lower than this year. And when you buy new telescope and equipment you have to learn to use it and catch missing parts to improve. So this year Moon and Uranus are good things to practice.

WOW, can't really wait to buy and have a bigger aperture, i will work hard on that to happen.

 

My camera is a big brother of 224MC, it is 385MC, if you said that 224MC and 290Mc don't have that IR-cut integrated then definitely my color is same, so does that mean i need one then? IR-cut or IR-pass in this case?

 

About visual colored filters, yes, i can buy those esay not a problem, but i really don't know which type of visual filters regardless of the color, i mean how do i know that this filter is visual one or just imaging one, i mean link me to an example one or same of you use then i will try to find it from the store i use, i have OIII and UHC visual filters but i think they are just junk or rubbish, so link me to those visual filters and i will add them to my list and i can buy them even soon once i get a budget soon if necessary.

 

Well, i want to go with Astrodon LRGB because i want to have full set of Astrodon to be used for DSO as well, so this LRGB isn't only for planetary, but also for DSO, as long i am buying a filter wheel of 8x1.25" then i can buy full set, i already have Astrodon Ha 5nm 1.25", i will buy OIII and SII later but after LRGB, so don't worry, i won't buy this expensive only for planetary, and i will buy once, i won't buy ZWO or Baader LRGB and later i buy Astrodon, this is a waste more than buying only Astrodon, i can manage LRGB price of Astrodon not a problem.

 

Don't worry about planets locations in the sky, in my country they are really high enough, even last year they were high enough, so lower position is still high compared to another countries, and i am sure that will not stop people like Peach or Go or those from imaging, they are near to Equator, i am not near but not very far as well, 25N is good enough, and you keep forget that i still have ADC which i didn't use much, but i have it so i am ready anytime.



#15 PiotrM

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 11:54 AM

My camera is a big brother of 224MC, it is 385MC, if you said that 224MC and 290Mc don't have that IR-cut integrated then definitely my color is same, so does that mean i need one then? IR-cut or IR-pass in this case?

Current 385MC also doesn't have IR/UV cut built in so you need such filter (or L from LRGB set). It cuts wavelengths outside of visible spectrum which gives natural color balance. That's the purpose of IR/UV cut filters and color sensors.

About visual colored filters, yes, i can buy those esay not a problem, but i really don't know which type of visual filters regardless of the color, i mean how do i know that this filter is visual one or just imaging one,

Visual filters are based on Wratten colored glass and have numbers. Yellow is #12, orange is #21, red is #25. Similarly for dark red, dark orange etc. Baader, GSO and others make them and are common among astro shops. Just to go to filters section, then visual and you will see them. The numbers aren't always in the product names but they are usually on the filter cell.
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Well, i want to go with Astrodon LRGB because i want to have full set of Astrodon to be used for DSO as well

Other brands are also used for DS imaging. There is no special difference for DSO imaging with Astrodon or any particular brand. There can be edge cases for some setups where there can be a halo around bright stars or bandpass shift due to very fast f/ratio of some astrographs. If you have one narrowband filter from a set then it's handy to complete it but if you don't have LRGB set yet then you aren't bound to Astrodon by that narrowband filter.


The bigger the aperture the more pixels atmospheric dispersion will take and so on. Especially for L visible light channel the planet would have to be nearly or exactly at 90deg.

#16 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 03:49 PM

Current 385MC also doesn't have IR/UV cut built in so you need such filter (or L from LRGB set). It cuts wavelengths outside of visible spectrum which gives natural color balance. That's the purpose of IR/UV cut filters and color sensors.

Visual filters are based on Wratten colored glass and have numbers. Yellow is #12, orange is #21, red is #25. Similarly for dark red, dark orange etc. Baader, GSO and others make them and are common among astro shops. Just to go to filters section, then visual and you will see them. The numbers aren't always in the product names but they are usually on the filter cell.
1e77970a3d835bc7ee928d4f1bba3534_590x590

Other brands are also used for DS imaging. There is no special difference for DSO imaging with Astrodon or any particular brand. There can be edge cases for some setups where there can be a halo around bright stars or bandpass shift due to very fast f/ratio of some astrographs. If you have one narrowband filter from a set then it's handy to complete it but if you don't have LRGB set yet then you aren't bound to Astrodon by that narrowband filter.


The bigger the aperture the more pixels atmospheric dispersion will take and so on. Especially for L visible light channel the planet would have to be nearly or exactly at 90deg.

I buy from this site, so is this the one you mean by visual filter to be used in solar system imaging?

https://www.firstlig...visual-use.html

 

There is few threads here comparing Astrodon to many other brands, and there is one clear thing, Astrodon is always the best, other brands are very good or so so, some getting closer to Astrodon, means Astrodon is on top, why not then, if Astrodon isn't important or necessary then i won't see many members here getting Astrodon or move to Astrodon, so i just follow others here, nothing more, and i have Optolong NB filters already and LRGB at 36mm so i am already set but i want to do the same with Astrodon at 1.25", don't worry if it is expensive, i won't buy them at once, i will take time to move to Astrodon, i bought Ha last year, i may buy LRGB this year, then next year i may add something like OIII first to match Ha, later i can think about anything such as SII or NII or UVenus, i have time to buy stuff one by one, just i don't make myself cheap if others can afford, i maybe can't afford AP mount or AP/Tak scope, but i can definitely afford Astrodon, but let's not stop discussing this too much, if i won't buy Astrodon i might not and go for another options, and that issue you mentioned about Halo is one reason why i try to have high end for minimizing issues, and i know i will buy very fast scope later one day.

 

I can't wait for bigger aperture scope, that will be next year mostly, as i still not sure i will get 16" or 18" or 20", i have to decide carefully, 16" can be afforded sooner, the more i save it will be sooner to get larger scope, then later i can worry about many issues it will come such as atmospheric dispersion, and i saw images of planets amazing mind blowing without this problem at lower degree and not using ADC, so either they are magicians to get rid of that without ADC or they didn't get that AD in original files, i also ask them time to time to learn and see what is the secret, many said they use but some didn't use and said they didn't have problems much, and again, ADC i have already.



#17 PiotrM

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 05:54 PM

I buy from this site, so is this the one you mean by visual filter to be used in solar system imaging?

https://www.firstlig...visual-use.html

Baader is good, although that price... GSO is cheaper.
 

There is few threads here comparing Astrodon to many other brands, and there is one clear thing, Astrodon is always the best

Didn't saw any test that showed that in absolute values that any given filter set is best. People get some filters, do some images with them and then say how those filters performed in their system. They aren't reviewing the filters but their system with the filters as a whole. Plus there is a lot of reason people pick specific RGB sets - like color balance for given sensor. Astrodon has few sets with different characteristics, Baader has a different one, Astronomik or Chroma their own too. Buying by price descending blindly isn't the best solution. If you want Astrodon - go with it - but only when you know and understand that you explicitly need one of their LRGB sets and why. Don't buy just because some other people use it or because it's a premium brand.
 

and i saw images of planets amazing mind blowing without this problem at lower degree and not using ADC

Image processing, IR luminance or narrow bands of RGB filters. There were and still are ways to limit dispersion effect on images. Corrector makes it way easier as well as enables high resolution imaging of broader bands (L-channel for example).

Edited by PiotrM, 12 August 2018 - 05:56 PM.


#18 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:02 PM

Baader is good, although that price... GSO is cheaper.
 
Didn't saw any test that showed that in absolute values that any given filter set is best. People get some filters, do some images with them and then say how those filters performed in their system. They aren't reviewing the filters but their system with the filters as a whole. Plus there is a lot of reason people pick specific RGB sets - like color balance for given sensor. Astrodon has few sets with different characteristics, Baader has a different one, Astronomik or Chroma their own too. Buying by price descending blindly isn't the best solution. If you want Astrodon - go with it - but only when you know and understand that you explicitly need one of their LRGB sets and why. Don't buy just because some other people use it or because it's a premium brand.
 
Image processing, IR luminance or narrow bands of RGB filters. There were and still are ways to limit dispersion effect on images. Corrector makes it way easier as well as enables high resolution imaging of broader bands (L-channel for example).

I can buy from that link, if you know another links then please post them as i don't use OPT, and GSO cheaper so give me all links where i can order from with cheap price and shipping, don't forget that shipping is also a factor, i buy a cheap item then the shipping is more than the item is pointless then, and i won't buy a filter alone, i will buy several items at once, that is why that link i posted to tell me about that filter if correct or not, if i can other items from another site with good shipping price then i will go for it.

 

Ok, Astrodon is in my plan, regardless what you are saying, i am happy with that one Astrodon Ha i have already, so i don't stop going for them, i already have filters so the replacement or better say the second buy must be Astrodon, it won't affect my plans, don't worry, i did read about Astronomik and Chroma and Optolong and Baader and ZWO and even another brand i don't remember the name, Astrobin is full of Astrodon imagers, and definitely i will buy by price and brand name, i can't buy everything of high end names but i can get some, this is not something i must forget, i will afford what i can afford, and i only buy several filters one by one, LRGB Astrodon as a set isn't crazy impossible expensive, they are pricey for reasons, you don't care about reasons or don't believe that is your business, i never read someone had Astrodon and didn't like it, if so then anything else isn't better.

 

Processing is always a fun itself, it is also a skill, important beside taking lights/exposures, without that processing the images won't be that good then, so if processing can solve or reduce issues that is great, but it is not bad to have tools to make life easier, i bought ADC automatically even before you start to comment about my questions first time, so i did right then by getting ADC, i will learn using it by the time, i tried it in visual and i saw the difference, it is easy in visual, while with imaging that needs time, i will learn it, and many recommend me to use Firecapture that will help for ADC, i will come for that too one day, i just asked for curiosity if it can be done without ADC, it is like using kind of filters in photography that sometimes can't be replaced by processing, such as CPL filter, so i think ADC is to correct something can't be done by processing much by your statement?

 

Very very sorry and i apologize posting here in this thread, OP asked about IR-pass, and i wanted to know but we went far, but good i got answers about IR-pass, sounds better to go with visual filter then of Orange/Red/Yellow, thanks and sorry again.



#19 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:06 PM

Maybe i will try or give this site a test, not sure if it is good or bad, from some members it sounds a nice site, they have GSO filters, you can link me to one, is this the right page i linked you to filters?

 

https://agenaastro.c...5_inch/gso.html



#20 PiotrM

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:42 PM

Isn't agenaastro USA shop? In EU you have teleskop-express.de, astroshop.eu, teleskop-austria.at, modernastronomy.com, iankingimaging.com and more. For example:
https://www.teleskop...---Red--25.html

as well as deep IR filters:
https://www.teleskop...ary-Filter.html
https://www.teleskop...ary-Filter.html
https://www.teleskop...hotography.html
https://www.teleskop...hotography.html

#21 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:56 PM

Isn't agenaastro USA shop? In EU you have teleskop-express.de, astroshop.eu, teleskop-austria.at, modernastronomy.com, iankingimaging.com and more. For example:
https://www.teleskop...---Red--25.html

as well as deep IR filters:
https://www.teleskop...ary-Filter.html
https://www.teleskop...ary-Filter.html
https://www.teleskop...hotography.html
https://www.teleskop...hotography.html

Great, isn't it easy to link to options?

 

Agenaastro is a US shop, but they have better shipping options than OPT for me, i used OPT before and i used their cheapest shipping which is USPS and i always had issues with that, and they recommend me to use UPS instead which is really so pricey for me, i use ZWO free shipping and they are better handling shipping items, and also another site in Hong Kong, free shipping for items above $150-200 for me, i do use B&H and Adorama which are also US shops and have good shipping options or reasonable prices, so i will check all stores around on the net about those filters and see which one i can get with overall prices [not necessary the cheapest if service is bad then].

 

Thank you very much!



#22 The_8_Bit_Zombie

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 07:59 PM

Visual filters are based on Wratten colored glass and have numbers. Yellow is #12, orange is #21, red is #25. Similarly for dark red, dark orange etc. Baader, GSO and others make them and are common among astro shops. Just to go to filters section, then visual and you will see them. The numbers aren't always in the product names but they are usually on the filter cell.

I have a question about the red #25 if you don't mind; Is it just for visual use, or does it also help with lunar (or planetary) imaging? I found a red #25 filter that's only $10, so I figure I might as well get one if it's a useful addition alongside IR filters.



#23 TareqPhoto

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Posted 12 August 2018 - 08:17 PM

I have a question about the red #25 if you don't mind; Is it just for visual use, or does it also help with lunar (or planetary) imaging? I found a red #25 filter that's only $10, so I figure I might as well get one if it's a useful addition alongside IR filters.

All the posts or discussion i did was about imaging, so his recommendation of those visual filters are for imaging too.


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#24 PiotrM

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 01:26 AM

I have a question about the red #25 if you don't mind; Is it just for visual use, or does it also help with lunar (or planetary) imaging? I found a red #25 filter that's only $10, so I figure I might as well get one if it's a useful addition alongside IR filters.

Yellow, orange, dark orange, red, dark red visual filters are longpass filters just like IR-passing filters:

redfilter1b.gif

They just pass more and more visible light as you move from red to yellow. Their advantage is that they are much brighter (wider band) and if conditions aren't horrible they will allow a good high SNR capture and if used for LRGB type image as L channel - give more natural colors. Red and dark red are good for general IR imaging (Moon, Uranus likely) while yellow and orange could also be tried for Mars, Saturn, Jupiter. Dark red should be similar to Baader IR-pass.

bands.jpg
comparison.jpg
alljup-2337-0000.png

Edited by PiotrM, 13 August 2018 - 01:32 AM.

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#25 The_8_Bit_Zombie

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Posted 27 August 2018 - 03:53 PM

Once again, thanks for all the help everyone! Because Uranus and Neptune season is coming, I've decided on a 610nm filter and a Red #25 filter for now. I will also get either the 685nm or the 742nm at some point soon.

 

Yellow, orange, dark orange, red, dark red visual filters are longpass filters just like IR-passing filters:

They just pass more and more visible light as you move from red to yellow. Their advantage is that they are much brighter (wider band) and if conditions aren't horrible they will allow a good high SNR capture and if used for LRGB type image as L channel - give more natural colors. Red and dark red are good for general IR imaging (Moon, Uranus likely) while yellow and orange could also be tried for Mars, Saturn, Jupiter. Dark red should be similar to Baader IR-pass.
 

Great thank you! Those comparisons are really helpful, thanks for sharing.




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