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The Skywatcher 100 ED APO thread ...

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#26 wprince

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 01:17 PM

I have the SW ED100, and like many others have said it has very good if not "ultra premium" optics.  I never owned or have tried a Takahashi or other premium refractor scopes of similar aperture, so I have no basis of comparison.  But I imagine what you pay for and generally receive with the "ultra premium" scopes is even smoother glass and even better correction (SA and CA), and possibly better mechanicals.

  

I really like my ED100, the only issues I had were slightly pinched optics and a sometimes slipping Crayford focuser.  With the pointers and posts I've seen here on the CN forums, I was able to fix both issues myself.  I've also said this before, but my scope seems to work better with a prism diagonal because the prism seems to reduce the slight excess red fringe I see in images of some bright objects (like planets).


Edited by wprince, 10 August 2018 - 01:18 PM.

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#27 barbie

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 01:36 PM

I'll say this in favor of my Synta ED100, it split Antares.  My Takahashi and Vixen apos never could, even on nights when it was eminently possible!!


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#28 jay.i

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 01:49 PM

I'll say this in favor of my Synta ED100, it split Antares.  My Takahashi and Vixen apos never could, even on nights when it was eminently possible!!

Sounds like a fluke to me. Unless you're talking about an FS60CB or Sky90 or something (with the reputations of being less well-corrected than the rest of their refractors), I would expect a run of the mill (read: excellent) Takahashi to be able to split Antares. At 3.3" of separation, even a 60mm scope (Dawes limit of 1.93") can resolve it to the point of clear separation as long as enough energy is put into the Airy disc and not the diffraction rings (and as long as the optics are collimated, tube is baffled, etc). If I had an FC100* and a SW100ED next to each other one the same night with just as much cooldown between them, and I could split Antares in the SW but not the Tak, swapping diagonals and matching magnification as much as possible, I would be baffled and a little upset and would be engaging customer support for the Tak. I'm not saying a SW100ED can't split Antares, but if your Tak couldn't under great conditions, then I'm inclined to think something was wrong, with the scope or something else.


Edited by jay.i, 10 August 2018 - 01:50 PM.

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#29 barbie

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Posted 10 August 2018 - 07:20 PM

Sounds like a fluke to me. Unless you're talking about an FS60CB or Sky90 or something (with the reputations of being less well-corrected than the rest of their refractors), I would expect a run of the mill (read: excellent) Takahashi to be able to split Antares. At 3.3" of separation, even a 60mm scope (Dawes limit of 1.93") can resolve it to the point of clear separation as long as enough energy is put into the Airy disc and not the diffraction rings (and as long as the optics are collimated, tube is baffled, etc). If I had an FC100* and a SW100ED next to each other one the same night with just as much cooldown between them, and I could split Antares in the SW but not the Tak, swapping diagonals and matching magnification as much as possible, I would be baffled and a little upset and would be engaging customer support for the Tak. I'm not saying a SW100ED can't split Antares, but if your Tak couldn't under great conditions, then I'm inclined to think something was wrong, with the scope or something else.

The only thing wrong with the Tak and Vixen are their prices!lol.gif They we're good scopes, just not as good as the Ed100.  BTW, this is my second ED 100.  The first one was excellent as well!


Edited by barbie, 10 August 2018 - 07:36 PM.

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#30 Jacques

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Posted 11 August 2018 - 01:43 PM

P1010022.JPG Here is mine


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#31 cam1936

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Posted 13 August 2018 - 12:11 AM

Despite some praise of the nice feel and finish the 80 mm Equinox somehow managed to get poorer reviews of the optical performance than the ED80, possibly due to its significantly faster focal ratio (f/6.25 vs. f/7.5). When paying a substantial premium for a mechanically better made and nicer looking telescope as an upgrade to the slightly "agricultural-feel" Synta ED scope, people naturally expect performance to be at least on par with the cheaper alternative. The lacklustre reviews of the 80 mm equinox at least kept me away fro me buying one, and I'm probably not the only one.

But I completely agree, the ED line (80-100-120 and recent 150 mm) scopes are probably among the best bargains in the market for entry-level EDs today.


I recently picked up an 80mm Equinox. Haven't got it under the stars yet though.

I have also seen reports that it is not quite as good as the f/7.5 ED80; but I've seen some reports and tests that appear to show that it's just the difference between f/6.25 and f/7.5. Trade some correction for a faster focal ratio. Maybe not worth it for visual??? It sure is a compact and nice package though.

I guess I'll have to be my own judge! I'm excited to drop in the 35mm Pan and witness the widefield views.
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#32 RJF-Astro

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 04:15 PM

Here is another report from a happy SW100ED owner. I have the scope for over a month now. It is my second scope, the first being a Orion 90mm mak. I use it mainly for astrophotography and the occasional visual. 

 

I really like the optics. They are crisp and clear compared to the mak (as it should be considering the price difference). The supplied diagonal and eyepiece are nice enough. I didn't like the supplied 9x50 straight through finder tough. I also have an Orion 6x30 RA finder and I find it much more comfterable to use. But I mostly use GoTo on my HEQ-5 for finding targets and then swith to the camera for alignment.

 

I did find a part that screws on the 9x50 finder and has a T-thread. Now I have mounted a ZWO ASI 120 on it and it makes a great, relatively cheap guidescope.

 

Another supplied item was the focal length reducer/flattener. It is good enough. Two things I do not like: you cannot rotate it (and the camera with it) and it does not cover the sensor of my Nikon D750 full frame. Although I have read that not many 2" setups will. I already had the D750 for daytime use, but I would recommend APS for this setup.

 

A final note about the crayford focusser. I have read negative reports about slipping. I have not experienced this at all yet. The D750 stays perfectly focussed during long sessions.

 

You can see some first results through this scope here https://photos.app.g...N2VVJuBosDhfbC8 , please bear in mind though that I have only been doing this for a month now and the learning curve is high ;) 

 

 


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#33 barbie

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Posted 18 August 2018 - 09:50 PM

I haven't had any problems with my focuser either.


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#34 zakry3323

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 11:00 PM

I dislike the focuser, twice now the locking bolt has fallen out! The bolt hole seems to be wallered out and I'm thinking of making an upgrade to a moonlight. 



#35 barbie

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 11:26 PM

I STILL haven't had any problems with my focuser and am NOT planning to upgrade.  The stock unit works perfectly for my intended usage.


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#36 Castor

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 02:04 AM

attachicon.gif P1010022.JPG Here is mine

 

Your White series Sky-Watcher 100ED looks really nice, it’s a shame these are no longer made!

 

 When I was looking for an affordable 100mm f/9 ED refractor, I wanted one with a white tube (nothing wrong with the black diamond version, I like them too!) but none was available from Sky-Watcher so I went for the Vixen version with the white dual-speed Crayford focuser and I'm very happy with it!

 

Here is a picture of my Vixen ED100Sf f/9.  I know it’s not a Sky-Watcher, but it's the same OTA made by Synta!

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  • Vixen-ED100Sf+Baader-Clicklock-Diagonal+Gibraltar5-mount-927x1545_165842.jpg

Edited by Castor, 05 November 2018 - 02:11 AM.

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#37 SeattleScott

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 02:13 AM

I had the original Orion version with single speed focuser. When I upgraded to heavy 2” eyepieces, I found the focus would slip when viewing near zenith. There was a focus lock, but it would just lock the focus, not increase tension until slippage stopped. Maybe there was another way to adjust tension that I didn’t know about? Don’t have the scope anymore. I think the newer SW version has a different focuser anyway.

Focusers can be a very personal thing. My first real scope was a Meade Schmidt Newt so early on, my expectations were slightly higher than the elevation of Venice. So I tolerated the slippage without worrying too much about it. Now I had dual speed focus on all my scopes until a couple days ago when another joined the herd. Haven’t gotten it under the stars yet but I noticed a tiny bit of backlash. Not really enough to affect operation, just enough to be annoying to someone spoiled by smooth focusing. I was able to tighten a couple screws and eliminate the backlash. Ten years ago I wouldn’t of thought anything of it, nor would I have known how to fix it. For the record, I don’t own any premium focusers like Moonlite or Feathertouch.

All this is basically to say that a stock focuser may seem perfectly fine to a person used to stock focusers but not so great to someone used to premium focusers. Kind of like the reviews I read of the Vixen ED103S when I got one; a number of folks posted that they upgraded the focuser because the stock one didn’t do justice to the optics. It wasn’t that the stock focuser was faulty. They just wanted a premium focuser for their premium lens. So a lot is really about what one is accustomed to.

Scott

Edited by SeattleScott, 05 November 2018 - 02:16 AM.

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#38 Kashmir

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 03:26 AM

I had an ED100 pro for a number of years and the optics were very good, I recall the planetary views as being some of the best I have seen through any scope. Pinpoint stars and sharp very close out to the edge and minimal CA with just the occasional flash on very bright objects normally gone when focussed. All in all very good performance. The focusser was the weak point and it got to the point of being unusable so I swapped it out for a Moonlite. This was a significant and expensive upgrade with the downside being that not enough back focus for my Baader mk3 zoom and you then needed an adapter to use the reducer. I sold it on eventually as 100mm felt a bit awkward, a little to big for grab n go to a dark site where the Equinox 80 was better for travel and not enough aperture for DSO where my F5 6 inch reflector outperformed it. 

Nevertheless if your optics and focusser are good and it fits your requirements its ahead of anything else in the price bracket and whilst your Taks, Vixens and TVs might pull ahead it will only be by a small amount and at 3 or 4 times the cost. 


Edited by Kashmir, 05 November 2018 - 03:27 AM.

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#39 Jacques

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:50 AM

Your White series Sky-Watcher 100ED looks really nice, it’s a shame these are no longer made!

 

 When I was looking for an affordable 100mm f/9 ED refractor, I wanted one with a white tube (nothing wrong with the black diamond version, I like them too!) but none was available from Sky-Watcher so I went for the Vixen version with the white dual-speed Crayford focuser and I'm very happy with it!

 

Here is a picture of my Vixen ED100Sf f/9.  I know it’s not a Sky-Watcher, but it's the same OTA made by Synta!

Thankssmile.gif  Your SF looks neat too. There are actually quite a few around over here and in The Netherlands, they were intended for the French market I believe 


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#40 RJF-Astro

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 03:48 PM

I like the white scopes! 

 

...

Another supplied item was the focal length reducer/flattener. It is good enough. Two things I do not like: you cannot rotate it (and the camera with it) and it does not cover the sensor of my Nikon D750 full frame. Although I have read that not many 2" setups will. I already had the D750 for daytime use, but I would recommend APS for this setup.

...

I need to correct my earlier post about the flattener/reducer. It seemed I have used the wrong adapter, which gave me a backfocus problem and field curvature on the edges. Now I have the right adapter and the result is much beter. There is still some field curvature at the edge of the full frame, but not nearly as much. 

 

If you look closely at this stretched sub of M45, you can see the stars on the edge are not perfect:

 

M45_LIGHT_150s_400iso_2_20181103-23h01m17s105ms.jpg

 

So M45 is doable but maybe a 80mm or 72mm is a better choice. With smaller targets there is plenty of room to work with though. I also bought a nosepiece adapter from First Light Optics for the flattener/reducer so I can rotate it, which is a nice addition.


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#41 25585

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 04:53 PM

I own the fairly rare SW Equinox version. Like all Equinox models it is completely black flake CNC tube, has a retractable dew shield, and has a 2 speed focuser. It has big chunky CNC rings and a Vixen bar, both strong enough (but my clamp is a 3 grip 450mm)

 

I mount the 100 on my Skytee 2 alt az. It performs well at the magnifications I go up to, 150x maximum. A 9mm Baader Morpheus gives 100x, and the shortest I use is a Baader 6.5mm. Finder eyepiece is an Antares 40mm Erfle, fine at F9. I use a red circle finder and a SW RACI 9x50.

 

How does use compare to my Tak 100mm F9 DL?  The Tak is a lot lighter, but the Equinox gets more use as its more solid. Equinoxes have a scale on top of their long focuser tubes which is useful for reference using different accessories, and the micro knob comes in useful too. Both Equinox dials are OK for my use, though the 120 has been given a Moonlite, which is stronger but heavier. Might get a Baader Steeltrak if I upgrade the 100.

 

The Tak I normally keep with its Q1.6x extender attached as a 1440mm F14.4 Flourite, but the SW at F9 900mm. Not much CA, but the Tak has zero to my aging eyes, however between the both of them, its no big deal until an object starts to fill over half of the view - a zoom is good for switching between scopes for quick comparison.

 

Why keep the SW? Its more G&G than the Tak, on account of replaceability. Similarily the Equinox can be used as an outreach scope, and she has a glam look that goes with a sparkly night sky. 


Edited by 25585, 05 November 2018 - 04:56 PM.

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#42 Castor

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:23 PM

Thankssmile.gif  Your SF looks neat too. There are actually quite a few around over here and in The Netherlands, they were intended for the French market I believe 

 

Thank you Jacques, I didn’t know about the white Sky-Watcher ED100 version being marketed as a series for parts of Europe, they look like the current SW Esprit, nice! waytogo.gif 



#43 Castor

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:04 PM

I own the fairly rare SW Equinox version. Like all Equinox models it is completely black flake CNC tube, has a retractable dew shield, and has a 2 speed focuser. It has big chunky CNC rings and a Vixen bar, both strong enough [...]

 

[...] Why keep the SW? Its more G&G than the Tak, on account of replaceability. Similarily the Equinox can be used as an outreach scope, and she has a glam look that goes with a sparkly night sky. 

 

Hi 25585,

 

In my book, with the Equinox model for each of your Sky-Watcher EDs you have the best of the best from their doublet refractors, something difficult to achieve today and you should congratulate yourself for being patient and constant in pursuing your goals, Kudos! waytogo.gif

 

I am very happy with my ED100Sf f/9 for casual planetary/double star observing, but on more than one occasion I have flirted with the idea of acquiring the SW 120ED because it has more reach than a 4-inch but it’s lighter than a 5-inch.  Luckily bad timing and shortage of funds have prevented me from making the jump, because I don’t know where I would find the time to use it considering that I already have multiple scopes that demand attention and so very few clear nights to observe with them! question.gif

 

And yet, I still feel the pull of the Sky-Watcher 120ED … meditation.gif

 

… Fortunately I came to my senses (for now) and my last telescope purchases were oriented toward small scopes that are quick to setup and easy to use even as I enter into the golden years! gramps.gif

 

Cheers,


Edited by Castor, 05 November 2018 - 10:06 PM.

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#44 SteveG

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 11:44 PM

I have an early Orion version that I purchased used for $385. It easily outperformed a Meade 5" f9 achro that I had. The tube assembly is incredibly lightweight, and the optics on mine are excellent. I see only the tiniest hint of color on the brightest targets, but none really on Jupiter.

 

I reworked my single-speed focuser from some Crayford instructions I found here at CN, and the focuser can now lift a 2" diagonal and ES 14/100 eyepiece vertically. I cooled the focuser in my freezer to ensure it would still lift the weight. The wheel is buttery smooth as well.

 

My ugly grey scope sits on an old Vixen Polaris mount, and I'm using a small single axis motor drive. I've been considering selling this setup but after reading this post I'm changing my mind! It could be a fun, refinish project.

 

Optically, my ED120 is very similar, but about 20% brighter and higher resolution on all targets (go figure). I don't find the tube length to be problematic. When I fold the legs up, I can place the scope and mount fully assembled in the back seat of my car.

 

IMG_5238.JPG


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#45 Grounddweller

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 09:40 AM

Your White series Sky-Watcher 100ED looks really nice, it’s a shame these are no longer made!

 

 When I was looking for an affordable 100mm f/9 ED refractor, I wanted one with a white tube (nothing wrong with the black diamond version, I like them too!) but none was available from Sky-Watcher so I went for the Vixen version with the white dual-speed Crayford focuser and I'm very happy with it!

 

Here is a picture of my Vixen ED100Sf f/9.  I know it’s not a Sky-Watcher, but it's the same OTA made by Synta!

 Yours is the tripod setup I want to put together! Is that the Gibraltar or Panoramic mount that you have it on? I have the Panoramic with SkyTour and I need to find the right ring to hold the SW100 firmly in place to use. I bought an older TV clamshell and lined it with some high- density foam but the foam loses some mass in the colder evenings and doesn’t hold it firmly. I want to be able to swap it out with my Pronto when I want to punch through to some deeper DSOs  

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • E86E60D1-8727-45B6-9467-D7D8EC43F2DB.jpeg

Edited by Grounddweller, 06 November 2018 - 09:51 AM.

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#46 Castor

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 09:00 PM

 Yours is the tripod setup I want to put together! Is that the Gibraltar or Panoramic mount that you have it on? I have the Panoramic with SkyTour and I need to find the right ring to hold the SW100 firmly in place to use. I bought an older TV clamshell and lined it with some high- density foam but the foam loses some mass in the colder evenings and doesn’t hold it firmly. I want to be able to swap it out with my Pronto when I want to punch through to some deeper DSOs  

 

Hi Grounddweller, Welcome to Cloudy Nights and thanks for sharing the picture of your sweet scopes! love.gif

 

To answer your question, I use a Gibraltar5 mount with my ED100Sf and Tele Vue 4-inch Rings!

 

My original plan was to get a TV-102, but it was discontinued before I got a chance to buy one, so I purchased the Vixen ED100Sf f/9 instead to fill its place with the hope that someday I would find a nice, used TV-102 and I would simply switch scopes and use all the accessories acquired for the Vixen on the Tele Vue.  That’s why I didn’t mind about splurging for a TV 4” Mount Ring Set for 4-inch outside diameter tubes (MRS-4011) and Quick-Release Finder Mount (QFM-1008) for my modest ED100Sf scope.  In order to fit 102mm I.D. rings on a 100mm O.D. tube, I added an extra layer of thick self-adhesive felt (sold for furniture) to the rings and they worked perfectly!  In the 5 years that have elapsed since I installed the rings, they are as tight on the scope as day one, no slippage at all.  IMO a 4” clamshell ring, even the one made by Tele Vue for TV scopes, is not ideal to hold firmly a long focal length refractor like the TV-102 (for high magnification observing), or a SW 100ED for that matter, and it would be better served by a 4” Mount Ring Set.  Even if I was never able to purchase the TV-102 that I wanted, I’m happy that I got the TV rings for my ED100Sf and I’m very pleased using this scope on my Tele Vue mount for casual planetary and double star observing!

 

Here are a couple of links for the Tele Vue 4” Mount Ring Set:

http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_page.asp?id=107&Tab=_Sets

 

https://www.astronomics.com/p/mounting-ring-set-for-4-refractors.html

 

Here is also a link to an old post that I made when I upgraded the rings of my ED100Sf to use the scope on my Gibraltar5 Mount:

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/430081-vixen-ed100sftelevue-mrs-4011-rings-on-gibraltar5/

 

I think that with the correct mounting plate, you could use the rings that you already have for your SW 100ED on a Tele Vue mount.  For example, you could just order a Tele Vue Gib-5 Bottom Plate (BPL-1098, also known as NP127 Bottom Plate) that normally comes included with the TV Ring Sets and is pre-drilled for TV scopes and mounts, attach your rings to it with single 1/4”-20 cap screws and then place the scope with rings and plate on the top of the cradle of a TV Gibraltar Mount and fasten it with 1/4”-20 hand knobs (included with the mount).  Here are a couple of links for the TV Bottom Plate:

 

http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_page.asp?id=43&Tab=_bpl

 

https://optcorp.com/products/te-bpl-1098-np127is-bottom-plate

 

 

Regarding the mount, I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but IME a TV Panoramic mount would not be sufficiently stable for observing with a 100ED f/9 refractor.  I use a TV-85 scope on a Panoramic mount all the time and I feel that the mount is already at the limit for optimal viewing!  If you want to use your scope on a Tele Vue mount, I would strongly recommend a Gibraltar5 mount as an effective viewing platform -a regular Gibraltar (HD4) mount would probably be the minimum acceptable mount from Tele Vue for your scope.  Here are some links to posts that I have written about my Gibraltar5 and Panoramic mounts where you can also find more pictures of the ED100Sf setup on the TV mount:

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/634367-tele-vue-gibraltar5-and-panoramictele-podgibraltar-mount-cradle-sizedimensions/

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/637456-tele-vue-mount-handle-for-gibraltar5-gibraltar-and-older-panoramictele-pod-mounts-pictures/

 

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/603410-tele-vue-gibraltar5-and-panoramic-mounts-with-nexus-dsc-pictures/

 

 

This is probably not what you wanted to hear, but I prefer to be honest with you so you don’t incur in expenses that you might regret later!

 

 

Best of luck and please let me know if I can help! smile.gif 


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#47 25585

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 03:28 PM

Hi 25585,

 

In my book, with the Equinox model for each of your Sky-Watcher EDs you have the best of the best from their doublet refractors, something difficult to achieve today and you should congratulate yourself for being patient and constant in pursuing your goals, Kudos! waytogo.gif

 

I am very happy with my ED100Sf f/9 for casual planetary/double star observing, but on more than one occasion I have flirted with the idea of acquiring the SW 120ED because it has more reach than a 4-inch but it’s lighter than a 5-inch.  Luckily bad timing and shortage of funds have prevented me from making the jump, because I don’t know where I would find the time to use it considering that I already have multiple scopes that demand attention and so very few clear nights to observe with them! question.gif

 

And yet, I still feel the pull of the Sky-Watcher 120ED … meditation.gif

 

… Fortunately I came to my senses (for now) and my last telescope purchases were oriented toward small scopes that are quick to setup and easy to use even as I enter into the golden years! gramps.gif

 

Cheers,

The 120 was the only one I bought new, about a year ago. Then the 100 at a bargain price was irresistible. 80 & 66 were like completing a family. I am fond of "baby" 66.

 

But "Ma" 100 is lighter enough than "Pa" 120 to make a difference. They might live on the other side of the tracks than my Tak and Tele Vues, but the Equinoxes are a great family! 

 

Seriously, the 120 is worth upgrading to for proven optical excellence at great value, it will not overburden a mount that can take your 100. Where the 120 scores is that you will see more and brighter. Not hugely but enough to be noticable. A UHC filter will show nebulae brighter. Open clusters are better light shows, globulars and planetaries are easier to locate. Jupiter's moons are more fun to watch. So more eye candy to see in the cosmos. 

 

But try out somebody's 120 next to your 100 first, they are both great scopes, I won't part with either of mine. 


Edited by 25585, 07 November 2018 - 03:49 PM.

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#48 Castor

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Posted 07 November 2018 - 05:01 PM

The 120 was the only one I bought new, about a year ago. Then the 100 at a bargain price was irresistible. 80 & 66 were like completing a family. I am fond of "baby" 66.

 

But "Ma" 100 is lighter enough than "Pa" 120 to make a difference. They might live on the other side of the tracks than my Tak and Tele Vues, but the Equinoxes are a great family! 

 

Seriously, the 120 is worth upgrading to for proven optical excellence at great value, it will not overburden a mount that can take your 100. Where the 120 scores is that you will see more and brighter. Not hugely but enough to be noticable. A UHC filter will show nebulae brighter. Open clusters are better light shows, globulars and planetaries are easier to locate. Jupiter's moons are more fun to watch. So more eye candy to see in the cosmos. 

 

But try out somebody's 120 next to your 100 first, they are both great scopes, I won't part with either of mine. 

Oh, I believe everything that you say about the Sky-Watcher 120EDs given my positive experience with the ED100Sf and I can extrapolate the “more goodness” factor of having 20mm extra with same tube length and only a few pounds more of weight! ubetcha.gif

 

Unfortunately, my viewing “space time” is limited and last time I checked my wallet fell into a black hole, ha, ha! lol.gif

 

Thanks to all for the good advice! waytogo.gif 


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#49 Terra Nova

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 11:47 AM

Sounds like a fluke to me. Unless you're talking about an FS60CB or Sky90 or something (with the reputations of being less well-corrected than the rest of their refractors), I would expect a run of the mill (read: excellent) Takahashi to be able to split Antares. At 3.3" of separation, even a 60mm scope (Dawes limit of 1.93") can resolve it to the point of clear separation as long as enough energy is put into the Airy disc and not the diffraction rings (and as long as the optics are collimated, tube is baffled, etc). If I had an FC100* and a SW100ED next to each other one the same night with just as much cooldown between them, and I could split Antares in the SW but not the Tak, swapping diagonals and matching magnification as much as possible, I would be baffled and a little upset and would be engaging customer support for the Tak. I'm not saying a SW100ED can't split Antares, but if your Tak couldn't under great conditions, then I'm inclined to think something was wrong, with the scope or something else.

It’s not so much the angular separation of about ~3” (it does change slightly over a period of four or five years) that makes Antares a somewhat difficult double star to split, it is the difference in brightness between it (~ mag. 1, (it too changes slightly over time)) and its companion (mag. 5.4). This makes it increasingly difficult to split when aperture falls below 6”.


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#50 25585

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:02 PM

Sounds like a fluke to me. Unless you're talking about an FS60CB or Sky90 or something (with the reputations of being less well-corrected than the rest of their refractors), I would expect a run of the mill (read: excellent) Takahashi to be able to split Antares. At 3.3" of separation, even a 60mm scope (Dawes limit of 1.93") can resolve it to the point of clear separation as long as enough energy is put into the Airy disc and not the diffraction rings (and as long as the optics are collimated, tube is baffled, etc). If I had an FC100* and a SW100ED next to each other one the same night with just as much cooldown between them, and I could split Antares in the SW but not the Tak, swapping diagonals and matching magnification as much as possible, I would be baffled and a little upset and would be engaging customer support for the Tak. I'm not saying a SW100ED can't split Antares, but if your Tak couldn't under great conditions, then I'm inclined to think something was wrong, with the scope or something else.

Right! That is a comparison for me to do. FC100DL v 100 Equinox. Split Antares. axe.gif


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