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The Skywatcher 100 ED APO thread ...

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783 replies to this topic

#776 PKDfan

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Posted Today, 02:34 PM

Hi Soundboy 121! Agena Astro products has a Baader clicklock (m56thread) that screws onto the tube instead of the marring screws of the stock VB. Runs 104$us plus shipping.
I'm in the process of getting the funds to get this crucial item.
Goodluck with our 100ED!

Clear 100ED skies & Good seeing

Edited by PKDfan, Today, 02:37 PM.

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#777 eyespy

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Posted Today, 03:36 PM

Hi Soundboy 121,

 

As I only use 1.25” eyepieces and wanted to replace the stock 100ED adaptor that uses a thumb screw, I started looking for alternatives.  Antares makes a great 2” to 1.25” adaptor that uses an internal collar to grip the diagonal and causes no damage at all.  It is a similar collar to that which TAK uses in its 1.25” diagonal prism for gripping eyepieces.

 

Enjoy your 100ED !

 

Doug.....


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#778 mondo1948

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Posted Today, 04:23 PM

Hello Folks,

I recently acquired the SW 100 ED scope and find it a great instrument!  I decided to get a WO binoviewer for it and have had several recommendations regarding eyepieces.  One friend I met on CN uses  pairs of ES 82* eyepieces in his Denk binoviewer... 8.8mm and 14mm.  Of course, based on his recommendation, I'd love to follow his lead, but I'm not sure I want to spend $800.00 on those eyepieces.  Another friend suggested using a pair of Baader Hyperion 8-24mm zoom eyepieces.....I already have 1, so adding a second would only cost $300.00.  

 

I read somewhere that adding those two zooms to the WO binoviewer may be a problem in that they are wide and I might not be able to get my nose between them.  Another comment I heard was that with all the weight of the WO binoviewer and two zooms, I might put too much strain on the Crayford focuser and cause it to fail.  Obviously, I wouldn't want to buy another Baader zoom, just to encounter problems.

 

So, my question is, are these potential problems real or are many people using two Baader zooms in their WO binoviewer?  As we all know, some problems can be rare and others can be disastrous.

 

Thanks in advance for any feedback,

Mondo

 

 



#779 BlueMoon

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Posted Today, 05:21 PM

Assuming you have the newer Baader zoom, the Mark IV, which has a smaller diameter than the previous models, you should be able to get the interocular distance set ok. I owned both the WO binoviewer and the older Baader model and It would have been pretty difficult to accommodate a pair of those. I used my binos with fixed focal length eye pieces not having the second zoom.

However, let's look at the weight, a WO bino is 18.3 oz, a Baader zoom is 10.2 oz x 2. Total weight = 2 lbs. 6.7oz. That a fair amount of weight to place on the end of the tube. So, you'll want to be sure your focuser and your mount are up to the task.

 

Clear skies.



#780 Soundboy121

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Posted Today, 05:56 PM

@eyespy. I totally forgot I have the Antares SCT to 2inch one for my Nexstar and SW127 ....
I went ahead and ordered from Scope Stuff their version
Thank You fellow 100 ers for yer input

#781 mondo1948

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Posted Today, 06:04 PM

Assuming you have the newer Baader zoom, the Mark IV, which has a smaller diameter than the previous models, you should be able to get the interocular distance set ok. I owned both the WO binoviewer and the older Baader model and It would have been pretty difficult to accommodate a pair of those. I used my binos with fixed focal length eye pieces not having the second zoom.

However, let's look at the weight, a WO bino is 18.3 oz, a Baader zoom is 10.2 oz x 2. Total weight = 2 lbs. 6.7oz. That a fair amount of weight to place on the end of the tube. So, you'll want to be sure your focuser and your mount are up to the task.

 

Clear skies.

I realize the weight is substantial, but how would I know if my focuser and mount are "up to the task", as you mentioned?  The weight of an ES 14mm, 82* eyepiece, like I mentioned that my friend uses, is 9 oz....only 1.2 oz. less than the Baader zoom, so I'd only be saving 2.4oz if I used them rather than the two zooms.



#782 BlueMoon

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Posted Today, 06:57 PM

I realize the weight is substantial, but how would I know if my focuser and mount are "up to the task", as you mentioned?  The weight of an ES 14mm, 82* eyepiece, like I mentioned that my friend uses, is 9 oz....only 1.2 oz. less than the Baader zoom, so I'd only be saving 2.4oz if I used them rather than the two zooms.

There are two schools of thought on this. The problem comes when you are observing at altitude angles above 60* or so. The draw tube in the Synta may slip with that much weight. Some folks suggest that "tuning up" the Synta may help abate the problem. I tried it on my Synta and it didn't help much. The other way to deal with it is to replace the stock focuser with a GSO linear bearing style that can take the weight without slipping. On my 100 that's the route that I took. I replaced my Synta with a ScopeStuff branded GSO linear bearing, the FRL3: http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_frl2.htm The upside is that I never had any problems with my binos slipping after that. The downside is that the drawtube is 2" shorter than the Synta so if I wanted to use a single eye piece, I needed to add a 2" extension so I had enough focus travel.

 

As for the mount, when you have a heavy weight on the focuser end, no matter what type of eye piece you use. you'll need to extend the objective end further away from the pivot center of the mount to balance the scope on the altitude axis. That creates a longer moment arm and introduces oscillations, or "the shakes". An alt/az mount, unless it's beefy like a Losmandy AZ8 or Stellarvue M2C, won't dampen the shakes as well with that longer moment arm. If your using a GEM like a EQ-4 or lighter you'll have a similar problem. At low mags, like 24mm it won't be so noticeable. But the higher in magnification you go, the more noticeable, and annoying it becomes.

 

So, all said, you pretty much have to try it and see how your particular hardware bears up. Sorry that it's a bit long-winded but using binos does introduce some potential issues to solve.

 

Clear skies.



#783 mondo1948

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Posted Today, 07:17 PM

There are two schools of thought on this. The problem comes when you are observing at altitude angles above 60* or so. The draw tube in the Synta may slip with that much weight. Some folks suggest that "tuning up" the Synta may help abate the problem. I tried it on my Synta and it didn't help much. The other way to deal with it is to replace the stock focuser with a GSO linear bearing style that can take the weight without slipping. On my 100 that's the route that I took. I replaced my Synta with a ScopeStuff branded GSO linear bearing, the FRL3: http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_frl2.htm The upside is that I never had any problems with my binos slipping after that. The downside is that the drawtube is 2" shorter than the Synta so if I wanted to use a single eye piece, I needed to add a 2" extension so I had enough focus travel.

 

As for the mount, when you have a heavy weight on the focuser end, no matter what type of eye piece you use. you'll need to extend the objective end further away from the pivot center of the mount to balance the scope on the altitude axis. That creates a longer moment arm and introduces oscillations, or "the shakes". An alt/az mount, unless it's beefy like a Losmandy AZ8 or Stellarvue M2C, won't dampen the shakes as well with that longer moment arm. If your using a GEM like a EQ-4 or lighter you'll have a similar problem. At low mags, like 24mm it won't be so noticeable. But the higher in magnification you go, the more noticeable, and annoying it becomes.

 

So, all said, you pretty much have to try it and see how your particular hardware bears up. Sorry that it's a bit long-winded but using binos does introduce some potential issues to solve.

 

Clear skies.

Thanks for the thoughtful and educational response!  Since I'm using a Porta II mount, I think you're right....that by moving the OTA away from the focuser end, which I did to balance the scope with the binoviewer, I will probably get oscillations or the "shakes", as you mentioned.  I think the answer is that I stay away from using the two zooms and instead go with lighter individual eyepieces, like the 3.2oz. ones that WO includes with the binoviewer.  The good news is that I've been reading about which eyepieces other people use in the WO bino and some are very light and should help me avoid problems.  

 

Again, thanks for your input.

Mondo


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#784 BlueMoon

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Posted Today, 07:36 PM

Thanks for the thoughtful and educational response!  Since I'm using a Porta II mount, I think you're right....that by moving the OTA away from the focuser end, which I did to balance the scope with the binoviewer, I will probably get oscillations or the "shakes", as you mentioned.  I think the answer is that I stay away from using the two zooms and instead go with lighter individual eyepieces, like the 3.2oz. ones that WO includes with the binoviewer.  The good news is that I've been reading about which eyepieces other people use in the WO bino and some are very light and should help me avoid problems.  

 

Again, thanks for your input.

Mondo

You are welcome. The situation you describe is exactly where I was. I used a Porta II on its stock tripod, mounted it on my EQ-4 steel leg (which is always rock solid), tried additional weights on the tripod and counter-balancing the telescope itself so I could move it closer to balance. I didn't change much but I learned a few things.

I found the 20mm WO eye pieces worked really well for most general viewing. I used a pair of orthoscopics I had that were super light for some planetary viewing and they worked well.

 

Good luck with your endeavors and please let us know how it works out for you. Clear skies.




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