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How to setup basic remote telescope control?

beginner Celestron EAA
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#1 nrcapes

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 02:05 PM

Hi folks, an EAA newbie looking for some help. I have a new Celestron 6SE on my deck. With cold weather coming on, I would like to be able to control the ‘scope from just inside the sliding door. I assume I will need to get the Celestron SkyPortal WiFi controller and some sort of micro focuser. I just added a WiFi extender so I should have plenty of bandwidth on 5g.

 

Alternatively, I could use Stellarium with my MacBook Air (already tested that hard wired to the HC) with a long USB cable for the ‘scope control and use WiFi for the focuser. But that would mean having to leave a gap in the door for the cable.

 

Then of course I would need to get a camera. For moon photography I have already used a Canon Rebel T3 at the Cassegrain focus but would need to get some sort of video camera to do stacking.

 

Can someone give me some advice on the best way to proceed, expected problems, etc.?

 

Thanks!


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#2 jmorales21

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 02:31 PM

I connect my 8" LX200GPS and my ASI224MC camera to a laptop via USB ports. I control the telescope using Cartes du Ciel, the camera using CCDCiel or SharpCap, depending on my targets for the night. On summer nights, I sit next to the whole setup and image from the balcony of my condo in downtown Chicago.

In winter nights, I setup exactly the same way but control the laptop via Remote Desktop from inside my condo. All you need is WiFi.



#3 bobzeq25

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 03:24 PM

I use my home wifi network, a scopeside computer, and Teamviewer.  I get everything running on the scopeside computer.  Come indoors, fire up Teamviewer.  My desktop now looks exactly like the scopeside computer.  The screen is the same, the mouse and keyboard work as if they were connected to the scopeside computer.  No wires between the interior and exterior computers.


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#4 roelb

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 04:24 PM

Here is my solution for a "cordwrap free" setup also used for a 6SE: https://www.cloudyni...ifi-connection/

A ASI290MM camera with free SharpCap software is a good allrounder for a 6SE (no interference with mount base).

Feel free to ask more details.

Good luck with your plunge into the fascinating "EAA world".


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#5 Pess

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 05:03 PM

Hi folks, an EAA newbie looking for some help. I have a new Celestron 6SE on my deck. With cold weather coming on, I would like to be able to control the ‘scope from just inside the sliding door. I assume I will need to get the Celestron SkyPortal WiFi controller and some sort of micro focuser. I just added a WiFi extender so I should have plenty of bandwidth on 5g.

 

Alternatively, I could use Stellarium with my MacBook Air (already tested that hard wired to the HC) with a long USB cable for the ‘scope control and use WiFi for the focuser. But that would mean having to leave a gap in the door for the cable.

 

Then of course I would need to get a camera. For moon photography I have already used a Canon Rebel T3 at the Cassegrain focus but would need to get some sort of video camera to do stacking.

 

Can someone give me some advice on the best way to proceed, expected problems, etc.?

 

Thanks!

I just went through this entire thing.   In fact, out in the garage today I verified that my final configuration works with all the equipment.

 

You have 3 choices:

 

1. Wired; You can run a cable out to a Network hub at the scope.   In my case I had a long amplified USB cable running to a powered hub.  Make sure your powered hub can handle the power needed to the cameras (I had a main and a guide).

 

2. 'Gadget'    Choices are StellarMate & Asiair. Both are small Pi computers that run a basic Linux allowing control at the scope.  Your Window's or Linux  computer connects by WiFi to whichever gadget you use and uses the INDI protocols to run things.  Draw back to using these Gadgets is low bandwidth from the USB 2.0 to your computer.  No problem with DSO's but planetary imaging might get iffy.   I also had trouble finding a INDI driver for my focuser so if you go that route make sure they offer INDI drivers for all your equipment you wish to control.   The upside is that these Gadgets are cheap.  Around $150 each and you are good to go.

 

3. Intel NUC:  This is the best IMHO.  But pricey. You buy a small box Intel computer (called NUC) This is a full fledged Intel computer in a small box.   You load up all your imaging software, drivers, etc onto the NUC drive.  Then the NUC is mounted on or near the telescope.  You then connect using Windows Desktop Remote program and control it through your home internet WiFi.

 

The upside of using the NUC is that everything data intensive is happening at the NUC right at the scope.  All you are doing in your remote computer is sitting back, getting things setup and drinking an alcoholic beverage of your choice.

 

The downside of using a NUC is cost.  A high end NUC can cost $800.   You also will need a wireless keyboard/small monitor for those times you need to directly program windows settings or for some reason the NUC refuses to talk to you over Windows Remote.

 

I also had a heck of a time getting everything to work.  I had to download an ISO image file of the entire WIN 10 installation just to get some Windows administration files loaded (necessary for ASCOM).  

 

But if you enjoy pain, going with an Intel NUC just might be your thing.

 

Pesse (Good luck!) Mist


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#6 bobzeq25

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Posted 29 September 2018 - 05:20 PM

I just went through this entire thing.   In fact, out in the garage today I verified that my final configuration works with all the equipment.

 

You have 3 choices:

 

1. Wired; You can run a cable out to a Network hub at the scope.   In my case I had a long amplified USB cable running to a powered hub.  Make sure your powered hub can handle the power needed to the cameras (I had a main and a guide).

 

2. 'Gadget'    Choices are StellarMate & Asiair. Both are small Pi computers that run a basic Linux allowing control at the scope.  Your Window's or Linux  computer connects by WiFi to whichever gadget you use and uses the INDI protocols to run things.  Draw back to using these Gadgets is low bandwidth from the USB 2.0 to your computer.  No problem with DSO's but planetary imaging might get iffy.   I also had trouble finding a INDI driver for my focuser so if you go that route make sure they offer INDI drivers for all your equipment you wish to control.   The upside is that these Gadgets are cheap.  Around $150 each and you are good to go.

 

3. Intel NUC:  This is the best IMHO.  But pricey. You buy a small box Intel computer (called NUC) This is a full fledged Intel computer in a small box.   You load up all your imaging software, drivers, etc onto the NUC drive.  Then the NUC is mounted on or near the telescope.  You then connect using Windows Desktop Remote program and control it through your home internet WiFi.

 

The upside of using the NUC is that everything data intensive is happening at the NUC right at the scope.  All you are doing in your remote computer is sitting back, getting things setup and drinking an alcoholic beverage of your choice.

 

The downside of using a NUC is cost.  A high end NUC can cost $800.   You also will need a wireless keyboard/small monitor for those times you need to directly program windows settings or for some reason the NUC refuses to talk to you over Windows Remote.

 

I also had a heck of a time getting everything to work.  I had to download an ISO image file of the entire WIN 10 installation just to get some Windows administration files loaded (necessary for ASCOM).  

 

But if you enjoy pain, going with an Intel NUC just might be your thing.

 

Pesse (Good luck!) Mist

My experience was different.

 

I use a NUC as the scopeside computer.  Mine cost $500, and was very much overkill.  $233 would do.  This includes Win10 at that price. 

 

https://www.amazon.c...R/dp/B0150OL7D4

 

I was flabbergasted at how easy everything was to get going.  I had been using a laptop at the computer, basically I just loaded the same programs on the NUC.  My NUC came with Windows 10 preinstalled.  I connected to the Net, let it update.  ASCOM loaded without incident.

 

For talking to the NUC at the scope (as opposed to using Teamviewer indoors on my desktop), I just use a laptop and Teamviewer.  For example to run my Polemaster, where I need to adjust the mount and work the keyboard while watching a screen.

 

My overriding reaction was "why did I wait so long to do this?".


Edited by bobzeq25, 29 September 2018 - 05:23 PM.

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#7 Rickster

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 01:16 AM

Question for those of you using a remote desktop app to access a computer at the telescope. Is the computer at the telescope the workhorse? That is, does it perform the real time processing; such as, store the real time images, do the image stacking, perform image histogram adjustment and autoguider processing (if you autoguide)? If so, when and which images do you download to your indoor computer?

#8 S1mas

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 07:17 AM

Question for those of you using a remote desktop app to access a computer at the telescope. Is the computer at the telescope the workhorse? That is, does it perform the real time processing; such as, store the real time images, do the image stacking, perform image histogram adjustment and autoguider processing (if you autoguide)? If so, when and which images do you download to your indoor computer?

Windows using OneDrive, and sync files between same account, different devices, automatically. So no worries at all.

As a scope side PC I'm using cheap, 90 Eu BeeLink (with Windows 10 home pre installed) from E bay. Works okay.


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#9 nic35

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 08:15 AM

I run everything on the scope side computer. I use an intel stick core m3 running windows 10 pro - my first intel stick was atom based. Not enough HP to deal with the ASI294.

At the end of the session I either dump the images onto the micro SD card and sneaker net that inside, or dump them wirelessly to my inside PC. I run on a stand-alone 5 ghz wireless network using a cheap dual band router. That way it can go into the field with me

J
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#10 nic35

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 08:17 AM

Oh yeah, I’m running Sharpcap, cartes  du Ciel, PHD2 my focuses and Skytools on the compute stick.


Edited by nic35, 30 September 2018 - 08:20 AM.

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#11 ChrisFC

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 09:02 AM

For a year or so I have used a pcstick running sharpcap etc. Ran it remotely with a small 12v powered wifi extender (out at the scope)  through rdp or  teamviewer on a PC inside. Can use this also at a dark site as has its own wifi.


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#12 Noah4x4

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 09:07 AM

+1 for Intel NUC, I have a mid-range with i5 processor.  I agree i7 is expensive overkill, but an i3 is possibly the lower ideal limit. Much depends on camera, but with the price of megapixel cameras falling, you might want a little 'oomph' in reserve to process their huge amounts of high resolution data (see later). 

 

But do note power requirements. Mine runs best at 19v and it requires a peak of around 40+ Watts. If running at merely 12V you hence need more Amp Hours than a typical battery pack will provide (or the battery will run out fast).  Hence, I used a MaxOak K2 at 20v for that and a seperate 12v Tracer for camera and focusser. 

 

However, having got everything running wholly wirelessly with Intel NUC at the scope over Windows Remote Desktop I then realised that my laptop (indoors) was inferior to the NUC (outdoors)  - plus I had a few nuisance performance issues (lag, stutter etc). Yes, it works (but can be flakey), however, TeamViewer or Windows Remote Desktop won't convey my Atik Horizons (exceeding) 4K 'UHD' output and then magically display it in that native resolution on a limited 1080p 'HD' laptop screen! Obvious really, but I didn't initially make the connection. 

 

After much experimentation with various wireless and wired combinations, I now use Celestron direct WiFi to control the scope and my MKIT20-WL focusser's direct WiFi. By using different devices/connectivity (e.g. not over my network) I have eliminated the performance issues. 

 

I now have a single USB3.0 'active' cable from camera to Intel NUC that is now located indoors. The NUC is then connected to a 4K UHD external monitor using its 'Thunderbolt' display port. The EAA image quality is (inevitably) superior to that appearing on my inferior 1080p "HD" monitor. The incremental gain has a price that many won't pay, but there are unexpected benefits.

 

Another issue was I use Hyperstar. That's fast (1.9/f); offers a huge FOV, but that costs magnification (as you remove your secondary mirror). Whilst short exposures to produce similar results means that you then don't need polar alignment or autoguiding, you do need camera <zoom>. It's inevitably much better to use <zoom> with a high resolution camera outputting to a high resolution graphics card and then to the highest resolution monitor available within your budget. Wireless or USB2.0 can be far more limiting than USB3.0. Also, running USB2.0 devices alongside USB3.0 devices (in my experience) won't always play nicely hence the performance challenges. 

 

In summary, don't become obsessed (as I did) with having everything running on a Windows 10 laptop with limited 1080p screen. The NUC's graphics capability is far greater than most laptops and how long before you upgrade your TV to 4K UHD given 'UHD' prices will tumble with the next generation beyond 16 megapixel becoming available?  Aim to match camera with computer with display device. Your display device might be your most limiting factor!  Bet that's the last thing you consider until reading this post.


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#13 bobzeq25

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 10:15 AM

Question for those of you using a remote desktop app to access a computer at the telescope. Is the computer at the telescope the workhorse? That is, does it perform the real time processing; such as, store the real time images, do the image stacking, perform image histogram adjustment and autoguider processing (if you autoguide)? If so, when and which images do you download to your indoor computer?

I use the scopeside NUC (it's an i3) for all acquisition.  This includes platesolving and looking at subframes with PixInsight, to see how things are going.  I later use Teamviewer to download the data to my desktop for the serious processing.  It's a 6 core i7 with 32GB of memory, and much storage.


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#14 jmorales21

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Posted 30 September 2018 - 09:56 PM

Question for those of you using a remote desktop app to access a computer at the telescope. Is the computer at the telescope the workhorse? That is, does it perform the real time processing; such as, store the real time images, do the image stacking, perform image histogram adjustment and autoguider processing (if you autoguide)? If so, when and which images do you download to your indoor computer?

I leave my "workhorse" laptop at the telescope (although it's just a Thinkpad T420, i5) and remotely control it from inside using an Intel Compute Stick CS125. The remote desktop computer is just monitor and keyboard for the one controlling the scope.


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#15 roelb

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Posted 01 October 2018 - 05:23 PM

Question for those of you using a remote desktop app to access a computer at the telescope. Is the computer at the telescope the workhorse? That is, does it perform the real time processing; such as, store the real time images, do the image stacking, perform image histogram adjustment and autoguider processing (if you autoguide)? If so, when and which images do you download to your indoor computer?

Hello Rick.

All my software needed to image, control scope etc.. is functioning on the little computer at the scope.

I store the images onto a SDXCI 128 GB which I plug into my laptop after the imaging session.

The inside laptop is only used as a display for the mini PC at the scope.

PS: I have experienced that using Windows remote desktop is more stable then 'Teamviewer'.


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#16 Noah4x4

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Posted 01 October 2018 - 06:54 PM

+1 for Windows Remote Desktop being more stable that TeamViewer. Also the 'free' version  of TeamViewer has to run over the Internet which I found is much slower and more laggy than Windows Remote Desktop via direct 802.11ac wireless.

 

But it is interesting to read that Roel does all of his processing on the 'workhorse' computer at the scope and stores images on a SDXCI 128GB and hence uses the remote laptop only as a display/control. That route is great for regular Astrophotography where image processing can be completed later on the highest specification computer and display device you own or for replaying captured video or stacks. 

 

What I discovered for 'near live' EAA is there is a significant difference between viewing Hyperstar/16 megapixel camera produced stacked images on (say) an Intel NUC with 'Iris Plus 640' graphics output by 'Thunderbolt' display cable to a 4K UHD monitor compared to that seen on a standard 1080p 'HD' laptop transferred from the NUC over 'wireless'. That is not surprising when you compare the pixel count capability of the lesser 1080p display device with the NUC and its superior graphics engine.  I also suspect that wireless data transfer further degrades image quality.

 

In particular, I found that camera <zoom> benefits from the full 4K UHD experience as blocky pixelation then occurs at higher <zoom> levels. That is potentially important when using Hyperstar to view smaller DSOs as removing your secondary mirror/fastar increases FOV with an inevitable loss of magnification. But it might not be as noticeable (or cost justified) where the camera is attached at the rear of your OTA in regular replacement of your eyepiece; hence where FOV is smaller and magnification unaffected.  I like Hyperstar as it means no polar alignment and no autoguiding is necessary as reducing my scope from f/10 to f/1.9 means shorter exposures to capture the equivalent images to longer exposures. However, for EAA on Hyperstar, you may wish to benefit from the deeper level of <zoom> possible with a minimum of 3840 x 2160 pixel resolution camera + 4k UHD computer + 4K UHD display device in the image chain. 

 

I have hence recently abandoned wireless connectivity for my camera and switched back to long 'active' USB3 cable to the NUC + Thunderbolt to 4K UHD monitor in my warm mission control. My NUC is now also indoors reducing weight at my scope (do note that not all NUCs offer Iris Plus 640 graphics). I now use Celestron Wireless and MKIT20-WL wireless for control of scope and Microfocuser which has eliminated the performance problems I was suffering due to conflicts between USB3 and USB2 devices.

 

I personally now believe that any form of wireless data transfer probably degrades image quality as regards EAA. Then, with so many cameras exceeding 16 megapixels and the price of '4K' UHD monitors falling fast now that Sony and Samsung have announced an '8K' monitor and TV specification I suspect a flight back to USB3 and cabled is potentially likely. That is until wireless specifications and laptops generally embrace the higher 4K UHD, which ironically may be almost redundant before a majority of computer/TV owners have upgraded.  So if buying a mid-range or higher Intel NUC to pair with your already high resolution camera, be aware of its superior graphics capability compared to most laptops.  It (arguably) doesn't makes sense to view it's EAA output on a cheaper laptop with less than half of its resolution potential, albeit that will still remain veryngood.  If affordable, I suggest you match both camera and computer and display capabilities. In summary, choice of computer/display for EAA isn't just about processor speed if you own (say) a 16 megapixel camera.  I now own two as even my older Nikon D5200 DSLR offers 24 megapixel and my much easier to use Atik Horizon offers 16 megapixel. 


Edited by Noah4x4, 01 October 2018 - 07:08 PM.

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#17 alphatripleplus

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Posted 01 October 2018 - 08:06 PM

I use my home wifi network, a scopeside computer, and Teamviewer.  I get everything running on the scopeside computer.  Come indoors, fire up Teamviewer.  My desktop now looks exactly like the scopeside computer.  The screen is the same, the mouse and keyboard work as if they were connected to the scopeside computer.  No wires between the interior and exterior computers.

+1 for this approach

 

I have been using Teamviewer quite happily in this fashion ever since I started EAA; I have a wife extender to boost the signal into the yard. I've found it very straightforward - in my case the laptop near the scope does the heavy lifting, runs all the astro related software, and the PC inside the house is essentially a dumb terminal for viewing the laptop at the scope over Teamviewer. As all image data and software reside on the scope laptop, there is no transfer of large data files over wifi.


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#18 Noah4x4

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 02:16 AM

+1 for this approach

 

I have been using Teamviewer quite happily in this fashion ever since I started EAA; I have a wife extender to boost the signal into the yard. I've found it very straightforward - in my case the laptop near the scope does the heavy lifting, runs all the astro related software, and the PC inside the house is essentially a dumb terminal for viewing the laptop at the scope over Teamviewer. As all image data and software reside on the scope laptop, there is no transfer of large data files over wifi.

"There is NO transfer of large data files over WiFi" is exactly my point.

 

Many people now have a high resolution, large sensor camera connected to an Intel NUC with 'Iris Plus Graphics 640' at the scope that is similarly capable of outputting 4K 'UHD' if directly connected to a 4K UHD monitor by 'Thunderbolt' display port or HDMI. The EAA image you are then watching is inevitable superior than that output over wireless to a mere 1080p 'HD' laptop screen. Even if both laptops are limited to the same 1080p standard I believe the video compression used by (say) TeamViewer degrades the image you are watching remotely (as the data files transferred to the display device are much smaller).

 

Your options then to enhance image quality is a long HDMI cable from NUC (at scope)  to 4k UHD monitor (indoors) whilst using a remote wireless keyboard and mouse or move the NUC indoors and instead connect camera to NUC by long 'Active' USB3 (and use alternative wireless options for scope control). 'Thunderbolt' is faster and far more reliable over a 10M + distance, but both cabled routes can offer a superior 'end to end' 4K UHD EAA experience compared to any wireless options. Wireless connectivity must come at a cost to image quality unless all your components have lower capabilities (like Raspberry Pi or lesser Compute Sticks). 

 

To be fair, you probably won't notice as much difference where your camera is attached at rhe rear of your OTA as 1080p 'HD' is pretty good and the cost of the upgrade is harder to justify.  But if your high resolution large sensor camera is mounted on Hyperstar with its enormously rich FOV (but lesser magnification) you will enjoy the enhanced <zoom> that the higher resolution of a 4K cabled UHD display device  permits. Once I had invested £500 in the superior NUC it was only  modest financial step to upgrade my monitor and with 8k monitors soon to hit the market from Samsung, 4K will soon become commonplace and prices tumble. We have all invested crazy amounts of money in this hobby. My point is that if investing in a high resolution, large sensor camera, it is wise to consider both computer and display device you are going to pair it with and the connectivity options. Even if limited to a 1080p display due to budget, my experience is USB cable is superior to wireless options as regards the ultimate EAA image quality displayed on screen. Watching soccer on a '4K UHD' TV compared to 'HD' is similar. 


Edited by Noah4x4, 02 October 2018 - 02:41 AM.


#19 alphatripleplus

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 07:24 AM

"There is NO transfer of large data files over WiFi" is exactly my point.

 

 

Yes, absolutely. Whatever approach the OP chooses to use, this is an important consideration.



#20 roelb

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 12:48 PM

Looking forward to see some feedback from the OP.

#21 nrcapes

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 10:54 PM

Looking forward to see some feedback from the OP.

Ok. A lot of great comments and I am the OP. I just upgraded my MacBook Air to a 500GB SSD, Bootcamp, and Windows 10. Now I need to figure out how to use some of the software that was discussed to do image stacking. For now, I would be happy to run everything live at the scope and worry about remote visual astronomy later. I am still a complete newbie to EAA. I am trying to find a simple write-up on things like “light frames”, “dark frames” etc. for using Sharpcap.

 

But all that is for the future. I’m still learning visual observing with my new Celestron 6SE and some moon photography with the tele extender.

 

thanks all!


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#22 nic35

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Posted 04 October 2018 - 07:45 AM

If you haven't figured it out, most of us are gadget addicts, willing to spend time and $$ playing around with things

But this area of EAA is changing rapidly. The new ASIAIR seems like a complete wireless solution at a very affordable price. You are locked into one manufacturers cameras, but ZWO is not a bad partner to be stuck with

Plus their imaging software has been steadily improving, from what I can tell.

Might be worth looking at. High point has a decent review on their website

J

Edited by nic35, 04 October 2018 - 07:52 AM.


#23 gun4hire

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Posted 17 October 2018 - 09:33 PM

I use teamviewer, but notice some lagging and "blurriness" at times. I can't use windows remote since both my computers are just the home edition and it is not included from what I can see.

 

I have only 2 usb connections going to my " powerhouse" laptop next to the scope. A USB3 from my 224 camera and the scope's hand controller adapts down to a USB2 (Stellarium). Both plug into my laptop and I can see it and control remotely with teamveiwer, or sit there and use it live.

 

This winter I have a spare bedroom in the corner of the house near where I set up the scope. I would like to have the scope 50 to 75 feet out into the yard. Is there a USB booster/extender I can plug both into and have one USB cable run to the house/into a window and connect to one port on my computer (same laptop I used at the scope) and run the camera and scope (via Stellarium) in the warmth of my house???

 

I thought there was something out there that would work. I will have 110v power at the scope. The question is not to hijack thread, but add an option to the OP

 

edit...just read a ton of post on my subject and have a headache..looks like I should just get used to TeamViewer and forget about pushing USB3 any distance....or get a wifi producing "stick" at the scope.


Edited by gun4hire, 17 October 2018 - 10:52 PM.


#24 Larry Adams

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Posted 18 October 2018 - 09:57 AM

I use an AV Acess extender to operate an Intel i5 Nuc at the scope to control 2 cameras, focuser, filter wheel, and mount. The nuc has 4K graphics, ethernet, and 4 USB 3 ports, 2 to connect to the extender for mouse and keyboard, a 3rd to connect to a startech 4-port usb 3.0 hub. The extender connects my indoor 4K monitor, USB 2.0 keyboard and mouse to the nuc with virtually no latency. I use a 150 ft cat 6 cable, but is advertised to work to 100 meters. It just works, no need for WiFi or Internet!

 

The extender is:

 

AV Access HDMI USB KVM Extender(HDBaseT),100m(330ft) 4K 60Hz Over Cat5e/6a,Keyboard+Mouse+HDMI+USB,4 Ports USB2.0, No Signal Loss and Latency, RS232, POE, Independent EDID Management


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#25 Noah4x4

Noah4x4

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Posted 18 October 2018 - 11:16 AM

I use an AV Acess extender to operate an Intel i5 Nuc at the scope to control 2 cameras, focuser, filter wheel, and mount. The nuc has 4K graphics, ethernet, and 4 USB 3 ports, 2 to connect to the extender for mouse and keyboard, a 3rd to connect to a startech 4-port usb 3.0 hub. The extender connects my indoor 4K monitor, USB 2.0 keyboard and mouse to the nuc with virtually no latency. I use a 150 ft cat 6 cable, but is advertised to work to 100 meters. It just works, no need for WiFi or Internet!

 

The extender is:

 

AV Access HDMI USB KVM Extender(HDBaseT),100m(330ft) 4K 60Hz Over Cat5e/6a,Keyboard+Mouse+HDMI+USB,4 Ports USB2.0, No Signal Loss and Latency, RS232, POE, Independent EDID Management

Interesting variance on my set up. I too have only a single long cable from camera to NUC (indoors) except I use an 'active' USB3. I then connect NUC to 4k UHD monitor by Display port (Thunderbolt).  Scope control is by Celestron WiFi and my focuser uses its own direct connect WiFi. Keyboard and mouse are connected wirelessly. 

 

I did try USB2 to permit scope to be controlled (via Nexremote) and focusser to run over the same cable as the camera but it was tempramental. Never thought about leaving the NUC at scope and using cat 6 cable. Howeveem my route also avoids the erratic performance, stuttering and locks ups I found prevalent when using Teamviewer/Remote desktop. However, I suspect that others with less data intensive cameras don't suffer the same problems. Since reverting to cable, life has been far less challenging. 


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