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The novice embarks on walls!

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#176 Michael Morris

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 05:38 PM

Bummer or what? You are having just the worst luck mate. My heartfelt sympathies go out to you. Is the roof literally missing, destroyed or just damaged?

#177 Michael Rapp

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 08:26 PM

It is destroyed. We had a tornado come through out neighborhood. My shed missing its roof is the least of my problems....I'm missing 1/4 of my fence (missing...not blown down, MISSING)....I have major shingle damage on the roof....

You can see in the image that 1/2 of the roof is inside the shed. The other half? 1/4 of a mile away. I found it.

I just got home and need to go help the neighbors who have more damage than I.

#178 oldsalt

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 08:38 PM

Sorry to hear Michael. Once you get things cleaned up, take some time for yourself and veg out. At least no one was hurt. The rest can be fixed.

#179 Galaxyhunter

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 09:39 PM

Michael, NOT GOOD! :( After you get the important stuff fixed(housing, ect.), Take a couple of days off, Smile :), then start at it again.

#180 Michael Rapp

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 09:40 PM

Here's one piece of my roof. Wedged in the fence on the opposite side of the yard! Wouldn't have wanted to be in front of that thing!

Attached Thumbnails

  • 998510-wedge.jpg


#181 oldsalt

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 09:45 PM

Yikes :bigshock: :bigshock:

#182 Michael Rapp

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Posted 13 June 2006 - 10:31 PM

Here's the photos I posted in OTO. :(

#183 NeoDinian

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 02:30 PM

Hey, You may be able to claim it on your Home Owners insurance for the shed... At least it would help offset something.

#184 Michael Rapp

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:57 PM

This may be a very elementary question...but, why couldn't I design a roof based on plywood?

I can see the problem of the wood sagging/warping in the middle, but some bracing could mitigate that. The roof also might have to be replaced every so often.

Thoughts?

#185 Galaxyhunter

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 07:58 AM

Michael,
You could, but weight might be a concern(for removal).
Jeff (Neo) is a carpenter, so he can give you some tips on how to frame,brace, or construct it.

#186 Michael Rapp

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 11:16 AM

Here's basically what I have right now. With the current gables, the side of each roof section is 9'x4'. This allows some overhang on each side. The pitch of the roof is very shallow...the length from the bottom of the gable to the top is only 5".

While at Home Depot, I found their corrugated roof section. I found many plastic and metal panels of varying sizes (but all 2' widths). If I string five of these together to make a roof section, it will bow in the middle easily.

I wonder what type of bracing could prevent this?

#187 Michael Rapp

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 12:13 PM

I am looking at this design with much interest. :question:

#188 Michael Rapp

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 03:06 PM

On more thought...nope...don't really want to go back to the hinged design.

Although, I like the use of the plastic corrogated roof.

Maybe I just incorporate this into a slide-off design. I've just got to find some way to keep the roof from bowing in the middle.

#189 NeoDinian

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 06:33 PM

Carl: Carpenter by name... The field of "Carpentry" I am in is floor covering. Mainly hardwood floors, but I can do sheet goods and Vinyl tile also.

Michael: Doing a simple frame out of 1x3's would be plenty strong for the plastic corrigated roof panels. As long as the slope is enough to now allow water to sit, they should be fine. If you wanted more stability, you can add a piece of angled aluminum extrusion through the center or upper portion for added strength.

#190 oldsalt

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 07:37 PM

I'd go a little heavy on the frame for those corregated plastic panels and use 2x3's . It should be plenty rigid, you've got enough slope for water runoff so that shouldn't be a problem.

#191 Michael Rapp

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Posted 17 June 2006 - 11:10 PM

I have a bunch of left over 2x2s....they worked great on my short-lived roof.

Tomorrow I'm going to try to get the doors up and buy the stuff for the roof. Hopefully I can find enough of the corregated stuff you nail between the purloins and the corregated roof.

I leave for a week-long conference on the 24th...I'm going to try my hardest to get a roof on this silly thing (one that will stay, too!).

#192 Michael Rapp

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 12:22 PM

Yesterday, while at Home Depot buying roof supplied, I went to go pick up a couple tubes of caulk.

So many varieties, acrylic, silicon, latex.....window, door, kitchen, tub...painter's caulk. :confused:

I tried making sense of it all, but I was unable.

What type of caulk should I use to seal the places where various wood panels meet on the exterior of my observatory? :help:

#193 MichaelW

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 12:32 PM

25+ year acryilic/latex exterior caulk is good, but won't generally last 25+ years. At least around here caulking lasts about 5 years on the outside. If it's painted over will help in duration. Apply in liberal amounts and push it deep into cracks for best durability. Thin applications of any caulking doesn't generally last very long.

Roof caulk, the black nasty stuff that requires other than water for clean up will last the longest as well as have the most durability and water resistance. But it is not always paintable and you don't want it where you may come in contact with it later as it usually remains gooey, sticky and messy forever.

Use exterior use caulking only as your application will be in the weather. Water base is ok, but you will have maintenance. Tub and tile, counter top, etc. Isn't what you are looking for.

HTH

#194 Scott Horstman

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Posted 19 June 2006 - 03:51 PM

I use the expensive silicone. It just works best.
The latex stuff is OK but make sure there's no rain in the forcast and even heavy dew can make it run.

#195 Richard B. Drumm

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 10:36 AM

I call that stuff "Tar in a tube" and use it on the house's roof... Ought to work if you can keep it off your clothes...

I'm thinking of building my observatory's walls out of that corrugated roofing stuff that's at Lowe's. Heavy guage and tough as nails. This stuff is opaque, not the translucent fiberglass I've seen on shed roofs, can't recall the name of it just now, started with an "A" if memory serves (which sometimes it doesn't ;-)
Rich

#196 NeoDinian

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 10:50 AM

I myself am thinking of a low pitched roof with sissor trusses spaced at that 17.whatever mark (Diamond mark on most tape measures) and a thinner (3/8" perhaps) plywood (NOT OSB) covered in roof shingles... This should be light enough for my 10x16 roof...

I'm still debating on the roof for the moment though. Don't think I want the corrigated roof, since when it rains, they are loud...

#197 MichaelW

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 11:23 AM

I'm still debating on the roof for the moment though. Don't think I want the corrigated roof, since when it rains, they are loud...

I will be using metal roofing and will first lay down sheets of 1/2" foam that around here goes by the trade name of Celotex. That should dampen the noise considerably, particularly from the inside.

edit: I should add that Celotex or similar foil faced foam board also has some thermal insulation value and the stuff I will use is relflective silver on one side and flat black on the other so it should help reflect the heat out with the silver foil side to the metal roof as well as already be blackout black on the inside.

PS, I would be very interested in seeing your truss design as I would like to compare it to mine as I am also considering a scissor truss style but am looking at design build methods to make the cuts less complex and more repeatable, even if it is only for 11 trusses.

#198 imjeffp

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 12:08 PM

since when it rains, they are loud


How much time do you plan to spend observing in the rain? :confused:

#199 NeoDinian

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Posted 21 June 2006 - 02:40 PM

First, I'm refering to hearing it banging in the rain from inside the house... My last home we had a metal shed next door, and I could hear they plain as day...

Michael: The trusses I'm not planning on making. I'll be buying them premade. They are fairly cheap.


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