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Black Hole Gang Reminiscence

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#26 AstroKerr

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 08:54 PM

The C14 is my favorite for planetary imaging. Hopefully after my kidney transplant I can get back into it.

I hope you do as well. But yes, get thru the kidney transplant and heal first - it's nice to have you around - I learn a lot. Send us an update if you can, after, so we know you're okay - lotta folks care =)

 

Jim


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#27 rolo

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 09:52 PM

What's with the blue hose that looks like it is coupled to the top of that stubby pier somewhere Jeff..?

 

Looks like an air compressor hose to me, but maybe it's just garden hose etc - something to protect the mount's  wiring outside..?

Probably the power cord...


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#28 rolo

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 09:53 PM

I hope you do as well. But yes, get thru the kidney transplant and heal first - it's nice to have you around - I learn a lot. Send us an update if you can, after, so we know you're okay - lotta folks care =)

 

Jim

Thanks...it been so long I'm starting to lose hope that I'll ever get a kidney.


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#29 AstroKerr

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 10:59 PM

This is like the Imagers Hall of Fame - just too cool! 

 

"Heart and Spirit" is fascinating - well, they all are, Kokatha Man. I like those silhouette-ish photos as well - my Aunt used to paint lakesides and wildlife in that style -  believe she was also one of the first artists to put a joint in Santa's hand back in the early 70's

 

The blue hose looks like Carlon blue ENT flexible conduit 

 

Mounts are functional art



#30 AstroKerr

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 11:00 PM

It'll happen, Rol. Don't lose hope - never lose hope, no reason to lose hope, because life's just that way - nothing, nothing, nothing - bam - nothing, nothing... no rhyme or reason to it, but it works pretty good when ya step back and watch. Hope is a freebie thing our minds give us to keep us going - it's survived because it helps us survive (kinda evolutionary) I'm pretty sure if hope didn't work, we wouldn't have it. It gets us thru the 'nothing' days - so keep it close, keep it simmerin'.

 

jim


Edited by AstroKerr, 11 October 2018 - 01:34 AM.

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#31 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 05:41 AM

What's with the blue hose that looks like it is coupled to the top of that stubby pier somewhere Jeff..?

 

Looks like an air compressor hose to me, but maybe it's just garden hose etc - something to protect the mount's  wiring outside..?

Oh Daryl, it is an oxygen hose for my mask when on the ladder lol.gif  

 

Actually, a PVC electrical conduit to an outside receptacle to power up various stuff. It runs to my electrical power box on the house. 


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#32 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 05:51 AM

The C14 is my favorite for planetary imaging. Hopefully after my kidney transplant I can get back into it.

Wow, hope it works out for you.  Recently I had a kidney stone removed and it turned out to be a lucky pain in the back because my urologist found two small tumors in my bladder (in situ neoplasm) and removed them.  Just Tuesday I went back for a Cystoscopy look see and he determined I am now cancer free.  Yeah, sometimes life is a real pain.


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#33 Kokatha man

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 06:57 AM

Oh Daryl, it is an oxygen hose for my mask when on the ladder lol.gif  

 

Actually, a PVC electrical conduit to an outside receptacle to power up various stuff. It runs to my electrical power box on the house. 

lol.gif ...my eyes must've been playing up Jeff, I can see now that it is a flexible conduit type now: maybe imaging Mars last night messed up my seeing temporarily, it was bouncing around like a flamin' pinball early on. Eyecrazy.gif

 

Same tonight, it is settling down but very slowly...but we got some reasonable captures last night anyway we think so we've got plenty on our plate to process atm...fingerscrossed.gif


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#34 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 09:58 AM

Guess Mars is appearing smaller, so to is our OT discussion as well; we're moving on :) 


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#35 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:44 AM

After Capen retired in 1983, or 84, he ordered a set of 20” Cassegrain optics and had it shipped to us (Bill Douglass, Don Parker and me) in Miami to test and build if all went well.  He had already found a nice mount; Tom Cave brought it to him, and was all set to enjoy retirement using his large telescope.  Well, we found that the 20” primary figure was rough, with more than half of the surface appeared like “dog biscuit” figuring and several way out zones.  We assembled a quickie Dobsonian with the primary and found the images were terrible, so magnifying the errors with a Cass secondary would be worse and we reported this to Chick.  Of course, he was disappointed; so we started designing him a 16” f/50 Cassegrain from my rough cut 16” mirror that I had not been finished for my use. 

 

After Chick died, in 1986, the mirror was eventually ground round and flat, then figured for my 16” f/6.9 Newtonian by Dan Joyce and it is still with me.  On second thought, back in 2001, I began to wish it had been the same f/50 Cass that we would have made for Capen if he had lived.  Sitting down under the scope would have been better on this old body than climbing the 8-foot ladder, and I love Classical Cassegrain telescopes anyway.  Maybe I would have not missed observing the current apparition, even with a fancy digital camera.  Dan would have figured some sweet optics for me I'm sure.

 

The optics, and eventually my mechanical build, made this Newtonian the very best telescope I have ever used.  I loved Parker’s 16” f/6, but even he was astounded by my images.  Old Danny-Boy out did himself with my mirror.  In 1994 while observing the comet crash into Jupiter; “eagle eye” Steve O’Meara was at my house and I set it up to observe Ganymede later that night.  Not paying attention to my eyepiece box I grabbed a 10mm Clave and stuck it in the Barlow and we observed the tiny Moon of Jupiter at 1,124X.  We had a ball drawing a chart of Ganymede and then discovered the magnification, and also that seeing was perfect.  I think others follows us up the ladder and gasped at view as well.  So, it is a keeper.


Edited by Jeff B1, 11 October 2018 - 10:54 AM.

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#36 Dartguy

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 11:37 AM

The first pic made me think you guys had finished Tesla's death ray.  


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#37 AstroKerr

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 12:02 PM

My obsolete and stored away astronomy toys:  http://www.alpo-astr...Observatory.pdf

 

Just too old to use them now.  Still have my 12.5" now for 40 + years.

That's going on my phone - I glanced thru real quick - MORE great info. Why, I'll be up to speed in no time! 

You are not too old, I doubt you ever will be - you don't need to whip a half dozen scopes around at a time - just one done well.

 

RosCosmos near miss, but they got'em back safe - you ever think we'd be hand-in-hand with them fellas? I was a cold war kid - never thought things'd change so much...

 

Hope we get Hubble fixed, otherwise you're back up the ladder with the Clave, buck-o...


Edited by AstroKerr, 11 October 2018 - 12:29 PM.


#38 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 12:44 PM

The first pic made me think you guys had finished Tesla's death ray.  

Ha!  Was just discussing how Edison fired Tesla, can't remember why except jealousy, and Nikola when to Westinghouse who made gazillions off A/C generated power generation and all that came with it.  We had seen on TV the so-called electric power poles in PR and it remained me of when Edison attempted to wire New York up with DC power.  Looked like a Rub Goldberg project on steroids.  Anyway,  Tesla was a frequent study while finishing up my BSEE, back 50 years  ago, and his ideas were solid.  Of course, some of his ideas grew into something bigger smile.gif   


Edited by Jeff B1, 11 October 2018 - 12:46 PM.

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#39 rcwolpert

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 02:01 PM

Loved the pictures and all the write-up. Brings back memories of the days when amateurs made really hefty mounts to go with their 12.5" and 16" mirrors (I'm 69).  I had a 12.5" on a 800lb mount with a counterweight made of cast lead, large pillow blocks for both RA and Dec axies, 2.5" shafts, and a nice Mathis 11" gear for RA drive, and all of that in a roll-off roof observatory built into my back deck. Those were great days. Thanks for bringing back the memories!

 

Bob



#40 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 02:08 PM

Loved the pictures and all the write-up. Brings back memories of the days when amateurs made really hefty mounts to go with their 12.5" and 16" mirrors (I'm 69).  I had a 12.5" on a 800lb mount with a counterweight made of cast lead, large pillow blocks for both RA and Dec axies, 2.5" shafts, and a nice Mathis 11" gear for RA drive, and all of that in a roll-off roof observatory built into my back deck. Those were great days. Thanks for bringing back the memories!

 

Bob

Sometimes I wish my scopes were lighter, but physics had its way smile.gif  I still haven't removed the mount, too heavy for this old dude to lift and cart away.  No one to help; my neighbor has only one arm and one leg and I haven't met my other neighbors in 17 years living here lol.gif   Actually, we don't have many.  Maybe I'll make a wooden hoist to put it in my small trailer then move it on my back patio.  Oh well...…

 

Yeah, memories are long, action short these days.


Edited by Jeff B1, 11 October 2018 - 03:52 PM.

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#41 Dartguy

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 02:24 PM

Ha!  Was just discussing how Edison fired Tesla, can't remember why except jealousy, and Nikola when to Westinghouse who made gazillions off A/C generated power generation and all that came with it.  We had seen on TV the so-called electric power poles in PR and it remained me of when Edison attempted to wire New York up with DC power.  Looked like a Rub Goldberg project on steroids.  Anyway,  Tesla was a frequent study while finishing up my BSEE, back 50 years  ago, and his ideas were solid.  Of course, some of his ideas grew into something bigger smile.gif   

Just as I suspected!

 

Please don't point that thing towards Louisville!



#42 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:02 PM

rcwolpert, much of the fun back then in ATM'ing was visiting junk yards near the airport to find titanium or aluminum structures and rings tailor made for telescope building.  Many of our telescopes had jet engine turbine rings perfect round and with convenient holes for attaching telescope stuff.  It was just fun to be out with friends looking for junk.  Sometimes we forget the comradery and friendship in such groups.


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#43 CHASLX200

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:23 PM

Sometimes I wish my scopes were lighter, but physics had its way smile.gif  I still haven't removed the mount, too heavy for this old dude to lift and cart away.  No one to help; my neighbor has only one arm and one leg and I haven't met my other neighbors in 17 years living here lol.gif   Actually, we don't have many.  Maybe I'll make a wooden hoist to put it in my small trailer then move it on my back patio.  Oh well...…

 

Yeah, memories are long, action short these days.

I would help take it away. I would die for a 16" F/6 or slower Newt in my seeing.



#44 rolo

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 07:44 PM

bombdrop.gif


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#45 rcwolpert

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 01:49 PM

rcwolpert, much of the fun back then in ATM'ing was visiting junk yards near the airport to find titanium or aluminum structures and rings tailor made for telescope building.  Many of our telescopes had jet engine turbine rings perfect round and with convenient holes for attaching telescope stuff.  It was just fun to be out with friends looking for junk.  Sometimes we forget the comradery and friendship in such groups.

You are so right, Jeff. Every piece of metal and anything that was at all dome-shaped was thought of in terms of "how can I use this for my telescope?" Now it takes all my effort just to get a small telescope to some location where I have the least amount of light interference. I miss the old days. Once in a while I take out my observing notebooks that go back to 1964, just to remember those fun times.

 

Bob



#46 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 01:58 PM

rcwolpert, I used to dwell in the past until I realized my age and now I dwell on the future cool.gif  I too miss those days; now all my old buddies are gone. 

 

Wow, while I was not involved in amateur astronomy much in my early years I did find the local observers on Naha Air Base, Okinawa in 1960-62.5 when they would gather with telescopes on the old cannon mound near my barracks.  The sky was velvet black, filled with stars even on a fully operating Air Force base.  Times has changed.  


Edited by Jeff B1, 12 October 2018 - 01:59 PM.

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#47 clamchip

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 08:16 PM

You've brought tears to my eyes, Boeing Surplus, yes Boeing Surplus, it's gone now.

All kinds of exotic metals and cutting tools sharpened to the limit but plenty of life left for the

home workshop.

The aerospace industry is where the good stuff is, even the fasteners are work's of art.

 

Robert


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#48 rcwolpert

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 09:24 PM

rcwolpert, I used to dwell in the past until I realized my age and now I dwell on the future cool.gif  I too miss those days; now all my old buddies are gone. 

 

Wow, while I was not involved in amateur astronomy much in my early years I did find the local observers on Naha Air Base, Okinawa in 1960-62.5 when they would gather with telescopes on the old cannon mound near my barracks.  The sky was velvet black, filled with stars even on a fully operating Air Force base.  Times has changed.  

 

 

Jeff, we’re not that far from each other. Perhaps at some point we can get together and have some fun reminiscing old times in amateur astronomy.


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#49 rcwolpert

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 09:28 PM

You've brought tears to my eyes, Boeing Surplus, yes Boeing Surplus, it's gone now.

All kinds of exotic metals and cutting tools sharpened to the limit but plenty of life left for the

home workshop.

The aerospace industry is where the good stuff is, even the fasteners are work's of art.

 

Robert

 

Boeing surplus would be an amateur astronomer’s paradise!


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#50 Jeff B1  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 07:48 AM

One reason I stopped climbing the ladder; 2009 was a great year for walking, but not for climbing laugh.gif  A before and after fat legs with new knees smile.gif

 

Befreo_After.jpg


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