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Detect exoplanets by yourself with the cheapest equipment

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30 replies to this topic

#26 akulapanam

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Posted 04 November 2018 - 03:30 PM

MPO Canopus does asteroid and exoplanet light curves but I would say the learning curve is steeper for the former. AstroimageJ doesn't seem to handle a moving target as well however.

It looks like Prism or MaximDL is also an option.


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#27 pixlimit

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 11:57 AM

cool job

 

What are the next steps, if you think you have discovered one?

 

clear skies

Peter


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#28 GalaxyPiper

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Posted 07 October 2019 - 10:17 PM

Well done! Bravo! I'll be looking into this in the coming year!

Thank you!

 

Clear Skies, and open eyes belushi.gif

Bryan


Edited by GalaxyPiper, 07 October 2019 - 10:19 PM.


#29 schmeah

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 08:20 AM

This is great stuff. I’ve seen various estimates, but if we assume that the majority of stars have at least one exoplanet, why would it be difficult for any one of us, using our own equipment and the methods excellently outlined here, to eventually “discover” one by sequentially trialing random stars? What would make a random star a greater candidate for detection?

 

Derek



#30 caballerodiez91

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 03:12 PM

cool job

 

What are the next steps, if you think you have discovered one?

 

clear skies

Peter

Thanks!

 

The next step would be to ask other observatories to confirm your candidate. 



#31 caballerodiez91

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Posted 12 October 2019 - 03:15 PM

This is great stuff. I’ve seen various estimates, but if we assume that the majority of stars have at least one exoplanet, why would it be difficult for any one of us, using our own equipment and the methods excellently outlined here, to eventually “discover” one by sequentially trialing random stars? What would make a random star a greater candidate for detection?

 

Derek

Thanks!

Yes, it's difficult to find one unless you are monitoring the whole sky (like in the MEarth project).

However, the chances increase by monitoring one star at a time during several months. I'm coordinating 30 observatories that actually do this.


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