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What Classic did you use to see Shoemaker-Levy 9

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#51 rolo

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:32 AM

Wow fantastic post Jeff. I remember seeing Don’s Jupiter images at a Camera store in south Florida. I don’t remember the name of the store but I think the counter guy was Tom. I think Don used a Sky Lynx camera if I’m not mistaken. Great memories...


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#52 Jeff B1

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 10:06 AM

Wow fantastic post Jeff. I remember seeing Don’s Jupiter images at a Camera store in south Florida. I don’t remember the name of the store but I think the counter guy was Tom. I think Don used a Sky Lynx camera if I’m not mistaken. Great memories...

Can't remember the guy's name either; was a friend for years.  Yes, back then Don used a LYNXX PC CCD camera.  Here is one from days gone by:  Don at his 12.5" and Nikon camera:

 

image1.JPG


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#53 rolo

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 12:50 PM

He was one of if not the nicest person in the hobby. Last time I visited him we were wondering how to get rid of the neighbor's palm tree. It would obstruct his view of the planets and prevent imaging. The top of the palm was close to balcony where the 16" was so I suggested we set the palm on fire and tell the neighbor it got struck by lightning.lol.gif


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#54 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 02:48 PM

Jeff

 

thanks for sharing the outstanding pdf  report and sketches....this has to be saved somewhere...

 

for some us.....mere amateur amateurs...it was great just to see this event  much less  film it / sketch it  and preserve it. As it says in someone's tag line....Amateurs do make significant contributions  or something like that...

 

I do like how many of us seem to have shared this event with our daughters


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#55 ShaulaB

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 02:52 PM

Shoemaker-Levy 9 scars on Jupiter were observed in a 10" f5 home built Dob and an Astroscan. Ahhh, those were the days!
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#56 Jeff B1

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 03:27 PM

Jeff

 

thanks for sharing the outstanding pdf  report and sketches....this has to be saved somewhere...

 

for some us.....mere amateur amateurs...it was great just to see this event  much less  film it / sketch it  and preserve it. As it says in someone's tag line....Amateurs do make significant contributions  or something like that...

 

I do like how many of us seem to have shared this event with our daughters

lol.gif   Hey, most of us are mere amateurs as well.  The fun was all the fellowship and comradely among friends and family when out in the fresh air under calm sky, with a nice telescope.  While it has been 22 years since I left the Miami area and most of our friends there the group must still be the same old nice folks as before.  We were such a lively and active group of observers back then.  Sadly, many of them are gone to the big observatory in the sky now.

 

Much of that stuff we did back then is vaporizing from the Internet, for some reason, and the articles have disappeared into the bit bucket.  Carlos Hernandez has been busy at doctoring so he rarely comes on CN these days; but he was a big part of our gang in the days done by.   He posted several thread about this subject here somewhere.

 

Also, for some strange reason I cannot FTP to the ALPO site and on my Mars Observers Café, ( http://www.alpo-astr...eish/index.html ) so revising or adding files is nearly impossible.  The ALPO site was migrated onto a new provider and ever since then I'm dead in the water.


Edited by Jeff B1, 24 October 2018 - 03:44 PM.

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#57 Bomber Bob

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:41 PM

[... and the Mods delete Post #57 in 5... 4... 3... 2... 1...]


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#58 Rick Runcie

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:54 PM

I remember it well, had my 12 1/2" Cave and a 20" F-5 set up in my in-laws backyard for the event. Previously I had a heated discussion with my wife's, at the time, Aunt who was a doctor. I had said that I believed that there would be some sort of disturbance on Jupiter that we would be able to observe after the impact occurred she basically berated me saying that no amateur telescope could show any sort of Mark on another planet caused by a comet impact and that I had no idea what I was talking. Well about 2 hours later everybody stood with their mouths touching the ground at the unbelievable detail that rotated into view it was a memorable evening for many reasons. Seeing those impact sites looking like a black eye with an eyebrow was something I'll never forget
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#59 Rick Runcie

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 08:56 PM

By the way, 12 1/2" Cave gave the best view by far!
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#60 rolo

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Posted 24 October 2018 - 09:05 PM

By the way, 12 1/2" Cave gave the best view by far!

 

I can vouch for that...



#61 psybiggs

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Posted 25 October 2018 - 10:42 PM

SL9: I observed over many nights through my Celestron C4.5...  It was remarkable how distinct the dark markings were.

 

Apropos, Hale Bop and Hyakutake, it was pretty cool how bright the former was and how it was visible for weeks and weeks, but Hyakutake was by far one of the most fantastic sights I've ever seen, from Mag 6.0+ dark northern Ontario skies right around closest approach, it was magical, nearly directly overhead, huge and detailed to the naked eye.  I haven't seen anything like it since, 


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#62 Jeff B1

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 06:46 AM

Glad you mentioned comet Hyakutake.  Can’t even remember when it was but several of us, Don and Mo Parker, Tippy and Patty D‘Auria, and maybe Carlos Hernandez, and I drove way out on Loop Road, down in the Everglades off US 41, to photograph it.  We were deep into the Glades with wild beasts and gators yelling at us in really dark sky.  The comet seemed to stretch nearly across the sky.   I had seen many comets before but none was as bright and long as Hyakutake.

 

I must have see Comet West and Hale Bop, but my memory is foggy.  My first comet I a telescope was Kohoutek!


Edited by Jeff B1, 26 October 2018 - 08:49 AM.

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#63 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 08:38 AM

This is fascinating   because  I though Hyakutake was very nice from Connecticut, granted I had little comet viewing experience,  until Hale Bop came and  was so much better. This was my experience here in the northeast.   I think it was mentioned earlier in this thread that Hyakutake seemed just weird....dim at times    and that Hale bop was a great comet  but nothing like Comet West from 1976? See Chuck's post 27

 

 I was 18 when Comet West came blazing by and we saw it ...  thought it was cool and went right on back to the distractions of an 18 year old's life  I hardly remember it...

 

 So is it possible that the comet was better placed in certain locations? Was it because it was higher in some skies than others  Was it seeing conditions?

 

Love to see another naked eye comet of some proportion now that I am older and less distracted by life, work and what have you...….


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 26 October 2018 - 08:40 AM.

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#64 rolo

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 08:39 AM

"Glad you mentioned comet Hyakutake.  Can’t even remember when it was but several of us, Don and Mo Parker, Tippy and Patty D‘Auria, and maybe Carlos Hernandez, and I drove way out on Loop Road, down in the Everglades off US 41, to photograph it.  We were deep into the Glades with wild beasts and gators yelling at us in really dark sky.  The comet seemed to stretch nearly across the sky.   I had seem many comets before but none was as brioht and long as Hyakutake."

 

 

Jeff, I use to frequent Loop Rd, certainly a wild and scary place specially at night. About as deep into Big Cypress as you could get in a car. Took this pics in 2009  on my last visit before kidney disease...

Attached Thumbnails

  • LOOP.jpg
  • LOOP-2.jpg
  • LOOP-1.jpg

Edited by rolo, 26 October 2018 - 08:42 AM.

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#65 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 08:41 AM

Rolo

 

You were pretty darn good with a camera years ago  as well as the present


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#66 rolo

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 08:49 AM

Rolo

 

You were pretty darn good with a camera years ago  as well as the present

Thanks....Wildlife photography(mainly birding) was my main hobby before Dialysis.I have hundreds if not thousands of pics from the Glades. Here's one more from Loop Rd, taken with film and scanned...Nikon 500mm f/4 & Nikon F4s

Attached Thumbnails

  • OWL.JPG

Edited by rolo, 26 October 2018 - 08:53 AM.

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#67 Jeff B1

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 08:58 AM

Wow rolo, man those are nice photos and Loop Road looks nearly gone. In the 1980’s Loop Road looked like your photos from were it ends at Monroe Station.  We used to drive it as far as possible back in the day.  Wild life subjects are plentiful out there for sure.  I take a lot of it around here at home.

 

Forgot, we were standing in the dark talking when a Miccosukee whizzed by us on a bike and scared the wits out of us. 


Edited by Jeff B1, 26 October 2018 - 09:00 AM.

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#68 terraclarke

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 09:59 AM

IN THE DAYS OF THE COMETS

 

Like I said in a previous post in this thread, Ikeya-Seki (1965) was my first real comet. My only observing instruments at the time was my then new 60mm Mayflower model 814 and a pair of 8x40 Japanese-made Herters binoculars that I’d gotten a year earlier. I had only been into the hobby of astronomy for a year or so, and the lack of observing experience plus the facts that I lived in the (then far less) light polluted suburbs, and that I was a highschool kid with as yet no driver’s license, hindered my experience. I had to hound my parents into either taking me to the mountains in the early morning hours or letting me go with friends. That said, as you might guess, I think that happened maybe two or three times, under less than favorable circumstances. So I was unable to ‘savor’ that august comet’s development throughout its fantastic apparition. Even so, I did get one really good view of it from a mountaintop near its perihelion around the end of November, but after a succession of failed attempts. That was my comet of the 1960s.

 

Then there was Comet Kohoutek in 1973. Wow! So much pre-apparition hype. It was to be the comet of the century and I was ready and armed with my homebuilt 6” F4.5 Newronian on an Edmunt eq. mount. Well Kohoutek totally fizzled, and so did much of the comet-seeking public’s enthusiasm for comet-watching. Despite my being armed with a suitable viewing instrument and a vehicle by then, the comet can only be described as a huge disappointment. So three years later in ‘76, when Comet West wheeled around, I was less than enthusiastic! I think I may have still been taking S&T but I can’t remember, as I had little pleasure-reading time and even less observing time- I was deeply involved in finishing my fieldwork and labwork for my doctoral dissertation, putting together a committee, doing outlines, starting writing etc. Of course, I was no longer in a club either due to lack of free time, and so no astro-community and little knowledge of what was happening in the night sky at the time. That said, I have little recollection of West other than people talking about how great it was years later. I am sorry to this day that I missed out. Form what I have been told and the pictures that I’ve sen, West must have been quite something. Unfortunately, not for me. And so ended the 1970s for me comet-wise.

 

As soon as the ‘80s began, so did Halley-fever! This was The Comet! The one I had looked forward to since I was a kid, even way before I had a telescope or would call myself an amateur astronomer. By then I had taken a university position several thousand miles away from my Southern California home and as Halley slowly and inexorably drew closer, life was changing for me as well. I had two little girls, ages three and one by around 1984 when the comet-hype really began to kick in. Also I was up for tenure and totally wrapped up in the whole ‘publish or perish’ game. Again, I found myself with little to no observing time, and no club or astro-community. As I remember, I think I was taking Astronomy Magazine and keeping abreast of things that way. Still this was to be The Great Comet. Unfortunately, the 6” reflector I had built prior to graduating high school, was still at my parents house in Southern California and the only instruments I had at hand were again, my trusty 60mm Mayflower and my 8x40 binoculars. I was also living in a much more light-polluted location. However I did manage to find the little fuzz-ball several times from my backyard. Finally, when Halley was approaching perihelion in 1986 I had tenure and things were relaxed a bit more relaxed in my life. That spring break I was able to take a week for us to go out and see my folks, and from there I went down to a very dark area in the Anza Borrego Desert (Clark Valley- no relation) for an overnight campout with my now reunited 6” F4.5 Newt. Hoping to see the comet’s tail stretching majestically across the sky, I was disappointed to say the least. As far as I remember, it was barely naked eye with no discernible tail and appearing both naked eye and in the scope as somethin akin in size and brightness to M31 or M42. The ‘80s closed out with another comet-letdown.

 

And then came the 1990s. This for me, was what I call the ‘Decade of Comets’! Thirty years of cometary disappointments were finally rewarded with three amazing Comets, in three amazing years. Shoemaker-Levy 9 in ‘94, Hale-Bopp in ‘95, and Hyakutake in ‘96. All were show-stoppers in their own way; one crashing into a planet as the world watched, and two bright naked eye comets with very visible tails, visible even from my suburban home. And of course, the little Mayflower that my folks had given me thirty years earlier, along with the now-old 8x40s and a brand new pair of 20x80s were by my side. The weather cooperated fully all through each event which lasted for weeks. Night after night we watched the S-L9 smoke plumes track across Jupiter and finally merge into a single dark band; night after night during the next two years we watched a ghostly naked-eye comet march across the sky for a period of several weeks. How could it get any better than this!?

 

Well the ‘90s ended and so did the comets for me. Comets, by tradition are harbingers of change, and unknown to me at the time, they foretold big changes upcoming in my life. In the early ‘00s I got a divorce, took an early retirement, sold the telescopes that I had acquired over the previous few years, and moving again. I basically started out all over, on my own. By then my kids were grown, I got a condo by myself in another city, another state. I took a totally different job (as a flight attendant with a major airline), and left astronomy for several years. Living right in the midst of a large city, in a third floor walk-up, and being gone most of the time, I had little need of telescopes. Then as the first decade of the 2000s drew to a close, I wound up changing again, moving again. I left the airlines, settling down again, and took a visiting professor job at a small college for a few of years. I bought a house that now had a deck and a backyard, and I again acquired some telescopes, and got back into the hobby after my ‘astronomy sabbatical’. And so ended the ‘00s.

 

So here I am, retired again, more than eight years into the Teens. There has only been one comet for me this decade. I can’t even remember it’s name. However, I do remember viewing it over several weeks, (in February I think?), a couple of years ago. It put on a nice show from my deck, as seen in a little short-tube 80 that I built. Seems I only watched it in that, and in a pair of 12x60s that I had purchased about 10 years prior. So whatever comet you were, thanks for the memories! You were a nice little comet.

 

I wonder if the ‘20s will be a good decade for comets? I hope so!


Edited by terraclarke, 26 October 2018 - 12:00 PM.

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#69 rolo

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 12:00 PM

I’m really enjoying reading y’alls stories! Lots of nice interesting memories. I appreciate y’all!


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#70 Jeff B1

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 12:33 PM

Speaking of comets and thanks to Dave Mitsky for reminding me, the last one I observed, C/2011 L4 PanSTARRS, was during a few nights of March 30 – April 7, 2013.  For some reason my observational report is lost in the huge pile in my office.  My 16" f/6.9 was pointed so far north I was hanging on the ladder like a Opossum .  smile.gif    

 

It traversed by M31 so I must have made a drawing then.  Don Parker had called earlier to advise me of the comet and while at the eyepiece was on the phone detailing to Don what it looked like visually. He was busy running his camera and couldn't see it very well in his finder.  So there we were yakking away and I was hanging on for dear life to the ladder telling him what I was seeing.  cool.gif   He was hanging onto his ladder as well.  Some day the drawing will appear in the pile.

 

 

BTW, here is another very fast apparent comet, Austin 1982g drawing.  Was using my 12.5” f/30 Classical Cassegrain at absurdly high magnifications.

 

 

1982-08-27&28_Austin-JDB.jpg


Edited by Jeff B1, 26 October 2018 - 12:35 PM.

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#71 rogue river art

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 12:39 PM

I was in the mountains of socal near RTMC with my home made 4" refractor and cannon AE1 and I got pictures like the one posted earlier. I also got to see it through a ccd camera someone else had. Very impressive. Glad it was Jupiter not Earth. Things would be quite different here.


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#72 terraclarke

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 01:47 PM

Here it would have been a mass extinction event the likes of which the Earth hasn’t seen since the end of the Cretaceous ~65 m.y.a. I wonder how many humans would still be living had it been here and not there?


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#73 psybiggs

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 02:03 PM

Glad you mentioned comet Hyakutake.  Can’t even remember when it was but several of us, Don and Mo Parker, Tippy and Patty D‘Auria, and maybe Carlos Hernandez, and I drove way out on Loop Road, down in the Everglades off US 41, to photograph it.  We were deep into the Glades with wild beasts and gators yelling at us in really dark sky.  The comet seemed to stretch nearly across the sky.   I had seen many comets before but none was as bright and long as Hyakutake.

 

I must have see Comet West and Hale Bop, but my memory is foggy.  My first comet I a telescope was Kohoutek!

Jeff, we had the same experience, it felt like the comet stretched across the sky....


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#74 Jeff B1

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 03:27 PM

While looking for another comet drawing I found Halley!   Rough sketch at telescope, the sweetened drawings sent to ALPO.

 

Halley18521106.jpg

 

Halley18521108.jpg

 


Edited by Jeff B1, 26 October 2018 - 04:05 PM.

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#75 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 26 October 2018 - 07:17 PM

Haley   What was your experience...?

i have alreayd mentioned my trip to florida  my arrest and release on the Tar Mac at the Space center.  But I still think Haley looked better  when it was farther away in March because the tail was exposed.. but when in April it was closest  the tail seemed to be hidden mostly behing the comet... so It was somewhat of a let down     I left my first law job    broke my leg    traveled to Florida for the closest approach and I still feel it was  a let down   Obviously   it was  a life time of anticpation  from third grade until 1985/84 qand that may have contributed to the let down....

 

Someone please summon a comet for all of us....

 

Terra   great story  and I do like how folks somehow came back to astronomy after periods of no viewing    

 

"Life is what happens to you when you are busy making other plans" 

John Lennon


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 26 October 2018 - 07:19 PM.

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