Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

A 10 inch dob- good enough?

dob reflector
  • Please log in to reply
78 replies to this topic

#1 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 05:43 AM

Hi guys
I have been offered by my daddy that as a gift I can either buy some eyepieces or filters or I can wait for 2 years and get a 10 inch dobsonian. I am that kind of person-opted for the 10 inch. I already own a 5 inch scope. So would a 10 inch scope with 1250mm focal length be good enough for DSO and planetary observing.
Clear skies

#2 Waddensky

Waddensky

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 139
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2017
  • Loc: The Netherlands

Posted 28 October 2018 - 06:21 AM

A 10 inch dobson is a great scope for deep-sky observing and a huge step up from a 5 inch. What kind of telescope do you own now?
  • MrJim, havasman and Redbetter like this

#3 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 06:39 AM

A 5 inch reflector now. My main problem is planetary viewing. Will it give me decent views? Any photo for reference please?
Thanks

#4 Steve D.

Steve D.

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1094
  • Joined: 29 Jul 2007
  • Loc: Woodstock, GA

Posted 28 October 2018 - 06:43 AM

I had an Orion XT10 in the past and a 8 inch dob now.   Both provide amazing planetary views.  A 10 incher is a great all around scope.


  • Jon Isaacs, MrJim, havasman and 1 other like this

#5 OleCuss

OleCuss

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1897
  • Joined: 22 Nov 2010

Posted 28 October 2018 - 06:58 AM

I'm personally not a fan of the typical commercial 10" Dobsonians.  The amount of aberration is just too much for me unless you plug in a coma corrector or use premium eyepieces.

 

I find the 8" Dobsonians much more pleasing due to the somewhat slower optics.

 

I think most people would prefer the 10" Dobsonians so I'm in the minority.  And if I can afford the good coma corrector I'll tend to join the majority.

 

And yes, that light-gathering and focal length are great for many uses if you are more tolerant of the aberrations than am I or (if you are as bothered as am I) if you take care of them with the additional optics.


  • Jimmy462 likes this

#6 mvas

mvas

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1246
  • Joined: 27 May 2015
  • Loc: Eastern Ohio

Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:17 AM

A 5 inch reflector now. My main problem is planetary viewing. Will it give me decent views? Any photo for reference please?
Thanks

Above 5" diameter, when viewing planets ... it is the quality, not the size.


  • azure1961p and Jimmy462 like this

#7 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:24 AM

Above 5" diameter, when viewing planets ... it is the quality, not the size.

If I say quality is perfect?

#8 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:26 AM

What can it show me on planets. Like how would be the GRS. What details would Saturn and Mars show?
Hope to get some great advice here.
Thanks

#9 Jimmy462

Jimmy462

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 258
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2014
  • Loc: Putnam County, NY

Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:53 AM

Hi Orion1802,

 

As others have mentioned here, depending on the quality of the optics and mechanical components (i.e. OTA, mount, focuser, finder, etc.) a 5-inch reflector can be a very capable and satisfying instrument with which to observe "DSO and planetary" objects. And this holds true for the eyepieces being used, as well.

 

Could you be specific as to which telescope and eyepieces (brand and model) you are currently using? It will help those of us following this thread to better understand your current observing experiences and help us to offer guidance and suggestions as to how to best move forward!

 

Looking forward to hearing back from you!

 

:)

Jimmy G



#10 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 72980
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 28 October 2018 - 07:53 AM

Above 5" diameter, when viewing planets ... it is the quality, not the size.

 

The most important factor is the seeing,  the stability of the atmosphere.  But in my experience , given good seeing,  my 15 year old 10 inch Taiwanese Dob outperformed my 120 mm Orion ED refractor .  For a 120 mm , the 120mm Eon did a very good job but the increased resolution and contrast transfer of the 10 inch was too much for it. Comparing a 5 inch reflector with a 10 inch will be even more dramatic .  

 

Jon


  • SteveG, Asbytec, Scott Rose and 6 others like this

#11 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:05 AM

Well I use a Celestron Astromaster 130EQ with an Astromaster accessory kit. To be honest I am not a beginner..I have much experience. But still as I have only 1 week for the choice (the dob is not final) I thought it would be good to take advice from all of you. If the results would not be that good then I would instead spend in filters and eyepieces.
Thanks

Edited by Orion1802, 28 October 2018 - 08:06 AM.


#12 Myk Rian

Myk Rian

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 704
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2017
  • Loc: Hartland, Michigan

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:19 AM



To be honest I am not a beginner..I have much experience.

At 14 years of age?
Anyway, I prefer my refractors for planetary viewing. The dobs work best for DSO.


Tapatalk on SGS7
  • Sean Wood and Jon_Doh like this

#13 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:22 AM


At 14 years of age?
Anyway, I prefer my refractors for planetary viewing. The dobs work best for DSO.


Tapatalk on SGS7

Lol
Spent 3 months researching before buying my first scope

#14 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 13635
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:28 AM

If given the choice between eyepeices for your current scope and a 10" Dob, I'd take the Dob everytime.

Sounds like the deal is still being negotiated. See if you can get some eyepeice tossed in with the 2 year wait. :)

Or, you could ask for a nice set of eyepeices suited for a 10" f/5 Dob now, then save a few bucks and buy the Dob yourself in a few months. No long wait.

Then Christmas is just around the corner. Is this a Christmas gift? You're 14 years old? Is your father waiting till your 16th birthday?

Edited by Asbytec, 28 October 2018 - 08:37 AM.

  • gene 4181 and nuvax like this

#15 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:36 AM

If given the choice between eyepeices for your current scope and a 10" Dob, I'd take the Dob everytime.

Sounds like the deal is still being negotiated. See if you can get some eyepeice tossed in with the 2 year wait. smile.gif

Or, you could ask for a nice set of eyepeices suited for a 10" f/5 Dob now, then save a few bucks and buy the Dob yourself in a few months. No long wait.

We all have aperture fever grin.gif

I already have theses eyepieces-

20mm,15mm,10mm,6mm and a 2X Barlow. With the dobsonians I get one 25mm and one 9mm eyepiece. I already have 80A and 25A filter along with a moon filter.

Are these enough?



#16 mvas

mvas

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1246
  • Joined: 27 May 2015
  • Loc: Eastern Ohio

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:38 AM

What can it show me on planets. Like how would be the GRS. What details would Saturn and Mars show?
Hope to get some great advice here.
Thanks

Actual view thru an 8" Reflector ...

https://www.youtube....h?v=ProOhknvS3o

 

Why are you not seeing great views of Jupiter and Saturn already, with your 5" Celestron Astro-Master?

 

A good 10" vs 5", will gain another magnitude dimmer for DSO ( ~14.5 mag vs ~13 mag )

A good 10" vs 5", will get you sharper details on the planets - if permitted by your "seeing" conditions

 

You choice of 10" f/5 is good for DSO, but is quite fast for high power on planets.

I routinely use 200x power on Jupiter & Saturn, on a precisely collimated Research Grade 12.5" f/6 Reflector and it is spectacular.


Edited by mvas, 28 October 2018 - 08:39 AM.

  • Jimmy462 likes this

#17 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 13635
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:42 AM

I already have theses eyepieces-
20mm,15mm,10mm,6mm and a 2X Barlow. With the dobsonians I get one 25mm and one 9mm eyepiece. I already have 80A and 25A filter along with a moon filter.
Are these enough?

The focal lenghts look fine, what kind of eyepeices? I was talking about something with a semi wide field of view. I mean, dont stiff dear old dad for expensive set. Not my intent. Your father may even advise you. In fact, Id urge you to talk it over with him.

But, to answer your question. Yes. A 10" is plenty of aperture. IMO. Planets will show plenty of detail to keep you busy including the GRS, Martian polar caps and maria, Saturn and it's rings are stunning, and much more. Your local seeing conditions will determine how much is seen on a given night.

Get the Dob, even if it means using your 130 for a while. Spend the time training yourself to get the most from a smaller aperture. The experience will pay dividends when you get the 10".

Edited by Asbytec, 28 October 2018 - 09:01 AM.

  • Jon Isaacs, Jeff B, MrJim and 2 others like this

#18 mvas

mvas

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1246
  • Joined: 27 May 2015
  • Loc: Eastern Ohio

Posted 28 October 2018 - 08:48 AM

A comparison ...

 

What Can You See With Different Telescopes ?

=============================

 

#1 - Small    = 3"

#2 - Medium = 6"

#3 - Large    = 10"

 

http://www.deepskywa...-telescope.html


Edited by mvas, 28 October 2018 - 08:50 AM.

  • JKAstro, WyattDavis and Jimmy462 like this

#19 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:03 AM

I am getting good views through my 5 inch scope but I thought to give it a boost. You know like more DSOs, more detail on planets and other things. I sometimes use up to 216 magnification with my 5 inch. Will try to crank it up to 416 in 10 inchwink.gif



#20 Jimmy462

Jimmy462

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 258
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2014
  • Loc: Putnam County, NY

Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:05 AM

Hi again,

 

Well, the Celestron Astromaster 130EQ certainly looks to be a well-constructed 5.1" f/5 Newtonian on a reasonably well-performing EQ mount from one of the, um, "top name" commercial telescope makers which, depending on one's needs and abilities, should offer some fine observing experiences, IMO.

 

However, you're currently being offered a choice between an upgrade option to go with a 10-inch Dobsonian Newtonian or to add eyepieces to your current scope and it would seem to me that the added aperture and focal length of a 10-inch Dob will offer you greater resolving power and magnification for both DSO and planet viewing where merely getting new eyepieces for your current scope will (depending on the choices) only help the scope further reach its limitations.

 

Thinking back to my youth, 2-years seems like an awfully long time to wait (it took me over a year of putting aside my paper route money to save up for a 4.25-inch Newtonian!), so I feel your pain! Would you have to wait the same amount of time for the eyepieces?

 

And you've got me to thinking about my resilience which I learned and picked up from back in those days..."where there's challenges, there's also opportunities and solutions"! So it would seem to me that your current choice is to continue-on with what you've currently got and learn what the 5-inch scope can teach you about the night sky and observing (there are a ton of, um, "smaller aperture" observers here on the forums so there's absolutely no shame in that!)...

 

What do you think of a 5 inch telescope? - Beginners Forum - Cloudy Nights:

https://www.cloudyni...inch-telescope/

 

Barlow and/or small eyepieces for Celestron Astromaster 130Eq - Beginners Forum - Cloudy Nights:

https://www.cloudyni...romaster-130eq/

 

...or figure out a way to parlay your current resources and talents and abilities and figure out a pathway to the attaining the larger scope!

 

So, I'm curious, are you and your dad considering only buying "new" for the 10-inch telescope or eyepieces options or have you both considered the cost-savings in buying used?

 

Hope this was helpful, :)

Jimmy G


  • Asbytec likes this

#21 coopman

coopman

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5246
  • Joined: 23 Apr 2006
  • Loc: South Louisiana

Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:12 AM

A 10" is a BIG upgrade over your current 5".  4 times the light gathering power and much finer detail resolution.  Globular clusters such as M13 that don't look all that impressive in the 5" will be resolved into huge balls of stars.  Everything that you look at will be much brighter.  I have been observing since I was about 11 and my largest scope is a 10" Dob.  Stick with good brands such as Orion, Apertura, Skywatcher.  Two years is a long time to have to wait though.  Can you talk your Dad into getting it for you sooner?  Maybe you can do some chores or extra stuff to earn some money to help pay for it.  Raking up leaves and pine straw off of lawns is about to be a big deal for a lot of people.         


  • Jimmy462 likes this

#22 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:36 AM

Hey clay,

I se you own a GSO Dob. That's the same I'm buying. And wait reduced from 2 to 1.5 years;)

Clear skies



#23 Orion1802

Orion1802

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 45
  • Joined: 10 Sep 2018

Posted 28 October 2018 - 09:40 AM

Jimmy G,

I wanted to know once that as mvas above said "an increase of 1 magnitude, from 13 to 14.5" if the limiting magnitude increases only by 1 then what other significant changes do DSOs show?

Thanks



#24 rubberfish

rubberfish

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 56
  • Joined: 01 Oct 2018
  • Loc: Langley B.C.

Posted 28 October 2018 - 10:00 AM

Orion1802

Wait and get the 10" DOB. You'll be so happy with it.



#25 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 72980
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 28 October 2018 - 10:34 AM

Jimmy G,

I wanted to know once that as mvas above said "an increase of 1 magnitude, from 13 to 14.5" if the limiting magnitude increases only by 1 then what other significant changes do DSOs show?

Thanks

 

The differences between a 5 inch and a 10 inch is dramatic..jon


  • Kutno, MrJim and Jimmy462 like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: dob, reflector



Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics