Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Wind Break (test results)

  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#1 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 29 October 2018 - 10:03 PM

Of all the headaches I've experienced when trying to image at a remote site, wind has caused about 50% of them. For the last few outings, I've used my own version of what is essentially a Sky Box design pioneered by John Love. It held up very nicely in strong Nevada and Colorado winds, but I could tell that my scope was still being affected by some turbulence inside the box. I'm about the same height as my rig, and my hair was getting blown around a little bit. Making the box taller was an obvious solution but it came at a cost of viewing (imaging) angles. 

 

IMG-4287.jpg

My scope is just below the top of the box. 

 

There have been several threads on wind breaks, but none permit any definitive conclusions on the best way to deal with wind at imaging sites:

 

https://www.cloudyni...ucer/?p=8653220

https://www.cloudyni...wind/?p=8639508

https://www.cloudyni...tall/?p=8313700

https://www.cloudyni...wind/?p=8023086

https://www.cloudyni...reak/?p=7439134

https://www.cloudyni...ites/?p=7403816

 

The Sky Box seemed to be the best option, so that's what I tried first. But I knew that some of the other ideas - particularly about mesh screens - warranted some testing. 

 

If you can't tell from the photo above, a solid tarp takes a beating in the wind. The windward face experiences enormous pressure and even subtle changes in wind direction cause thunderous flapping of the tarp. I wondered if putting a 70% mesh wall in front would help, so I set up a little experiment:

 

IMG-4368.jpg

All wind speeds are 15 second averages.

 

I set up an anemometer downwind of a large fan. I drilled holes to experiment with wind break placement (and material). Fully exposed, the wind speed at the anemometer (telescope) position was 8.2 mph. 

 

The first thing I tried was my standard "Sky Box" setup - solid tarp walls rising just above the top of the anemometer.

 

IMG-4370.jpg

 

The wind speed at the telescope position was 1.1 mph. Not bad at all, and I suspect that for most people that a ~90% reduction in wind speed is a completely satisfactory result. But I need to remember that my wind break will see 20-30 mph gusts, which would put the wind speed at my scope around 2.5 to 4 mph. And that's to say nothing of the worrisome strain on the structure itself. So if you image in more extreme environments and/or are just one for overkill, read on.

 

After trying various material combinations and layouts, I landed on the winner: a solid tarp box with a wall height just over the height of the telescope (to maximize visibility), with a large 70% mesh wall about 6 feet in front (the windward side). 

 

IMG-4371.jpg

 

The scale of my model is such that 1 inch  = 1 foot in real life. In this hypothetical setup, the tarp box measured 10' x 10' x7' (the telescope height being 6.5'), the mesh wall was 6' in front of the box and measured 14' wide x 10' tall. I know, that's huge. But it reduced the wind speed at the telescope position to zero. When I reduced the height of the mesh wall to 8', I had to bring it 4' closer (so 2' in front of) the box and it was almost as good with a reading of .2 mph.

 

The leading mesh wall is obviously overkill for most people but it accomplishes two objectives: (1) it eliminates wind at the telescope position while preserving good visibility, and (2) it dramatically reduces the strain on the tarp box structure and (hopefully) will quiet the "thunder flap" effect when winds change direction.

 

IMG-4373.jpg

 

With the mesh wall 6' in front, the wind speed in front of the box was 0 mph - keep in mind, that's down from 8.2 mph.

 

IMG-4377-2.jpg

With the mesh wall extending 2' beyond the width of the box, the wind speed on the side of the box was 1.5 mph.

 

Other interesting things I learned:

 

1. 70% mesh on it's own is actually surprisingly effective.

2. Leaving a 6" gap at the floor of the tarp box made no measurable difference on the wind speed at the telescope position.

 

Hope this helps. I'll update with full scale results the next time I'm in the field.

 

Joe

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • D_talley, pedxing, OleCuss and 7 others like this

#2 jimr2

jimr2

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 844
  • Joined: 26 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Sparks, NV

Posted 29 October 2018 - 11:14 PM

Good work Joe, thanks for the data!

 

P.S. Your pic of your wind box in action looks like it's somewhere in NV??

 

-jim-



#3 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 29 October 2018 - 11:26 PM

Good work Joe, thanks for the data!

 

P.S. Your pic of your wind box in action looks like it's somewhere in NV??

 

-jim-

Yep - just outside of Tonopah. Amazing skies there but so...much...wind!



#4 dayglow

dayglow

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 226
  • Joined: 15 Aug 2013

Posted 30 October 2018 - 12:34 AM

How would you get the mesh screen to stand on its own ?


  • Stelios likes this

#5 jimr2

jimr2

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 844
  • Joined: 26 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Sparks, NV

Posted 30 October 2018 - 02:03 AM

Joe,

 

OK, thought I recognized the landscape (I just moved from Tonopah after being there 18 yrs)! Again, glad the "new" wind box is working so good for you--will definitely have to "borrow" some of your approach next time I'm out around Tonopah doing some observing (light pollution way too bad here in my new home of Reno-Sparks), as, as you say, it can get a bit breezy there!

 

Thanks again for the wind data and picture!

 

-jim-



#6 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 30 October 2018 - 08:22 AM

How would you get the mesh screen to stand on its own ?

 

Just two poles that are staked with guylines. Although to help combat shifting winds, I'll probably set up the mesh with a right angle (using three poles).

 

 

Joe,

 

OK, thought I recognized the landscape (I just moved from Tonopah after being there 18 yrs)! Again, glad the "new" wind box is working so good for you--will definitely have to "borrow" some of your approach next time I'm out around Tonopah doing some observing (light pollution way too bad here in my new home of Reno-Sparks), as, as you say, it can get a bit breezy there!

 

Thanks again for the wind data and picture!

 

-jim-

Thanks Jim! I was hoping to head out this weekend but it doesn't look like the weather will clear until Monday night. I'm anxious to try this out at full scale!



#7 TelescopeGreg

TelescopeGreg

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,523
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2018
  • Loc: Auburn, California, USA

Posted 30 October 2018 - 08:27 PM

Would it help to have a "corner" aimed into the wind, for example, a 3rd pole in the middle of the mesh, set a few feet farther out from the telescope box?  The idea would be guide the wind to the sides.  Less resistance, so perhaps less turbulence.


  • BinoGuy likes this

#8 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 30 October 2018 - 08:38 PM

Would it help to have a "corner" aimed into the wind, for example, a 3rd pole in the middle of the mesh, set a few feet farther out from the telescope box?  The idea would be guide the wind to the sides.  Less resistance, so perhaps less turbulence.

That's exactly how I'm going to set up in Nevada on Monday night (weather permitting). I'll update here with real world results!



#9 CCD-Freak

CCD-Freak

    Vendor - Portable Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 2,116
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Whitesboro,Texas

Posted 30 October 2018 - 08:54 PM

Good work...It will be interesting to see how your real life results turn out.   I like your "wind tunnel".  

Most of the time the SkyBox alone is enough and when it's not I sometimes put a partial roof on the windward side to smooth out the airflow over the wall which helps.  

 

SB-8x12-02-sm.jpg

 

Your approach is novel and may even be more effective. Let us know how it works.

 

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX


Edited by CCD-Freak, 30 October 2018 - 08:57 PM.

  • wcoastsands likes this

#10 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 30 October 2018 - 10:00 PM

Good work...It will be interesting to see how your real life results turn out.   I like your "wind tunnel".  

Most of the time the SkyBox alone is enough and when it's not I sometimes put a partial roof on the windward side to smooth out the airflow over the wall which helps.  

 

attachicon.gif SB-8x12-02-sm.jpg

 

Your approach is novel and may even be more effective. Let us know how it works.

 

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX

Thanks John! Believe me when I say I think I've read everything you've posted regarding the Sky Box. In my opinion it is a must have for portable imaging.

 

Joe


  • CCD-Freak likes this

#11 CCD-Freak

CCD-Freak

    Vendor - Portable Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 2,116
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Whitesboro,Texas

Posted 30 October 2018 - 10:24 PM

Thanks John! Believe me when I say I think I've read everything you've posted regarding the Sky Box. In my opinion it is a must have for portable imaging.

 

Joe

It is that....there have been many nights it made the difference between imaging or going to bed.  After the winds at Okie-Tex 2006 and 2007 my buddy Wes and I decided we needed to figure out something to deal with the wind.  We built the first SkyBox back in 2008 and it was a "game changer"  for sure.  

 

SkyBoxes at Okie-Tex-2.JPG

 

BTW....I like you observing site...what a view!

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX


Edited by CCD-Freak, 30 October 2018 - 10:25 PM.

  • wcoastsands and sunnyday like this

#12 Makelo215

Makelo215

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 20
  • Joined: 22 Aug 2018
  • Loc: Oregon

Posted 31 October 2018 - 12:16 AM

Thanks for the practical scientific approach and experiments with the second mesh wall.  I really like the photos and obvious attention to detail.

 

For many years, I have been building a tarp based wind wall with just two sides when we visit the Oregon coast.  Basically three posts with the one in the middle upwind of the other two.  This can turn a miserable wind swept day at the beach into a pleasant day of laying in the sun and watching the waves.  For the two sided wall, I like to set four lawn chairs up in the middle and have about 6' extra on each side beyond any people, because the wind likes to swirl around the edge.  I have a 6' tall blue tarp with solid-steel cattle fence stakes.  Its easy to set up, just pound the stakes in the sand.   When we are done, roll it up and throw in the truck.  I have experimented with some different shapes, but I like a wide open wall ~120 degree angle the best.

 

Now with this new data, I can't wait to experiment with adding the second mesh wall.  If it will help reduce the wind gusts swirling in over the top, that will be fantastic!


  • BinoGuy likes this

#13 Waber

Waber

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 113
  • Joined: 16 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Westminster, CO

Posted 31 October 2018 - 11:55 AM

Where can I purchase the materials to make my own SkyBox? Is there a standard item list I could copy for a DIY? Thanks!



#14 Waber

Waber

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 113
  • Joined: 16 Sep 2017
  • Loc: Westminster, CO

Posted 31 October 2018 - 12:13 PM

Joe and John, what are your experiences with dust when imaging in high wind and it's in an area with mostly dirt and no grass, or even dust in high winds in a grassy area? I went out once in 8 mph wind(I'm still a beginner so I just wanted to practice setting up and trying things out) and I could see so much dust floating around. I was on some farmland where there was dirt everywhere. I understand I should just find a better area but driving out to very dark skies in CO it seems like you can't find a grassy area.



#15 B 26354

B 26354

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,796
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2017
  • Loc: Southern California semi-desert (NELM mag 5.3)

Posted 31 October 2018 - 04:02 PM

@ ginjaninjaa... PM sent.



#16 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 31 October 2018 - 06:55 PM

Thanks for the practical scientific approach and experiments with the second mesh wall.  I really like the photos and obvious attention to detail.

 

For many years, I have been building a tarp based wind wall with just two sides when we visit the Oregon coast.  Basically three posts with the one in the middle upwind of the other two.  This can turn a miserable wind swept day at the beach into a pleasant day of laying in the sun and watching the waves.  For the two sided wall, I like to set four lawn chairs up in the middle and have about 6' extra on each side beyond any people, because the wind likes to swirl around the edge.  I have a 6' tall blue tarp with solid-steel cattle fence stakes.  Its easy to set up, just pound the stakes in the sand.   When we are done, roll it up and throw in the truck.  I have experimented with some different shapes, but I like a wide open wall ~120 degree angle the best.

 

Now with this new data, I can't wait to experiment with adding the second mesh wall.  If it will help reduce the wind gusts swirling in over the top, that will be fantastic!

Sounds like a plan! Obviously the second wall is highly dependent on other factors, like having the physical and social real estate to erect one :)

 

Where can I purchase the materials to make my own SkyBox? Is there a standard item list I could copy for a DIY? Thanks!

I recommend PMing John Love (CCD-Freak) who responded above. I believe he might still offer hardware kits that just require you to add your own conduit (which you then cut to the desired dimensions for your box).

 

Joe and John, what are your experiences with dust when imaging in high wind and it's in an area with mostly dirt and no grass, or even dust in high winds in a grassy area? I went out once in 8 mph wind(I'm still a beginner so I just wanted to practice setting up and trying things out) and I could see so much dust floating around. I was on some farmland where there was dirt everywhere. I understand I should just find a better area but driving out to very dark skies in CO it seems like you can't find a grassy area.

The solid tarp does a very good job at keeping dust out of the immediate way of the telescope, but it's obviously not going to magically improve seeing conditions across the board. At least, that was my experience in the desert. If you ever make your way west in the summer, you should try imaging on top of Independence Pass - that's my go to summer spot - it's at 12,000 feet and there is a nice little parking lot up there that is almost always empty :) 


  • Waber and wcoastsands like this

#17 CCD-Freak

CCD-Freak

    Vendor - Portable Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 2,116
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Whitesboro,Texas

Posted 01 November 2018 - 10:18 AM

Out west dust is just a fact of life.  The box will help some in the immediate area around your scope but if the wind is blowing hard enough to pick up dust it will be in the air and everywhere else.  I personally will take the dry and dust over humidity and dew.  

 

Oh...Yes I am still putting together SkyBox kits for my "Astro Buds".  (Astronomically inclined buddies)

 

JohnLove

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX


Edited by CCD-Freak, 01 November 2018 - 10:24 AM.

  • jdk likes this

#18 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 12 November 2018 - 11:40 PM

Update!

 

I had a chance to test my wind break and full scale and the results did not disappoint. I cannot overstate how much of a difference it made to have the mesh wall in front of the tarp box. I opted for a two sided, 90 degree mesh wall in order to protect against winds from the north and west. Winds easily reached 25+mph and my scope was never disturbed. 

 

440A6166.jpg

Getting to this point was difficult because my step ladder was a little too short. In the future I think I'm going to try a swiveling joint in the middle so I can open the wall up like a hinge. 

 

 

440A6168.jpg

With the mesh hung. 10' is tall! 

 

440A6169.jpg

Despite my indoor small scale tests that indicated the best distance between structures, I was afraid of extending the tarp box beyond the edges of the mesh. This was only about 3 feet from the mesh - it should have been about double that. Ultimately I did move it back. 

 

440A6170.jpg

You can see that the wind was blowing! It's difficult to appreciate the scale here - the tarp box is just about 7' tall. When it is all staked down, it is comically secure. 

 

440A6172.jpg

A peek under the hood. cool.gif  It's important to note that optimal equipment placement may not be in the center of your box - I actually ended up biasing mine way into the corner  in order to maximize imaging time on Orion and the Horsehead.

 

440A6181.jpg

Ready to image!

 

A few other relevant considerations: 

 

1. Next time I'll probably bring a mat of some kind to put down as a floor. With wind-born dust pretty well controlled, I became the most culpable generator of dust in the air by just shuffling around the box. 

 

2. I used a 30ft tarp as the walls of my box (~7ft sides). I only had one "seam" - I should have positioned it on the north side to make polar alignment easier. I had to undo two walls in order for my Polemaster to get a view of the pole. 

 

3. As I indicated above, the zone of maximum wind reduction behind the mesh wall is not directly behind the mesh, but some distance behind it (probably related to the height and density of the wall). That should be taken into consideration together with the intended imaging target when placing the scope in order to maximize protection and imaging time. 

 

happy imaging!

 

Joe


Edited by jdk, 12 November 2018 - 11:42 PM.

  • Waber, wcoastsands and sunnyday like this

#19 CCD-Freak

CCD-Freak

    Vendor - Portable Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 2,116
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Whitesboro,Texas

Posted 13 November 2018 - 11:32 PM

I use RV patio mats under my SkyBox. They work great to keep dust at bay and they breath so that condensation does not form on the underside.  Dirt doesn't stick to them much either.  They are supple so walking near the tripod legs doesn't cause problems.  

 

Glad your project is a success.  

 

IMG_4001-sm.JPG

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX


  • nateman_doo, wcoastsands and sunnyday like this

#20 jdk

jdk

    Messenger

  • *****
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 428
  • Joined: 06 Jul 2017

Posted 14 November 2018 - 11:30 AM

I use RV patio mats under my SkyBox. They work great to keep dust at bay and they breath so that condensation does not form on the underside.  Dirt doesn't stick to them much either.  They are supple so walking near the tripod legs doesn't cause problems.  

 

Glad your project is a success.  

 

attachicon.gif IMG_4001-sm.JPG

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX

Sold! Hopefully you're a believer that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Now I just need a little casita.... lol.gif  I am NOT spending another 20F night in an uninsulated tin can!


  • CCD-Freak likes this

#21 CCD-Freak

CCD-Freak

    Vendor - Portable Observatories

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 2,116
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2008
  • Loc: Whitesboro,Texas

Posted 14 November 2018 - 11:50 AM

My Casita aka "Moonlight Manor" was a "game changer" for me.   It is soooo nice to have a comfortable place to stay while out imaging in the boonies.  Having a bed, bathroom, kitchen and heat is great.  I have been comfortable out boondock imaging for up to 11 nights so far.    I am almost set up where I can operate everything from inside the Manor.  

 

Imaging at Ft Griffin sm.JPG

 

John Love

CCD-Freak

WD5IKX

 

 


  • BinoGuy and Soundboy121 like this

#22 AnakChan

AnakChan

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,236
  • Joined: 01 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Oz

Posted 29 October 2020 - 12:03 AM

Apologies for the necropost, but this is very interesting. I'm building my own version of a rudimentary Sky Box following the advice of Terry Robison from his AIC presentation back in May. I'm using mesh instead of shade cloth. I'm curious about this turbulence with w.r.t. to tarp. Is that specifically for a box design? i.e. if it it's something like the Clear View portable observatory tent, would that be more forgiving to using tarp in a more aerodynamically design? A colleague of mine makes the Octans Portable Observatory which is a scaled up version of the Clear View and structurally more robust (shameless plug for my video here to see what it looks like). But it's priced beyond my reach and I'm looking at my DIY Sky Box with a gazebo tent as how Terry has done it. Would double mesh walls alone be sufficient in reducing turbulence compared to a portable observatory?


  • B 26354 likes this

#23 B 26354

B 26354

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,796
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2017
  • Loc: Southern California semi-desert (NELM mag 5.3)

Posted 29 October 2020 - 12:49 PM

@ AnakChan

 

Very intriguing video. I found a link to the Octans Portable Observatory:

 

http://www.astronomy...le-observatory/

 

...but other than two photos and its price, there is no other information about it at all, on that website, so there is no indication as to its actual size or configuration. I did also find a Facebook link... but I don't subscribe to Facebook. I e-mailed the Astronomy Academy about it, and am awaiting a reply.

 

Do you know of any other sources of information about the Octans Portable Observatory? Did you utilize one yourself, on that trip?

 

Thanks in advance for any clarity you might be able to provide. grin.gif


Edited by B 26354, 29 October 2020 - 12:51 PM.


#24 AnakChan

AnakChan

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,236
  • Joined: 01 Sep 2014
  • Loc: Oz

Posted 29 October 2020 - 07:06 PM

@ AnakChan

 

Very intriguing video. I found a link to the Octans Portable Observatory:

 

http://www.astronomy...le-observatory/

 

...but other than two photos and its price, there is no other information about it at all, on that website, so there is no indication as to its actual size or configuration. I did also find a Facebook link... but I don't subscribe to Facebook. I e-mailed the Astronomy Academy about it, and am awaiting a reply.

 

Do you know of any other sources of information about the Octans Portable Observatory? Did you utilize one yourself, on that trip?

 

Thanks in advance for any clarity you might be able to provide. grin.gif

The chap who makes the Octans Portable Observatory is a friend of mine. I believe he has something like 3 left. Here’s some more info on it :-

 

A6C21D1B-F0E1-4036-AE2A-DC301A502C27.jpeg

 

I’ve got a timelapse which captured the setup of it (but at a distance): https://youtu.be/dKYrXTxXzc4

 

I’ll attach more pix of it into this post later. If you order one, let him know “Sean from your group” sent ya laugh.gif.

 

P.S. sorry about the photo rotation. It’s portrait on my iPad when I uploaded it!


Edited by AnakChan, 29 October 2020 - 07:07 PM.

  • B 26354 likes this

#25 B 26354

B 26354

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,796
  • Joined: 05 Jan 2017
  • Loc: Southern California semi-desert (NELM mag 5.3)

Posted 30 October 2020 - 01:33 AM

@ AnakChan

 

Thanks for that info... very helpful!

 

To allow others to more easily read it, here's what it says:

 

- - - - -

 

Octans Portable Observatory

 

The observatory... You have seen various iterations of portable observatories but all too often they just don't cut the mustard. This is where the Octans Portable Observatory (OPO) steps ahead.

 

Considered, Engineered, Aerodynamic and On Purpose.

 

Designed by a portable observer from Western Australia who has traveled everywhere from North W.A. to the interior near the Tanami desert, to the beautiful South West, Brendan has personally spent years refining the observatory to what you see here today.

 

Made from high quality materials with every detail engineered, thought about, trialed and tested. The OPO will protect your telescope from wind, light showers, UV, other people's light, and will reject heat during the hottest of days, due to the silver PU coated walls and roof.

 

The tent has been field tested up to 60 km/h gust winds, however in its daytime configuration is expected to exceed 100 km/h depending on your hold-down pegs, and with the current storm cover in development could see well in excess of 100 km/h, and Storm Proof!!!

 

During the night-time the OPO has protected the 300mm Newtonian you see here in winds over 30km/h. Just think about that, normally your night would be over with winds at 10 km/h.

 

Specifications:

 

Roof – 420D Polyester Oxford weave 122 gsm silver PU coated 2000mm head
2900mm opening (9' 6.2")

 

Walls - 420D Polyester Oxford weave 122 gsm silver PU coated 2000mm head Walls - 420D Polyester Oxford weave
1600mm height (5' 3")

 

Floor - 480 gsm PVC coated canvas heat joined - waterproof

3800mm octagon (12' 5.6")

 

2x entry doors

 

Poles – Main frame 11mm aluminium segmented

 

Poles – Windshield Hoops 9mm aluminium segmented

 

Poles - Windshield upstands – Telescopic aluminium up to 2900mm

 

Guy ropes 6mm braided cord and ABS moulded grips

 

- - - - -

 

I think that both the Octans Portable Observatory and the Clear View portable observatory tent are interesting approaches to the "portable observatory" problem... but I don't think that either one succeeds.

 

As I see it, the main problem is that these tents just aren't tall enough. The Clearview is only 5' tall, and the Octans is only 5'6"... neither of which is tall enough to shield a tripod-mounted telescope from either wind or nearby lights. Your very brief video seems to show an additional "partial" wind-screen attached to one of the Octans tents... but your spec sheet makes no mention of it, or what it actually is. Is it possibly a partially-folded-back roof?

 

Without any details as to the actual construction of the Octans, it's impossible to know how easy or difficult it is to set one up... but I've been a wilderness backpacker for more than sixty years, and having watched a video of what's involved and how long it took to set up one of the Clear View tents, it looks like it's a whole lot more trouble than it's worth. And considering the size of the Octans tent, I'd assume that it would be a two-person job.

 

I have yet to come up with a "transportable" wind/light-shield for my telescopes, but here's my own "driveway observatory":

 

Driveway Observatory - Small.jpg

 

Four separate 7'x10' PVC-tubing panels, with permanently-attached "privacy screening". I keep them leaning against the outside of my house, and fasten the panels together with 24"-long rubber-coated twist-ties. Takes me fifteen minutes to set it up, by myself.

 

grin.gif


  • AnakChan likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics