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What DSO did you just observe for the first time? Rate it 1 to 5.

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#576 BKSo

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 01:59 AM

Using 4" SCT under Bortle 4 sky

 

NGC6888   Used both 64D and 40PL + uhc. Faint but easier than NCC6822. Largely averted vision only. Nebulosity between 3 stars. 3/5

 

NGC1491   Best with 40PL+uhc. Easy. Small oval. 3.5/5

NGC7023   Used 40PL. Circular haze around a star. Easy by comparing with stars nearby, which does not have the haze. 2.5/5

 

NGC2024   Used 64D. Surprisingly harder than M45, maybe somewhat easier than NGC6822. First noted the east side of the background of Alnitak was brighter. Then a faint lobe could be detected at the reported location. An uhc filter did not make things easier or harder, or putting Alnitak outside the field because of minor reflection. 2/5

 

NGC891     Used 64D, 40PL, 25GF. A faint bar of light. About as dim as NGC2024 but at least not affect by any nearby bright stars. 2/5

 

 


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#577 Inkswitch

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 10:21 AM

Using 4" SCT under Bortle 4 sky

 

NGC6888   Used both 64D and 40PL + uhc. Faint but easier than NCC6822. Largely averted vision only. Nebulosity between 3 stars. 3/5

 

NGC1491   Best with 40PL+uhc. Easy. Small oval. 3.5/5

NGC7023   Used 40PL. Circular haze around a star. Easy by comparing with stars nearby, which does not have the haze. 2.5/5

 

NGC2024   Used 64D. Surprisingly harder than M45, maybe somewhat easier than NGC6822. First noted the east side of the background of Alnitak was brighter. Then a faint lobe could be detected at the reported location. An uhc filter did not make things easier or harder, or putting Alnitak outside the field because of minor reflection. 2/5

 

NGC891     Used 64D, 40PL, 25GF. A faint bar of light. About as dim as NGC2024 but at least not affect by any nearby bright stars. 2/5

What is the magnification provided by a 64mm eyepiece in your system?



#578 BKSo

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:45 PM

What is the magnification provided by a 64mm eyepiece in your system?


16x, 6.4mm exit pupil, which is my dilated pupil size, and 25 degrees afov.
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#579 ABQJeff

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 09:23 AM

Got up early a couple days ago (Wednesday) to show wife M42 an hour before dawn (she hadn't seen it yet in the new gear). 

 

Since I was up, I was able to get to Ghost of Jupiter (NGC 3242) for the first time (at ~ 15-20 degrees above horizon at ~ 5:45 am).  Really cool, it actually is right about the same size as Jupiter and an eerie blusih grey whispy ball.  Great for October...the Ghost of Jupiter, I give it a 3.

 

That evening I then kept on the theme and did Saturn Nebula (NGC 7009) for the first time, a little higher surface brightness than Ghost of Jupiter, but smaller.  Could make out slight elliptical shape in my 6" Mak.  Saturn Nebula: 3.

 

Wanting to rebaseline/recheck my scoring, I went back to Blue Snowball, which I gave a 2 to before, upping that to 3, since it is brighter than either of those two and looked better at this viewing since closer to Zenith.

 

I then did Dumbbell, M27/NGC 6853, for first time.  Bigger than Owl Nebula, a bit brighter & larger, appeared as a faint grey cloudy oval in my 150mm Mak at 300x and it was getting into the bad side of LP (towards city).   Dumbbell Nebula: Score 3, adjusting for the fact it was in the Bortle 6 side of my LP.

 

All scores unless noted are in Bortle 5 (average) skies.


Edited by ABQJeff, 23 October 2020 - 09:23 AM.

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#580 CrazyPanda

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 10:31 PM

Saw HU 1-2 tonight (also known as PK 86-8.1) - a small bright planetary nebula in Cygnus.

 

Only learned about it because I saw a photo of it, depicting it as the "mini dumbbell nebula".

 

Telescopius lists its surface brightness as at a whopping 10.6 and dimensions of 32" x 20". This puts it surface brightness on par with the Ring Nebula, it's just a lot smaller.

 

The 1st quarter moon was still up and I'm not sure it was even fully dark yet, but this object was high over head at the time I observed it, almost in the zenith hole.

 

Starting off with the 17mm for 115x, it was immediately obvious as a small planetary nebulae of medium brightness. No color to be seen even at the fairly bright exit pupil. This is consistent with my inability to see color in M57, which has a similar surface brightness.

 

At 438x, there was an elongated shape with dimmer patch in the middle, giving it the appearance of a couple of lobes in averted vision. There appeared to be a slight glow around the two brighter lobes, which seemed to be extended nebulosity.

 

At 657x, the lobes were more apparent

 

At 876x, the nebula resembled a kind of skewed hourglass, and the lobes seemed to flicker in and out of bad seeing, sometimes taking on an almost stellar appearance at times.

 

This would be a great object in a bigger scope under steadier skies.

 

2/5


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#581 ABQJeff

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 09:11 PM

Went to a different local Bortle 3 sight, light dome of ABQ still interfered up to around 30 degrees into sky.  However, saw the Western Veil (NGC 6960) and Eastern Veil (6995) nebulas for the first time in ED80 with OIII filters.  Eastern Veil had a higher surface brightness and was easier to spot.  I could not quite get both into view in 1.25" 40mm/43 deg (2.9 deg TFOV).  Impressive, but I like North America more (perhaps unfailrly because Veil doesn't match a shape). 

 

I could not see middle part (ie NGC 6974) of the Veil nebula with OIII, UHC or no filter.  I am looking forward to trying it again at a darker local site, and eventually with a 120ST and 2" ES 30mmx82 deg EP with OIII filter (if Santa is good to me lol.gif).

 

Eastern and Western Veil (Bortle 3 site): 4 out of 5.


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#582 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 11:23 PM

I observed the open cluster Trumpler 2 in Perseus for the first time with Canon IS 15x50s on Friday night.  As far as I can recall, I've never observed it with a telescope either.

I give it a rating of 2.5/5 as a binocular target.

https://en.wikipedia...le:Tr_2_map.png

https://en.wikipedia...a/File:Tr_2.png

https://webda.physic...gi?dirname=tr02


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#583 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 25 October 2020 - 11:55 PM

Here's some information on Trumpler 2 (Collinder 29): RA 2h36m53s, Dec +55°54.9', V-mag 5.9, Size 17.0', Distance 2000 light years  

 

The spectral type K3.5II-IIIr star HD 16068 is the cluster's brightest star.



#584 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 26 October 2020 - 10:59 AM

Here's a screen shot (click to enlarge) from the freeware TUBA program.  Trumpler 2 (Tr 2) lies at the center, about two thirds of the way up from the bottom of the image.

 

http://philharrington.net/tuba.htm

Attached Thumbnails

  • Trumpler 2 TUBA Processed Cropped Resized CN.jpg

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