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What DSO did you just observe for the first time? Rate it 1 to 5.

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#51 theApex

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 09:24 AM

I've never heard of the Argo Navis thingy until now and had to look it up. ****, that thing is quite pricey!


Edited by theApex, 08 November 2018 - 09:24 AM.


#52 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:43 PM

Here's the Vorontsov-Velyaminov planetary nebula classification scheme:
 

1) Stellar Image
2) Smooth disk (a, brighter toward center; b, uniform brightness; c, traces of a ring structure)
3) Irregular disk (a, very irregular brightness distribution; b, traces of ring structure)
4) Ring structure
5) Irregular form, similar to a diffuse nebula
6) Anomalous form

 

http://www.messier.s...g/planetar.html
 

There's more at http://www.jscas.net...ssification.pdf

 

Dave Mitsky


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#53 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 12:57 PM

I've never heard of the Argo Navis thingy until now and had to look it up. ****, that thing is quite pricey!

Most of the hard-core observers that I know who own big Dobs have switched to the Nexus DSC device.

 

http://delastro.org/...dsc-mini-review

 

Dave Mitsky


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#54 KidOrion

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 04:00 PM

Last night, in rapidly-deteriorating conditions: NGC 7354, a brightish PN in Cepheus. (It's on the AL's Herschel II list.) Quite bright and medium-sized. Haven't transcribed my notes yet, but I'd give it a 3/5. Found without a filter with a 12.5" scope + 14mm 82˚ eyepiece. My O-III promptly got stuck in the eyepiece and I nearly had to remove it with pliers.


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#55 theApex

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Posted 08 November 2018 - 04:44 PM

Here's the Vorontsov-Velyaminov planetary nebula classification scheme:
 

1) Stellar Image
2) Smooth disk (a, brighter toward center; b, uniform brightness; c, traces of a ring structure)
3) Irregular disk (a, very irregular brightness distribution; b, traces of ring structure)
4) Ring structure
5) Irregular form, similar to a diffuse nebula
6) Anomalous form

 

http://www.messier.s...g/planetar.html
 

There's more at http://www.jscas.net...ssification.pdf

 

Dave Mitsky

Thanks. I was about to look it up somewhere.

 

Most of the hard-core observers that I know who own big Dobs have switched to the Nexus DSC device.

 

http://delastro.org/...dsc-mini-review

 

Dave Mitsky

Thanks. Someday when I have a big Dob then, who knows. undecided.gif



#56 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 03:34 AM

Before closing the French Dome for the morning, I observed an open cluster that I hadn't seen previously, namely Collinder 106 in Monoceros.  According to the NSOG, Collinder 106 spans 45 arc minutes and shines at magnitude +4.6.  It was too large to see in its entirety using the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain so I had to slew back and forth a bit.  I used magnifications of 116 and 162x.  As mentioned in the NSOG, five bright (7th magnitude or so) stars within the cluster form an X.

I also viewed Collinder 106 with the 5" f/5 refractor that serves as the classical Cassegrain's finder scope at 32x. 

 

https://www.univie.a...i?dirname=cr106

 

https://celest1alsph.../collinder-106/

 

The NSOG gives Collinder 106 a 3 star rating and I tend to agree.

 

Dave Mitsky


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#57 jerobe

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 06:09 PM

Last week I was finally to observe the galaxy NGC 253.  I was at the Eldorado Star Party which has very dark southern skies and 253 just jumped out at me in my 10x50 binos and my 6 inch Mak Newt. Very impressive, unexpectedly so. I'd rate it a 4 or 5 on this scale. 



#58 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 08:17 PM

Got out last night with the Takahashi e180 starting at 2am, temps in the low 20's. I lasted until about 4:30. If you think Siri's Speech-to-Text is sketchy in normal conditions, you should try it when the iPad is nearly frozen! Took me an hour today to go back and fix all the gaffs in my notes.

 

The session was mostly large and faint Sharpless nebula in Perseus, Taurus, Auriga, and Orion. But I did get a few Eye Candy objects in to make it all worthwhile.

 

The best first-time object object was IC 405 in Auriga, which I scored as a 4. From my observing notes:

 

"Nov 12, 2018, Epsilon, Home: Even better than IC 417. Tried 12 and 7nm filters, 7 was best in the Epsilon. Large irregular nebula with a hole in the center somewhat like a rough Rosette. Many stars scattered across the nebula, cluster NGC 1893. The H-alpha filter took it’s toll on the cluster, perhaps 18 stars visible. Need to come back to that later unfiltered."


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#59 Mike Wiles

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 12:11 AM

I logged an observation of NGC 7510 from the dark skies of Portal, Arizona on November 7th.  I rate it a 4 - a very interesting looking open cluster.  Here's my notes with the 20" f/3 Newtonian.

 

17mm, 103x - Small, very condensed cluster.  Stars seem arranged almost like a brick wall, stacked in three neat rows running from east to west.  About fifteen stars of 10th and 11th magnitude. 

 

6mm, 292x - Increasing the power doesn't bring out any more stars, but it does enhance and emphasize the pyramid shaped structure to the cluster.  This is a very nice little treat of a cluster.

 

Mike



#60 havasman

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 04:11 PM

I got another dark site session in last Friday night and was able to observe the faint H-II region just west of the core of NGC925 in the faint arm that extends from the ESE end of the bar south and to the west. I had not attempted that observation before. The H-II region was surprisingly prominent on a good night that, while not very dark (SQM-L 20.95), was transparent with relatively still uppers. 262x and 1.5mm exit pupil was effective.

 

Later using very high magnification, 1200x, I saw detail in IC418 that hinted at the outer parts the "Spirograph" loops and squiggles in the Hubble image. That was a huge surprise. Those appeared @ 1/3 of the time via averted vision only.

 

Both are recommended for medium-large apertures at good sites. Numbers? Pick 'em.


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#61 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 06:16 PM

Last night's catch. All "virgin territory" for me.

 

"Z16" is my 16" f/7 Zambuto Dob. I was using a 27mm white phosphor NV (night vision) eyepiece, various configurations from f/3.5 to f/10.5. It was too cold to do a lot of note talking, just what Siri could understand:

 

  • NGC 2112, OC, Orion, Score 4 - Very nice rich in loose cluster perhaps 60+ stars parked on the east edge of Barnards Loop.

 

  • Sharpless 2-254, BN, Orion, Score 4 - Nov 13, 2018, Z16, Home: Very nice! Appears as three patches in a row first being large, lower surface brightness, diffuse. The next one being high surface brightness and small almost touching the large patch. The third one in the line is a little bit larger than the second one, also high surface brightness. Much more impressive than the M78/NGC 2071 combo field! 

 

  • Sharpless 2-261, BN, Orion, Score 4 - Lower's Nebula - Very nice! Large and fills the field with the 55 afocal. This would be a nice one for the (Takahashi) Epsilon. Appears to have a doughnut shape with one side being very bright and the other side just bright five or six stars in central hole.

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#62 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 November 2018 - 03:45 PM

This morning I observed a deep-sky object for the "first" time in at least two respects.  NGC 2261 (Hubble's Variable Nebula), a reflection nebula in Monoceros, is one of my favorite winter DSOs and I've seen it hundreds of times over the years.  However, this was the first time that I ever viewed it from my red-zone front yard and the first time that I saw it through my first goto telescope and my first SCT, a 6" f/10 Celestron NexStar Evolution.  My wife and I purchased the Evolution so she could observe objects on her own.  I'd been trying to convince her for some time that she would enjoy having a small goto scope and with the Black Friday sale we finally agreed to purchase one.

 

The Evolution arrived yesterday afternoon.  I assembled the scope and charged the on-board lithium battery.  The forecasts called for clearing skies late last night but after perusing the satellite images I was doubtful.  However, the new telescope curse was a rather short one, since I took a look outside before retiring for the night and the skies had cleared.  

 

After dressing for the cold and windy conditions, I set up the Evolution and, using the two star calibration method, I began observing with the supplied 40mm Celestron Plossl (38x) and my 8-24mm Baader Planetarium Hyperion Mark III zoom eyepiece (63 to 188x).  M42, of course, was my first target.  I followed that with a number of Messier and NGC objects, one of them being NGC 2264 (the Christmas Tree Cluster) in Monoceros.  NGC 2261 was nearby so I decided to give it a shot.  I really hadn't expected to see it with the local light pollution and a bright, 60%-illuminated Moon but sure enough it was there.  Using the zoom eyepiece, I found an appropriate magnification and spent a few minutes beholding the small and faint wisp of light.

https://observing.sk...n/NGC_2261.html

NGC 2261 was the first object to be photographed with the 200" Hale Telescope on the night of its first light.

https://www.edn.com/...tItemId=4438477

Before I finally gave into the cold and encroaching clouds, I had logged two dozen celestial objects, finishing the session with the Moon at 38x.  First light for this telescope was a chilly but memorable one.

I rate NGC 2261 as a 4 out of 5 object from a dark site through a large aperture but only a 1.5 out of 5 as I saw it this morning.

Dave Mitsky

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#63 azure1961p

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Posted 02 December 2018 - 08:45 AM

1956: 60mm refractor, no finder, no adult help: M42. It was the only one I could find and I would rate it +5 just because I could find it.  smile.gif

Ed

 

Mine was 20 years later nearly with a 40mm refractor and M42.  At this point I only knew from color photos and so on what nebula were with zero idea how this might translate at the eyepiece in this little scope.  I looked in the area and saw stars only.  After a time I noticed a peculiar haze in the field. Altitude was a bit low, light pollution etc. . But what the heck was that non-starlikehazy thing that disappeared altogether at times?  I hung with it... I knew something strange was in view I just couldn't bring it home and call it. Little by little it filtered into my head, "ahhh can this be what it really looks like through a small scope?".  An hour later I was inside my Dads studio on the thick pile blue carpet that covered the floor with a Time-Life book on the universe. M42&43 had this rich two page spread in all its red, white and some blue glory.  I knew that was it.  I only had a piece of it for all my backyard efforts but a piece was golden and it ushers in so many more mystical glowing beauties.

 

Pete


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#64 Foundationer

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 08:48 PM

NGC7662

The Blue Snowball

Had never seen it before this fall. I love the planetaries and I really enjoyed this one!

I give it a 5 and I'll be back!



#65 KidOrion

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Posted 08 December 2018 - 11:24 PM

The most noteworthy of the Herschels I observed this last week was NGC 1664, a quite-rich open cluster that resembles a heart-shaped balloon with a long string. A 4 for certain, on a night when collimation stayed spot-on and the brightest star in the cluster had a lovely set of spikes radiating from it.


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#66 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 03:35 PM

I was at a dark site on Tuesday night and observed the large open clusters Collinder 33 and Collinder 34 in Cassiopeia for the first time using my 10" Sky-Watcher Collapsible Dob.  Collinder 32, 33, and 34 are all part of the same complex, namely IC 1848.

https://www.constell...om/soul-nebula/

 

Collinder 33 02h 59m 18.0s +60º 24' 00" magnitude 5.9 100 stars 39 arc minutes
Collinder 34 03h 00m 54.0s +60º 25' 00" magnitude 6.8   60 stars 25 arc minutes

My rating is 2.5.

 

Dave Mitsky


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#67 Jeff Morgan

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Posted 10 December 2018 - 11:35 PM

December is a difficult observing month, but I did get out last week to work Camelopardalis with the 16" f/7 Zambuto. Pretty thin soup, but here are a few:

 

NGC 1502, Open Cluster

Nice in the 27 Panoptic (score 3), very nice in the Mod 3 (score 4). Bright not overly rich a nice stand-out for the area.

 

NGC 2403, Spiral Galaxy

Much better in the Mod 3 then the Panoptic (score 4 and 3 respectively), worth coming back to.

 

IC 342, Spiral Galaxy

Here is one I scored poorly (2 both conventionally and NV). The reason I include it is that is has a photo in SkySafari Description and an image on the chart. Usually, this is a tip-off for eye-candy.

 

Visually, I felt like I was looking right through it! Firstly, it is a face-on spiral and the NV eyepiece does not always do well on these. Secondly, I was observing from home (Bortle 5 or 6 sky) and my conventional eyepieces were hobbled by the light pollution. But it does have the imagery in SkySafari, so I will suggest it for you guys with darker skies and/or larger apertures. I have earmarked this one for a return visit on my next dark sky expedition. Given it's northerly declination, it should be accessible much of the year.

 

 

 


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#68 Augustus

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 04:09 PM

I saw NGC 288 last night. It was quite dim due to the high humidity, light pollution south of me (New York City mostly), and low altitude (about 20 degrees), but you could still just barely see it and resolve it into stars. Reminds me of NGC 2419.

 

I would rate it 3/5. 


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#69 havasman

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Posted 13 December 2018 - 02:28 AM

Monday night I observed PGC10139 (NGC1023A) and I'm pretty sure I've never seen it before. My notes for NGC1023 are "brt, lg, V brt core, extended halo, 2 *'s W of core V faint, 1 * E of core, faint curved extend S of E star" and when I went to the next item on the list it was PGC10139 and saw that it was N1023A described as a faint ghostly blob on S side of E end of the larger Gx. Observed at 446x with the Starmaster. It's not that difficult but the surprise was fun.

Both are part of Lyon Gx Group 70 (LGG70) along with NGC1003, IC239 (both observed) and PGC9759 (not seen).

 

Also seen for the 1st time were comets 46P/Wirtanen, naked eye end easily seen as very large and bright at 52x in the widest field (78 arc'), and 64P/Swift-Gehrels in Triangulum, ~brt and not small - easily seen also in a wide 57 arc' field. They were pretty cool. Each time I see a comet I recall how important they were to the ancient astronomers and how they are incidental to many of us now.


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#70 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 11:17 PM

ASH held a member star party at the Naylor Observatory last night.  I observed quite a few celestial objects over several hours, including one that I hadn't seen previously, namely Collinder 89.  I used the club's 12.5" Cave Astrola equatorial Newtonian at 59 and 83x.

Cr 89 is a rather poor open cluster located near M35. It contains a mix of a few rather bright stars and a number of faint ones.  I'll give it a rating of 2.5.

 

There's some information on Collinder 89 at https://www.univie.a...i?dirname=cr089 and

https://in-the-sky.o...0Aw8UVSskjJYQ00

 

Dave Mitsky



#71 Rogbo

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 11:39 PM

The double cluster in Perseus!

 

I got to give it a 5. I observe from the San Francisco Bay Area in bortle 8 by my weather app plus three porch lights and a street lamp. I may have even seen them, the double clusters before but because of the light pollution they never jumped out at me. 

 

But this time I had my new to me second hand 10 inch Dob and my ES 28mm 68° eyepiece and the chief culprit porch light was off. I'd been out for a while watching Orion climb over the eastern foothills.

 

And then I turned the rig north to bring the tube upright for storage and there it was like two piles of diamonds. It took me an hour and three looks with every eyepiece to call it a night. 


Edited by Rogbo, 07 January 2019 - 11:45 AM.

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#72 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 02:16 AM

My new DSOs for Sunday night were the sparse winter star clusters NGC 2396 in Puppis, Melotte 71 in Puppis, and Collinder 97 in Monoceros.  I used the Naylor Observatory's 12.5" Cave Astrola Newtonian at magnifications of 53 and 147x to observe these lackluster open clusters.  None of them were anything to write home about.

 

Melotte 71 lies just north of NGC 2244.  It was my favorite of the three clusters.  I'll bestow upon it a rating of 2.5 and the others a 2.

 

https://in-the-sky.o....php?id=NGC2396 -  NGC 2396

 

https://www.univie.a...dirname=ngc2396

 

https://www.univie.a...?dirname=mel071 - Melotte 71

 

https://rogerivester...llenge-object/ 

 

https://in-the-sky.o...id=Collinder_97 - Collinder 97

https://www.univie.a...i?dirname=cr097

 

Dave Mitsky

 



#73 Asbytec

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 03:28 AM

NGC 936. Rating: wow!
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#74 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 07 January 2019 - 02:09 PM

NGC 936 is certainly not a run-of-the-mill galaxy.

 

https://www.constell...alaxy-ngc-936/ 

 

https://in-the-sky.o....php?id=NGC936 


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#75 Asbytec

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Posted 08 January 2019 - 04:40 AM

I enjoyed NGC 936 for its appearance and potential. It has a faint outer halo, a brighter core, and a faint stellar nucleaus. Despite being a lenticular, it also presents many signatures of a face on spiral. Lot to see.


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