Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What DSO did you just observe for the first time? Rate it 1 to 5.

  • Please log in to reply
491 replies to this topic

#76 Chiron0224

Chiron0224

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 153
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Jacksonville, Florida

Posted 08 January 2019 - 06:51 PM

The double cluster in Perseus!

 

I got to give it a 5. I observe from the San Francisco Bay Area in bortle 8 by my weather app plus three porch lights and a street lamp. I may have even seen them, the double clusters before but because of the light pollution they never jumped out at me. 

 

But this time I had my new to me second hand 10 inch Dob and my ES 28mm 68° eyepiece and the chief culprit porch light was off. I'd been out for a while watching Orion climb over the eastern foothills.

 

And then I turned the rig north to bring the tube upright for storage and there it was like two piles of diamonds. It took me an hour and three looks with every eyepiece to call it a night. 

Double cluster is always fantastic.  Get yourself out to a really dark sight where it becomes a naked eye smudge between Cass and Perseus and then take a look.  It is breathtaking.  No matter what my observing goals are, if it's up, I always pay it a visit.

 

 

Mine was 20 years later nearly with a 40mm refractor and M42.  At this point I only knew from color photos and so on what nebula were with zero idea how this might translate at the eyepiece in this little scope.  I looked in the area and saw stars only.  After a time I noticed a peculiar haze in the field. Altitude was a bit low, light pollution etc. . But what the heck was that non-starlikehazy thing that disappeared altogether at times?  I hung with it... I knew something strange was in view I just couldn't bring it home and call it. Little by little it filtered into my head, "ahhh can this be what it really looks like through a small scope?".  An hour later I was inside my Dads studio on the thick pile blue carpet that covered the floor with a Time-Life book on the universe. M42&43 had this rich two page spread in all its red, white and some blue glory.  I knew that was it.  I only had a piece of it for all my backyard efforts but a piece was golden and it ushers in so many more mystical glowing beauties.

 

Pete

I love this story.  This is why we get addicted.  And like the last one, this is one of my "old friends" that I always visit when it's up.



#77 Tom Axelsen

Tom Axelsen

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 49
  • Joined: 13 Sep 2013
  • Loc: Møn, Denmark

Posted 09 January 2019 - 10:50 AM

Last time I was out was the night 5-6. January, besides reobserving some previus 'firsts' the two first of the night was Andromeda's Parachute and Sirius B - The Pup.

 

In the 20" f/5 dob, Andromeda's Parachute was easily seen as an elongated star at an magnification of 363x. In rare moments of steady seeing two stellar points (A & B) was seen in the fuzzy elongated star at 498x.

At the moment of seeing it, I would rate it 3. Afterward when I started to think about what I had seen and the distances and light travel times involved the rating grow to 5 smile.gif

 

At 212x the Pup was easy in the 20", snug up to the white blue arcligth of Sirius A. Rating 4.5.


Edited by Tom Axelsen, 09 January 2019 - 10:52 AM.

  • havasman likes this

#78 bella luna

bella luna

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 378
  • Joined: 21 Jan 2018
  • Loc: Covina ca

Posted 22 January 2019 - 04:22 PM

My first DSO that I observed was M42 ( Orion Nebula) about a 1 1/2 yrs. ago using my Celestron C90. with my Celestron 8-24zoom .

          I was awed. had to call my wife outside to come see it also.                    rated 4


Edited by bella luna, 22 January 2019 - 04:33 PM.


#79 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 952
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 28 January 2019 - 03:58 PM

Latest first time DSO and ratings:

 

NGC 1049, in my 14” dob it was just a fuzzy patch but at 165x definitive id on this extra-galactic globular cluster.  It is part of the Fornax Dwarf.  Visually only a 2/5, but conceptually the fact it’s out of our galaxy and 400,000 ly away is 5/5 so overall score 3.5/5

 

NGC 1291 again best view at about 165x in 14” fuzzy central bar easily visible I thought I caught glimpses of spiral arms. At 209x 3 faint points visible in the fuzzy bar with averted vision.  Assuming they are foreground stars. 4/5 at time of viewing but upgraded to 5/5 on post observing research when I realised it is a ring galaxy and the idea that I might have glimpsed the ring just blew my mind.  I had not looked this object up beforehand just knew it was galaxy.  

 

Flame Nebula: first of all, having observed the horse head many times before how have I missed this in the past?  I mean it’s so obvious!  3/5

 

NGC 1999 small obscure reflection nebula in Orion. At 165x and up you can clearly see the dark area as T shaped. Pretty cool. 3/5


  • Cron likes this

#80 ssagerian

ssagerian

    Maker Uranographer

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 443
  • Joined: 30 Nov 2013

Posted 28 January 2019 - 05:13 PM

I was 15? Same night as I first saw Saturn ..M57! took me an hour to discern it and to appreciate what I was looking at.  That was with my 60mm Tasco refractor, alt-az mount,  wooden tripod, cheap metal eyepiece tray. I quickly made plans to grind my first 6" mirror...


  • CAAD9 and flygary like this

#81 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,097
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 29 January 2019 - 01:12 AM

While using the 20" to examine a Herschel galaxy in Cancer (NGC 2512, 13.2 mag, vague barred spiral structure deduced, rate it 3/5) I came across an interesting tight pair of near edge on galaxies that I rate as 4/5 together:

  • NGC 2480--dimmer and smaller of pair, average surface brightness, elongated approximately 2:1 or greater, vv faint stellar core, 13.8 mag. 
  • NGC 2481--brighter of the two, high surface brightness, bright stellar core, elongated ~N/S approximately 3 or 4:1, 13.0 mag.

The major axis of 2480 points generally toward the lower center of 2481.  There is a 17th mag star equidistant between the two furthest ends of the galaxies, and two ~17 mag stars close to 2481's center. 


Edited by Redbetter, 29 January 2019 - 02:37 PM.

  • CAAD9 likes this

#82 AndrewM1

AndrewM1

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 12 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Cape Cod, MA

Posted 07 February 2019 - 09:35 PM

With a nod of gratitude to Havasman for his recent posting on this object, observed NGC 2403 for the first time a few nights ago.  Even in a small 4.5 reflector, Bortle 5 site, it immediately jumped out and generated a sense of awe often lacking in observing galaxies in small scopes.  Very bright, approximately twice as long as wide, beautifully framed by a couple of stars.  Sounds ridiculous, but I still smile a few days later when thinking about this one -- very special, rate it 3.5 of 5.


  • havasman likes this

#83 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,103
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 08 February 2019 - 05:47 AM

I observed NGC 2346, Planetary in Monoceros last night. Fairly large, faint, but beautiful. Little difficult to observe, but at high magnification with UCH is shows some detail. Detail in Sketching forum. 



#84 Augustus

Augustus

    Fly Me To The Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 9,504
  • Joined: 26 Dec 2015
  • Loc: Stamford, Connecticut

Posted 08 February 2019 - 09:22 PM

NGC 1535, planetary in Eridanus. 3/5, not dim but not very interesting.

 

NGC 1788, reflection nebula in Orion. 3.5/5, not bright but fascinating nonetheless.


  • CAAD9 likes this

#85 AndrewM1

AndrewM1

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 12 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Cape Cod, MA

Posted 08 February 2019 - 10:34 PM

Have to add this one.  Canis Major is finally getting over my tree line and observed NGC 2362 tonight for the first time.  What a treasure -- a tightly packed collection of diamonds with a central beacon that is very easy to find if your latitude permits.  I'd rate it a minimum of 3.5 with a Bortle 5 sky.  


  • CAAD9 likes this

#86 jcj380

jcj380

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,805
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: 42N 88W

Posted 13 February 2019 - 11:44 AM

M93 open cluster.  Since I was observing from inside (-50 F windchill or so) and it was low in the LP soup, it was not impressive.  Have to check this under better conditions and my dark site if possible.



#87 Akol47

Akol47

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 78
  • Joined: 17 Jan 2019
  • Loc: Tulsa, Oklahoma

Posted 17 February 2019 - 11:39 PM

M41, fumbled around long enough and actually found it a few nights ago, I'd rate it 4 very good. I'm pretty easy to please though.


  • CAAD9 likes this

#88 jcj380

jcj380

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,805
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: 42N 88W

Posted 04 March 2019 - 11:33 AM

"Ghost of Jupiter" planetary.  I didn't use enough magnification to see structure but the green color was very pronounced.  Responded well to a Lumicon filter.

 

3.5


Edited by jcj380, 04 March 2019 - 11:34 AM.


#89 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 17,103
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: Pampanga, PI

Posted 07 March 2019 - 06:26 PM

IC 2233. I'd rate it a 1 in terms of being able to observe it, and a 5 in terms of difficulty. It was the difficulty that made it interesting to see...if it could be seen. 



#90 jcj380

jcj380

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,805
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: 42N 88W

Posted 11 March 2019 - 07:30 AM

NGC 2232 - open cluster in Mon. last night.

 

This is a nice little cluster, relatively bright with a moderate number of stars visible in my 120mm .

 

Striking in that it has an asterism that reminds me of the constellation Andromeda.  I'll revisit it tonight if the weather clears as predicted.

 

4.0



#91 rowdy388

rowdy388

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,834
  • Joined: 09 Apr 2013
  • Loc: Saratoga County, NY

Posted 11 March 2019 - 11:59 AM

NGC's 3681, 3684, and 3686 are a trio of galaxies in Leo's hind quarters all visible in the same 

wide field eyepiece. I was never able to make them out before and was surprised when they easily

seemed to pop out at me last week. I actually saw the dimmest galaxy first (3681), then the next 

brightest in the middle. Finally I noticed what I first though was a bright reflection from somewhere at

the edge of the field. Turned out to be the brightest of the three galaxies, 3686! I'm still a little excited 

to have seen them all in the same field so easily after never seeing them before. 3.5 out of 5



#92 Cron

Cron

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 15 Aug 2018

Posted 11 March 2019 - 12:24 PM

M64, and I give it a 4. Even under my suburban/urban transition skies, my 10" scope pulled a pretty good view of this one. As I'd seen many photos of the galaxy, it was obvious what I was looking at. The "black eye" was cool too.



#93 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,247
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 12 March 2019 - 03:24 PM

I observed the 25 Orionis open cluster (Briceño 1) for the first time last night through a 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Astrola Newtonian at 59 and 147x at the orange-zone Naylor Observatory.  This young star cluster appeared to be rather sparse but Orion was on the downswing at the time.  I rate it 2 out of 5 but Briceño 1 might be a better target under darker skies when it is near culmination.  I also saw the cluster through 15x70s.

 

https://upload.wikim...n_Subgrupos.jpg

 

The 25 Orionis group is part of the Orion OB1a subassociation.

 

https://iopscience.i.../10.1086/513087

 

Dave Mitsky



#94 AxelB

AxelB

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,418
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2015

Posted 12 March 2019 - 05:13 PM

I just found this nice thread do here’s my latest discovery.

From my red zone suburb backyard, I was using my 5" f6.5 achromatic refractor with a 32mm plossl (compared both the Televue and Celestron Omni). Usually I dont use large exit pupil from home but I needed a challenge to compare the two 32mm plossls. I used a large towel over my head to shield my eyes from local light sources and waited at least 15 minutes for my eyes to adjust.

My target was the Cone nebula in Monoceros or shall I say the nebulosity around the Christmas tree cluster ngc2264. I had seen the cluster but never had a chance to observe the nebulosity (access to dark skies for visual observation is difficult in Canadian winter). I put on my new Lumicon gen3 Oiii filter and there it was, obviously seen with indirect vision, the beautiful triangular Christmas tree cluster surrounded by angelic nebulosity! Wow! It was also visible with the Lumicon uhc. I’m a bit surprised by the result with Oiii because I taught this was an hydrogen nebula.

From a darker sky and using my C8 at f6.3, I could probably observe it with just an uhc or even the wider uhc-s and get a better vue of the star cluster with the nebula and it would rate higher but for now I’ll give it a 4/5.

The cluster is cool on its own but with the nebula, it’s much better.

Edit: no I didn’t see the dark cone itself. That would certainly require a darker sky.
I’m still puzzled about seeing the nebulosity with Oiii filter. Could it be the blueish glow from the reflexion nebula part of this complex? That would be the part named Fox fur nebula?

Edited by AxelB, 12 March 2019 - 06:58 PM.


#95 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,706
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 12 March 2019 - 05:37 PM

Went exploring through glob-city in Ophiuchus and Serpens this morning.  Observed all of these for the first time (ratings attached):

 

M5-5

M10-3

M12-4

M14-2

M9-2

M19-3

 

The 2's are probably unfair as the transparency was just ok.  I'll go back later for a longer look under better conditions.

 

When I was observing through my 4.5" dob, I used to think all globs looked the same (because they pretty much do in that aperture).  I love how the 10" allows their unique personalities to shine through.



#96 Inkswitch

Inkswitch

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 360
  • Joined: 09 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Walhonding, OH USA

Posted 12 March 2019 - 07:35 PM

Last night I viewed P205.1+14.2, aka Medusa Nebula, a planetary in Gemini for the first time.  I would rate it a 1.  I suspected I could see it without filtration at 48X in the 12.5" reflector.  I put in a UHC and confirmed.  OIII did not improve the view, in fact I felt it degraded the view.  UHC was best.  Low surface brightness but large for a planetary.



#97 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,247
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 12 March 2019 - 11:52 PM

I observed the 25 Orionis cluster (Briceño 1) again earlier tonight through the Naylor Observatory's 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Astrola Newtonian at 59, 69, and 83x.  The sky was more transparent tonight and, despite the brighter and closer waxing crescent Moon, I could see more faint stars in the area around 25 Orionis this time. 



#98 jcj380

jcj380

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,805
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2014
  • Loc: 42N 88W

Posted 18 March 2019 - 07:57 AM

IC 4756 open cluster in Serpens.

 

Some descriptions call it rather sparse, but it's a relatively bright little cluster of about 12-15 stars in an arc.  Nearby is brighter HR 7008 (mag 6.4).  The cluster and 7008 remind me of a parachute or maybe an umbrella.

 

Definitely want to check this one out under a darker sky.

 

4.7



#99 Inkswitch

Inkswitch

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 360
  • Joined: 09 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Walhonding, OH USA

Posted 18 March 2019 - 08:19 AM

Last night I viewed NGC2169 for the first time. I was in a yellow zone with the 150mm reflector. I used 48X and 92X. This open cluster in Orion is also known as the “37” cluster. It has been on my list for some time but I never got around to it. It is bright and obvious, I found the top horizontal of the “7” to be slightly difficult, averted. I rate this object a 4, it is remarkable and would be a good crowd pleaser at outreach events.
  • Jeff Morgan and theApex like this

#100 Jeff Morgan

Jeff Morgan

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,020
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2003
  • Loc: Prescott, AZ

Posted 19 March 2019 - 12:04 AM

Last night I viewed NGC2169 for the first time. I was in a yellow zone with the 150mm reflector. I used 48X and 92X. This open cluster in Orion is also known as the “37” cluster. It has been on my list for some time but I never got around to it. It is bright and obvious, I found the top horizontal of the “7” to be slightly difficult, averted. I rate this object a 4, it is remarkable and would be a good crowd pleaser at outreach events.

The "37" is a fun one. It really does look like a 37!

 

While you are in the area, check out NGC 1662, sometimes called the Klingon Battle Cruiser cluster.

 

And if the Star Trek theme appeals to you, NGC 6357 (Scorpius) looks even more like one, seen from above.


  • theApex likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics