Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What DSO did you just observe for the first time? Rate it 1 to 5.

  • Please log in to reply
512 replies to this topic

#126 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,220
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 11 May 2019 - 05:19 PM

Eskimo Nebula or C39

C29 Irregular Galaxy 4.5/5

Eskimo Nebula is normally cataloged as NGC2392 and HyperLeda lists no C catalog number as an alternate for NGC2392. You have 2 disparate objects referenced with the C catalog designation. What catalog is that, please?


  • Procyon likes this

#127 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 11 May 2019 - 05:38 PM

Eskimo Nebula is normally cataloged as NGC2392 and HyperLeda lists no C catalog number as an alternate for NGC2392. You have 2 disparate objects referenced with the C catalog designation. What catalog is that, please?

The Caldwell catalogue. crazy.gif



#128 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 11 May 2019 - 05:45 PM

Eskimo Nebula is normally cataloged as NGC2392 and HyperLeda lists no C catalog number as an alternate for NGC2392. You have 2 disparate objects referenced with the C catalog designation. What catalog is that, please?

The Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392), also known as the Clownface Nebula or Caldwell 39, is a bipolar double-shell planetary nebula (PN). It was discovered by astronomer William Herschel in 1787. The formation resembles a person's head surrounded by a parka hood. It is surrounded by gas that composed the outer layers of a Sun-like star. The visible inner filaments are ejected by a strong wind of particles from the central star. The outer disk contains unusual, light-year-long filaments.

 

NGC 2392 lies more than 2,870 light-years away, and is visible with a small telescope in the constellation of Gemini.

 

Great call, you're eagle eyed smile.gif, also a typo with C21, or Caldwell 21 (NGC 4449), edited, thanks, but C29 or Caldwell 29 (NGC 5005) is a nice inclined spiral Galaxy to observe also.


Edited by Procyon, 11 May 2019 - 06:50 PM.


#129 havasman

havasman

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,220
  • Joined: 04 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Dallas, Texas

Posted 11 May 2019 - 05:48 PM

The Caldwell catalogue. crazy.gif

Interesting catalog  -  http://astropixels.c...aldwellcat.html  Odd that HyperLeda does not include it in their lists of alternate designations for either NGC2392 or NGC5005.

 

The more common NGC/IC designations are better used when available, IMO.


Edited by havasman, 11 May 2019 - 05:49 PM.

  • Dave Mitsky, Inkswitch and Procyon like this

#130 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 11 May 2019 - 05:59 PM

Interesting catalog  -  http://astropixels.c...aldwellcat.html  Odd that HyperLeda does not include it in their lists of alternate designations for either NGC2392 or NGC5005.

 

The more common NGC/IC designations are better used when available, IMO.

Using the Celestron HC, one can get used to Messier, NGC, IC, C, Abell name terms. I call it as whatever software I'm using that night calls it lol. Stellarium has some unique names also, but yea, better to call it NGC in the end.



#131 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,950
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 11 May 2019 - 06:39 PM

The Caldwell catalogue. crazy.gif

As has been discussed on Cloudy Nights a number of times before, the Caldwell "catalogue" is merely an observing list, not a true astronomical catalog.


  • Procyon likes this

#132 dave253

dave253

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 08 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 26 May 2019 - 02:13 AM

The galaxy pair NGC 3511&3513. 5/5


  • Procyon likes this

#133 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,765
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 26 May 2019 - 10:25 AM

Last night was a faint fuzzy night:

 

NGC 5838 -- 3

NGC 5846 -- 3

NGC 4494 -- 3

NGC 4565 -- 4

 

I think I may have inadvertently stumbled across NGC 4725 as well, but I'm not sure so I'll forgo the rating. grin.gif 


  • havasman likes this

#134 russell23

russell23

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,039
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 04 June 2019 - 02:45 PM

Ok now - not the first time ever - but first time in a very long time and first time with my SW120ED

 

Object:NGC 6207

Magnitude: 11.7

Eyepiece: 18.2mm DeLite (50x)

 

So I don't usually even think to look for NGC 6207 and I had not looked for it that I can recall with my 120ED.   But I was not looking for it last night either.  I was swapping eyepieces and did not have the azimuth locked and the OTA moved slightly and there was the faint glow of NGC 6207.  Sky transparency was outstanding last night so the galaxy really popped in the 120ED. 

 

For some reason it just made me really happy to see it.  I probably should put more effort into locating some of the fainter galaxies that are in range for my 120ED.


  • Inkswitch, KidOrion and Procyon like this

#135 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 04 June 2019 - 04:08 PM

Ok now - not the first time ever - but first time in a very long time and first time with my SW120ED

 

Object:NGC 6207

Magnitude: 11.7

Eyepiece: 18.2mm DeLite (50x)

 

So I don't usually even think to look for NGC 6207 and I had not looked for it that I can recall with my 120ED.   But I was not looking for it last night either.  I was swapping eyepieces and did not have the azimuth locked and the OTA moved slightly and there was the faint glow of NGC 6207.  Sky transparency was outstanding last night so the galaxy really popped in the 120ED. 

 

For some reason it just made me really happy to see it.  I probably should put more effort into locating some of the fainter galaxies that are in range for my 120ED.

Heh, funny coincidence. Saw NGC 6207 next to M13 for the first time yesterday with an eyepiece giving me a 2mm Exit Pupil and 140x magnification. Could not see it with A 1.7 or 2.5mm exit pupil. Very faint, especially from a red zone. Still nice.

 

Russell, you're not too far from me, did you notice kind of a burnt tar - burnt rubber scent in the air last night? Thinking if it's all that smoke that's almost done passing by the whole Mid-Eastern Continent here. 


Edited by Procyon, 04 June 2019 - 04:16 PM.

  • Stardust Dave likes this

#136 Stardust Dave

Stardust Dave

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,147
  • Joined: 15 Jan 2016
  • Loc: 39*N 122*.40' W

Posted 05 June 2019 - 04:40 PM

"Seyfert's Sextet".

 I'd been trying to see from home with 13" , just cannot see it.

I was able to get out last night above the lights of town

 on the ridge and pointed the big scope where Seyfert's should be . Soon was viewing for first time and ended up around 350X to really see the members well . Had never got around to this object (these objects) 

 

Speaking of 6207 and region of M13, I again had no luck seeing IC 4617 - even in the big scope last night.frown.gif


Edited by Stardust Dave, 05 June 2019 - 04:47 PM.

  • Inkswitch, KidOrion and Procyon like this

#137 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 05 June 2019 - 05:08 PM

"Seyfert's Sextet".

 

Nice.

 

Members of Seyfert's Sextet

 

Name Type Distance from Sun (million ly) Magnitude

NGC 6027 S0 pec. ~190 +14.7
NGC 6027a Sa pec. ~190 +15.4
NGC 6027b S0 pec. ~190 +15.4
NGC 6027c SB(S)c ~190 +16
NGC 6027d SB(S)bc pec. ~877[4] +15.6
NGC 6027e SB0 pec. ~190 +16.5


Edited by Procyon, 05 June 2019 - 05:08 PM.

  • Stardust Dave likes this

#138 Stardust Dave

Stardust Dave

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,147
  • Joined: 15 Jan 2016
  • Loc: 39*N 122*.40' W

Posted 05 June 2019 - 05:20 PM

Counted at least 5 of them, I was kind of spellbound - and under a hood was not looking at the chart much ATM.


  • Procyon likes this

#139 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,950
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 05 June 2019 - 09:29 PM

I was at a dark site with two fellow CAS members on Monday night.  One had his 12.5" f/4.5 Dob; the other a 20" f/3 Dob.  I observed the elliptical galaxy NGC 5813 for the first time through the 12.5" and the planetary nebula NGC 6765 for the first time through the 20".

 

NGC 5813 is a 4.2 x 3.0 arc minute, magnitude 10.5, type E1 elliptical galaxy in Virgo at 15h 01m 11.2s, +01° 42' 07".  It lies at the end of an arc of fairly faint field stars.  I give this otherwise run-of-the-mill galaxy a rating of 3.5, primarily due to the appearance of the field of which it is a part. 

 

http://spider.seds.o...alogNumber=5813

 

http://chandra.harva...gc5813_wide.jpg

 

NGC 6765 (PK 62+9.1) is a 38 arc second, magnitude 12.9, irregular bipolar planetary nebula in Lyra at 19h 11m 08.2s, +30° 33' 02".  This object is very faint and I rate it a 1.5 on appearance but a 2.0 on novelty. 

 

http://spider.seds.o...alogNumber=6765

 

https://www.bing.com...&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

 

Dave Mitsky


  • Inkswitch, KidOrion, Procyon and 1 other like this

#140 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 05 June 2019 - 09:53 PM

Forgot to add these, bye Spring...

 

Open Cluster M67 4/5 just for being the only OC in the sky, pretty looking too.

 

V CrB Carbon Star 5/5 for a Carbon star, Dark Blood Red Color.

 

M66 Galaxy 4/5, some nights higher.

 

The Cocoon Galaxy, 4.5/5 


Edited by Procyon, 05 June 2019 - 10:05 PM.

  • KidOrion and Stardust Dave like this

#141 Stardust Dave

Stardust Dave

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,147
  • Joined: 15 Jan 2016
  • Loc: 39*N 122*.40' W

Posted 06 June 2019 - 01:50 PM

Along with Seyfert's , Tuesday night re-observed 5907 in the 20" after completely forgetting the one observation I had back in 1999 under sketchy skies.

Incredible and huge, tolerated lots of magnification. Still thinking about the EP impression.

Absent were the big hoops you see in the pictures. Don't know if they can be seen visually. 

 

Rating it a "5"

 

It was on Dave's Mitsky's CN list of "celestial events" and objects for June .smile.gif  

Not sure how this one escaped my hotlist of favorites. There's just so much to look at up there.


Edited by Stardust Dave, 06 June 2019 - 01:54 PM.

  • Dave Mitsky, Inkswitch, KidOrion and 1 other like this

#142 Dave Mitsky

Dave Mitsky

    ISS

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 91,950
  • Joined: 08 Apr 2002
  • Loc: PA, USA, Planet Earth

Posted 06 June 2019 - 02:28 PM

I had a good view of NGC 5907 through the previously mentioned 20" f/3 Dob on Monday night.  It somewhat resembled the sketch at http://www.deepsky-d...-2011-04-03.jpg


  • Procyon and Stardust Dave like this

#143 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,765
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 09 June 2019 - 09:51 AM

Had an exhausting, but exhilarating, session from midnight to 3 a.m. last night.  Observed the following for the first time:

 

NGC 6231-- 5 (Too low on the horizon for a scope, but pretty impressive in the 20x80s)

NGC 6369-- 5 (Nice little ring)

NGC 6309-- 4 (Need to come back to this one with more mag)

NGC 6528 and 6522 -- 3 (Dim, challenging GCs)

NGC 6642 -- 4 (It's a pity 4.  I feel sorry for this GC, living in M22's shadow smile.gif)

M55! -- 5 (Pretty dim, but I've had such a hard time finding this one, I'm giving myself a 5 for persistence.)

 

These were just the first-time objects.  I also had a blast revisiting old friends from last year in Sagittarius and marveling at how much better I can see them with a 10" aperture.  What a night!


Edited by vdog, 09 June 2019 - 12:06 PM.

  • Inkswitch, KidOrion, Procyon and 2 others like this

#144 Jeff Morgan

Jeff Morgan

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12,119
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2003
  • Loc: Prescott, AZ

Posted 09 June 2019 - 03:27 PM

Had a good (but short) session after moonset last night using the 16" f/7 Zambuto. Unfortunately, set alarm incorrectly so I lost an hour of precious time.

 

Some joyriding in Sagittarius testing out a new APM 24 UF against a 22 Panoptic. Results inconclusive. Then I decided to pick up observing list stragglers in Hercules and Draco (why I left the Milky Way I don't know ...) using the NV eyepiece. Anyway, found a couple of gems new to me. From my notes:

 

NGC 5907: Score 4! Hi aspect ratio spiral galaxy strong core, fairly large. Does OK prime focus better reduced using the either the 0.7x reducer or the 55 Plossl afocally. The afocal configuration was the best view. At first I thought I saw a hint of a dust lane but it appears just to be the contrast between the edge of the galaxy in space. Not quite sure why I get that impression on just one edge. Just for giggles tried it in the APM 24UF, nice but not even close to the image intensifier view despite the large magnification advantage.

 

Edit: Looking at images of this galaxy this morning there is in fact a dust lane. I suppose observer bias is to blame for me discarding the initial dust lane observation, I had an expectation that with an edge-on galaxy a dust lane would bisect the galaxy. But on this one there is enough of a tilt so that the dust lane was right near the edge with just thin line of brightness at the edge. The asymmetry should have been the tip-off, should have pumped the magnification a bit more.

 

NGC 6543: Score 4. Very high surface brightness PN. Good in all NV configurations, takes magnification well, best with 2.4x Barlow. In the low power mode nearby NGC 6552 (magnitude 14.5) was very easy to see direct vision. Oddly enough using a hydrogen alpha filter masks interior detail and makes the entire nebula appear almost uniform. Without the filter the interior detail stands out. This one is so bright a filter is not required - or desired! Also tried the Leica Zoom with the DGM filter. Nice also but less interior detail. In better seeing I suspect this one will take any magnification thrown at it.

 

Last week CN member Scottsdale90 was up for a wide field NV shoot-out between his TEC140 and my Takahashi Epsilon. Among his toys was a SQM device, which I have never used before. Nice to know my zenith skies run around 20.5, when the device is free-standing. When on the observing table and somewhat screened by eyepiece cases the reading jumps to 20.9. My worst horizon is south at 19.9.

 

I'm going to have to get one of those meters.


Edited by Jeff Morgan, 09 June 2019 - 03:28 PM.

  • Inkswitch and Procyon like this

#145 Procyon

Procyon

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6,572
  • Joined: 23 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Eastern Canada

Posted 09 June 2019 - 06:48 PM

Forgot to add these, bye Spring...

 

Open Cluster M67 4/5 just for being the only OC in the sky, pretty looking too. Forgot the Beehive right next to it (M44), surprised no one caught that lol. M44 too wide for my SCT also. grin.gif  Interesting that the Sun may originate from there: https://www.youtube....h?v=ZW1NP_Cb0Go

 

V CrB Carbon Star 5/5 for a Carbon star, Dark Blood Red Color. Update: Observed this star again last night, unless I was looking at another star, this was no longer red. 

 

M66 Galaxy 4/5, some nights higher. 

 

The Cocoon Galaxy, 4.5/5 A very unique looking pair of Galaxies. NGC 4490 is probably a 5 after seeing a picture of it merging with NGC 4485. https://www.skyandte...alaxy-ngc-4490/

Saw M102 and NGC 5907 also, thanks for reminding me David & Jeff, 4/5 both very observable and 2 of the final brighter Spring Galaxies.


Edited by Procyon, 09 June 2019 - 06:58 PM.


#146 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,765
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 11 June 2019 - 10:32 AM

Another marathon a.m. session, likely the last for at least a week or two as I must yield the night to Luna and her mid-month cycle:

 

NGC 6960 and 6992-- 5 and 5 (I've read a lot about these targets on these forums.  Had to see what all the hype was about.  Now I know. waytogo.gif )

 

NGC 7009-- 5 (Brilliant blue, but can't resolve the Saturn-like "rings.")

 

NGC 6818 -- 5 (Can just make out a faint ring structure at 480x.)

 

M110! -- 286 (Really, it was nothing special to look at but I've been chasing this ghost since last year.  It was special just for that reason.  Heck, I should throw a party.)

 

M33!-- 4  (My first attempt at this since going to a 10" aperture.  Averted vision revealed the faint core right where it should be.)

 

Cygnus Star Cloud --- 5 (Not sure if this counts as a DSO, but it was right at the zenith and clearly visible.  First time I've seen any part of the Milky Way that distinctly with just the naked eye.  I must have spent at least half an hour staring at it.)

 

It was nearly a four-hour session, so I got my money's worth for sure.  Take that, Luna!


Edited by vdog, 11 June 2019 - 12:07 PM.

  • Procyon and jcj380 like this

#147 Inkswitch

Inkswitch

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 363
  • Joined: 09 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Walhonding, OH USA

Posted 19 June 2019 - 05:54 AM

A few nights back I was observing double stars because, the moon.  I was working Bootes and noticed an open cluster symbol near Arcturus.  It was marked Picov 1 aka Napoleon's Hat, turns out it is not a cluster but an asterism.  Seven stars of near equal magnitude make this well detached asterism that looks very much like it's namesake.  It is within a degree or so of Arcturus so it is easy to find and will certainly be a crowd pleaser should you choose to use it at outreach or with friends.  I rate it a 4.


Edited by Inkswitch, 19 June 2019 - 05:55 AM.

  • Procyon likes this

#148 Bowlerhat

Bowlerhat

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 504
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2019
  • Loc: Melbourne, Australia

Posted 19 June 2019 - 11:02 AM

M42 with naked eye, but the first one seen through a scope would be pleidaes, and the first one trough EAA is Jewel box cluster.



#149 antariksha

antariksha

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 43
  • Joined: 22 Jul 2017
  • Loc: India

Posted 19 June 2019 - 01:12 PM

Somehow, saw this post very late..So much is said already. I have been passionate about DSOs and have been observing for a while now.

 

But this post is tricky one..observed first time and rate it!!. Let me rather tweak question the other way.

I have invited my friends, relatives to my village house ( the astronomy house!!). And they are all laypersons for astronomy, star gazing. Which are the few key objects, they get excited about and they remember those for ever???

Let me think from their point and answer it.

 

Andromeda M31

M42

Perseus double cluster

Omega centauri

M51



#150 vdog

vdog

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,765
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018
  • Loc: California Central Valley, U.S.A.

Posted 21 June 2019 - 03:00 PM

But this post is tricky one..observed first time and rate it!!.

A numerical score is a rather reductive way to convey one's enjoyment of a target.  Anyway, I'm sure my ratings end up being ratings of how good a look at a target my local light pollution allowed me to have.

 

Nevertheless, smile.gif

 

NGC 6811 -- 5 (Reminds me of Caroline's Rose, but not as dense.)

 

NGC 6826 -- 5 (I love a planetary nebula with a bright central star.)

 

NGC 7027 -- 5 (Nice deep blue color.)

 

IC 4593 -- 4  (Tiny.  I don't have the magnification for this one with my current equipment.)

 

Been hitting planetary nebulae pretty hard over the last month or so. They are my new addiction. grin.gif


Edited by vdog, 21 June 2019 - 04:57 PM.

  • Procyon likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics