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classic scopes and classic folks

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#1 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 06:16 PM

Hey there  Hope everyone is well heading into the 11th month of 2018

Where do the years go we ask?

Classic scopes age  and so do the classic folks

 

Is it odd or is it wierd that we can miss the posts and wise words of experienced folks when they go silent for periods of time?

 

As a resident kinda new guy   i admire those who have appreciated the classic scopes from way back..

I learn so much from the classic folks talking classic scopes.......

 

Was there a time when you were relatively new at this? Are there folks you learned from over the years?

 

Are there some that are gone but not forgotten ? 

How did folks communicate before the classic forums?


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#2 Garyth64

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 07:26 PM

How did folks communicate before the classic forums?

 

We wrote letters.  Talked on the phone.  Chatted with people face to face.  smile.gif


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#3 clamchip

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 07:35 PM

Way back before the PC, and a hand held calculator was a marvel only the rich could afford we

would meet in the library to discuss telescopes. Anyone was welcome. We also talked about

other things like who we would like to zap with a charged up capacitor but that's another story.

A little later clubs, mostly connected with school brought us together. That's pretty much how it

was for me.

 

Robert


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#4 CHASLX200

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:00 PM

I went to club meetiings before i was kicked out in 1982. And star parties marty.


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#5 Garyth64

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:48 PM

Why were you . . .never mind. smile.gif


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#6 terraclarke

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:00 PM

Clubs, friends, newsletters, word of mouth, mail.


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#7 clamchip

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:12 PM

Here's one of our meetings, on your right Glen Ganson, next is me, then the back of Mark Abbott's

head.

I'm not sure who the fellow is in the fore ground. This is the 600 section (Technology) of

the Redmond Jr. High library about 1970

Scan0002.jpg


Edited by clamchip, 05 November 2018 - 09:23 PM.

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#8 CHASLX200

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:14 PM

What is that?



#9 Garyth64

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:29 PM

gone but not forgotten . . .

 

Richard Lloyd, Mike Manyak, Tom Waineo . . .


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#10 clamchip

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:32 PM

There I think I got it. The funky photo is a real live piece of film I think David Allen took that photo and

developed it. I have a extraordinary photo of Mars Dave took. I'll see if I can find it.

Robert



#11 brian dewelles

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Posted 05 November 2018 - 11:46 PM

For me, i think more than any one thing, the publication "starry messenger" showed me their were a bunch of people who liked jaegers and edmund and cave and fecker to name a few. We didnt get internet till our daughter went to college in 97 so for about three years before that I anticipated the arrival every month of that little magazine full of ads and pored over it for an hour or two when i got it. I bet i bought and sold 15 scopes because of it and many people i first met through starry messenger are still guys i deal with today. It was great. Cloudy nights is better, but i think i like CN because its sort of like starry messenger.


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#12 starman876

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 12:16 AM

For me, i think more than any one thing, the publication "starry messenger" showed me their were a bunch of people who liked jaegers and edmund and cave and fecker to name a few. We didnt get internet till our daughter went to college in 97 so for about three years before that I anticipated the arrival every month of that little magazine full of ads and pored over it for an hour or two when i got it. I bet i bought and sold 15 scopes because of it and many people i first met through starry messenger are still guys i deal with today. It was great. Cloudy nights is better, but i think i like CN because its sort of like starry messenger.

I miss the starry messenger. Like you I could not wait to get it in the mail.  


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#13 rolo

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 12:53 AM

I went to club meetiings before i was kicked out in 1982. And star parties marty.

Why would they do that? You were just a kid. 


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#14 AllanDystrup

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 04:44 AM

.

 

     Interesting... Back then in the 50-60'ies when grandpa was a kid, there was no such thing as a "classic scopes" hobby, -- no antique sales, no flea market finds (and certainly no scopes in MY grandpas attic!)  Oh yes, a few pre-war Zeiss and Merz refractors from Danish observatories somehow ended up in the hands of amateurs, but that was an exception to the rule.

 

     We bought our 2-3" scopes (aka. refractors) new from German or Japanese import (Zeiss, Unitron). The criterion was a good stable mount and a Dawes "diffraction limited" lens. A few ads for optical imports were in the newspapers, and astronomy news were communicated through one scientific journal for Scandinavia, -- mostly covering hard astrophysics but sometimes also including a review or observation report by a knowledgeable amateur. Luckily we had Patrick Moores books written for amateur astronomers.

 

     A few hardcore amateurs bought large 4" Unitron refractors and installed them in private observatories. No collection, restoration, comparing, competing.  Focus was not so much on the tools of the trade as on careful observation and sometimes even scientific research, mostly in stellar and lunar astronomy.

 

     This all changed in the 80'ies. Then came the Vixen Newtonians and Fluorites. Then came the Celestrons, then came the Meades. Then came the Dobsons… Ahh well, it's all progress, as Mark Knofler sang  wink.gif  (https://www.youtube....h?v=Q1Wp2ASqyxI) :


He built a cabin and a winter store
And he ploughed up the ground by the cold lake shore
And the other travellers came walking down the track
And they never went further, no, they never went back

 

Then came the churches, then came the schools
Then came the lawyers, then came the rules
Then came the trains and the trucks with their load
And the dirty old track was the Telegraph Road

 

Then came the mines, then came the ore
Then there was the hard times, then there was a war
Telegraph sang a song about the world outside
Telegraph Road got so deep and so wide
Like a rolling river

 

     -- Allan


Edited by AllanDystrup, 06 November 2018 - 06:29 AM.

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#15 CHASLX200

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 06:19 AM

For me, i think more than any one thing, the publication "starry messenger" showed me their were a bunch of people who liked jaegers and edmund and cave and fecker to name a few. We didnt get internet till our daughter went to college in 97 so for about three years before that I anticipated the arrival every month of that little magazine full of ads and pored over it for an hour or two when i got it. I bet i bought and sold 15 scopes because of it and many people i first met through starry messenger are still guys i deal with today. It was great. Cloudy nights is better, but i think i like CN because its sort of like starry messenger.

Only reason i ever got a computer was my friend had one and i saw Astromart and that was it i had to buy one the next day.  I had the Starry Mess since it first came out in 1985.  Then when Astromart got going it was over rover.  That was in 1997 when AOL 3.0 was around.  Astromart was hopping with ads back then. I was in heaven deven.


Edited by CHASLX200, 06 November 2018 - 06:22 AM.

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#16 CHASLX200

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 06:20 AM

Why would they do that? You were just a kid. 

Long story. Lets just say it was Marsh mallows and a 10" F/5 Cave dave.


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#17 Defenderslideguitar

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 12:48 PM

nice responses   thanks


Edited by Defenderslideguitar, 07 November 2018 - 12:22 PM.


#18 starman876

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 01:00 PM

I look at the classic folks as being real classy and then there are some which are  classic lol.gif


Edited by starman876, 06 November 2018 - 01:07 PM.

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#19 starman876

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 01:06 PM

I remember my first computer in 1984.  Not even sure there was an internet then.  I had to figure out how to use one for work. 8088 processor.  Only DOS then no windows yet.    Later AOL became the premier IP provider by then we had Windows and 486 processors.  We come a long way since then.     


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#20 Exnihilo

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 01:19 PM

I remember my first computer in 1984.  Not even sure there was an internet then.  I had to figure out how to use one for work. 8088 processor.  Only DOS then no windows yet.    Later AOL became the premier IP provider by then we had Windows and 486 processors.  We come a long way since then.

My first was 1981, an Apple IIe. Believe it or not, I was actually writing code for avionics which uses an 80186 as recently as two years ago.

#21 tim53

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 01:48 PM

I corresponded for a while via snail mail with Earle F. Dodds, of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, about fixed eyepiece telescopes.  He didn't tend to call his "Springfields" because he made a number of modifications to Porter's design to make them easier to build from common materials.  His also tended not to have the overhanging counterweight, which can be a hazard in the dark.  He wrote a number of articles in Astronomy magazine in the early 80s.  I used to have all the issues from back then, but lost them in a house fire in 2001.

 

-tim.



#22 starman876

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 02:45 PM

My first was 1981, an Apple IIe. Believe it or not, I was actually writing code for avionics which uses an 80186 as recently as two years ago.

you got to be kidding me. an 80186 until two years ago?   Where did they find replacement memory chips.  That was when 512K of memory was a big thing. 



#23 twhite

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 03:18 PM

.

 

     Interesting... Back then in the 50-60'ies when grandpa was a kid, there was no such thing as a "classic scopes" hobby, -- no antique sales, no flea market finds (and certainly no scopes in MY grandpas attic!)  Oh yes, a few pre-war Zeiss and Merz refractors from Danish observatories somehow ended up in the hands of amateurs, but that was an exception to the rule.

 

     We bought our 2-3" scopes (aka. refractors) new from German or Japanese import (Zeiss, Unitron). The criterion was a good stable mount and a Dawes "diffraction limited" lens. A few ads for optical imports were in the newspapers, and astronomy news were communicated through one scientific journal for Scandinavia, -- mostly covering hard astrophysics but sometimes also including a review or observation report by a knowledgeable amateur. Luckily we had Patrick Moores books written for amateur astronomers.

 

     A few hardcore amateurs bought large 4" Unitron refractors and installed them in private observatories. No collection, restoration, comparing, competing.  Focus was not so much on the tools of the trade as on careful observation and sometimes even scientific research, mostly in stellar and lunar astronomy.

 

     This all changed in the 80'ies. Then came the Vixen Newtonians and Fluorites. Then came the Celestrons, then came the Meades. Then came the Dobsons… Ahh well, it's all progress, as Mark Knofler sang  wink.gif  (https://www.youtube....h?v=Q1Wp2ASqyxI) :


He built a cabin and a winter store
And he ploughed up the ground by the cold lake shore
And the other travellers came walking down the track
And they never went further, no, they never went back

 

Then came the churches, then came the schools
Then came the lawyers, then came the rules
Then came the trains and the trucks with their load
And the dirty old track was the Telegraph Road

 

Then came the mines, then came the ore
Then there was the hard times, then there was a war
Telegraph sang a song about the world outside
Telegraph Road got so deep and so wide
Like a rolling river

 

     -- Allan

Glad to see there's at least one other Dire Straits fan here.  waytogo.gif

 

But, yeah, progress.  Sigh.


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#24 CHASLX200

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Posted 06 November 2018 - 06:58 PM

Chas

 

I thought I heard Kasmos say once that you were also one of the early contributors to Yahoo groups?

 

B

Never really been on them groups. I was on SAA in late 97.  Boy i sure got some threads and people going over there.


Edited by CHASLX200, 06 November 2018 - 06:58 PM.

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