Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Pretty decent deal on a 20"

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
95 replies to this topic

#51 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5202
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 13 November 2018 - 11:52 AM

I sure never see them in FL and if it was local i would sell my soul.  No way i would set it up and break it down just to view a planet each nite…….  I am temtped to offer him 1k to bring it to me.

 

Set-up - I'm lucky enough to live in a 'safe' rural location - so I just leave my Obsession 20 set up on the front lawn for 3 or 4 days at a time - even a week occasionally. One time I had need to look at my home in "Google Earth" - and was at first confused by the "long white thing" in front of the house - until I realized it was the scope under its white cover. It has survived a number of thunderstorms - and was covered with snow one time. Those covers really work. Today I never take the scope down in the dark - I always wait for a dry morning.

 

While I've never done it - I've considered the possibility of making a 'used scope buying trip' into a mini-vacation. Take public transport to the seller's place - take a look at the scope, and maybe even observe thru it before buying - rent a van and drive home. If lucky you might even pass some of the great dark-sky places on the way home! If the thing is a dog - well you can always take public transport home - or continue with your mini-trip.


Edited by George N, 13 November 2018 - 11:54 AM.

 

#52 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5202
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 13 November 2018 - 12:06 PM

…...

 

Not bashing the scope - it will work great for some people.  But most people are not looking for such a scope, and that reduces its value substantially.  It is like selling a home with pink carpet, floral wall paper, gold hardware, and a closed-floor plan.  Fine in the 70s, but not now.  And the servocat is like saying "but the home has a nice furnace! that's worth a lot!"  People don't value things like that.  

 

Big Dobs of all kinds have always taken a bigger 'price hit' than say a nice used C-8..... because the number of amateur astronomers wanting an 18 or larger is pretty small, most who are are in the 'age category' where fitness and health issues come into play (in his book DaveK has a section on big Dobs vs health), geographic distance becomes an issue for buying an expensive item unseen. ( I once helped a guy set up an Obsession 25 that looked like it had traveled the last 100 yards by being dragged on its side. If that thing showed up at my door as a used purchase I'd be very upset. )

 

On the other hand..... over the past 2 years when I casually mentioned at a couple of big star parties that I might be interested in selling my Obsession 20 F/5 I was surprised to have a half-dozen or more guys show up expressing an interest in possibly buying it. Of course I'm sure they were expecting a "good deal".....  wink.gif 


 

#53 Mike Spooner

Mike Spooner

    Vendor (mirrors)

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 531
  • Joined: 06 Aug 2010

Posted 13 November 2018 - 06:20 PM

Dang! After reading this thread I think we need a geriatric forum!smile.gif  I totally understand the safety issue but did everybody get old at once? ... Well, maybe. frown.gif Seems like a safe solution could be had for less than the $5k premium of a faster scope. Good idea even for youthful 'invincible' types. I had enough close calls when I was "agile" that I really try to use extreme care now. Got me thinking I might add LEDs to the edge of the steps on my ladder. 

 

I really do agree that step ladders are pretty marginal for observing even though it's been a go to big DOB accessory for decades. The narrow steps are one of my biggest peeves. Another is the spacing. 

 

Seems a shame to miss affordable views of a larger scope due to bad ladder tech.

 

Mike Spooner


 

#54 CHASLX200

CHASLX200

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 17372
  • Joined: 29 Sep 2007
  • Loc: Tampa area Florida

Posted 13 November 2018 - 06:37 PM

I grew up on ladder scopes at age 14 with a 10" F/9.6. I would be right at home with that 20" F/5.  Would rather it be a F/6.


 

#55 starcanoe

starcanoe

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2439
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Gulf Coast, Panhandle of Florida

Posted 13 November 2018 - 06:42 PM

I'm just going to install a big motorized scissor jack on my Hoveround when the time comes.


 

#56 bunyon

bunyon

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4691
  • Joined: 23 Oct 2010
  • Loc: Winston-Salem, NC

Posted 13 November 2018 - 07:52 PM

I’d say, looking at today’s classifieds, that the deal in the OP is decent at best.

My basic feeling with any Astro gear is that I will never be able to sell it. If it isn’t worth the sale price to me I don’t buy it. Anything I might eventually recoup in a sale is nice but I don’t count on it.
 

#57 Redbetter

Redbetter

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7293
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2016
  • Loc: Central Valley, CA

Posted 13 November 2018 - 08:26 PM

Dang! After reading this thread I think we need a geriatric forum!smile.gif  I totally understand the safety issue but did everybody get old at once? ... Well, maybe. frown.gif Seems like a safe solution could be had for less than the $5k premium of a faster scope. Good idea even for youthful 'invincible' types. I had enough close calls when I was "agile" that I really try to use extreme care now. Got me thinking I might add LEDs to the edge of the steps on my ladder. 

 

I really do agree that step ladders are pretty marginal for observing even though it's been a go to big DOB accessory for decades. The narrow steps are one of my biggest peeves. Another is the spacing. 

 

Seems a shame to miss affordable views of a larger scope due to bad ladder tech.

 

Mike Spooner

 

Platform ladders with deeper steps such as the Cosco I have work well.  I do wish mine had 3 steps then the platform rather than 2.  That would be about the ideal spacing to fit a boot while providing better increments for observing.  I get around this somewhat by turning the ladder 90 degrees at times to make the length work better (also eliminates the turn of the body to the eyepiece.)

 

I am somewhat surprised that nobody seems to have produced custom ladders for the hobby.  Unfortunately, now that the trend is to very short ratios I doubt that anyone will ever address this, particularly for the monster scopes that are still tall even with sub f/4 mirrors. 

 

That Cosco is a beauty of a design and looks adaptable to one or two more feet, but it is a complex looking fabrication so some of the more complicated curved and channeled frame pieces might have to be simplified. 

 

The only real concern I have about ladders is that I forget what step I am on while concentrating on finding the next target, recording info, etc.  I sometimes skip a step on the way down...   my solution is to always wear my hiking boots when observing.  They are good enough for steep boulder field scrambles up mountain peaks and they protect me from breaking an ankle when I do something stupid.


 

#58 RKK

RKK

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 30 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Colorado

Posted 14 November 2018 - 12:22 PM

I just upgraded my first scope, a Z12 to a 20"f/5 Obsession #494 with recently re-coated Galaxy mirror.  The Obsession is in wonderful condition and a great value per inch.  At nearly 66 trips around the sun for me, the scope is a lot to manage, but once setup, the need for a ladder is not an issue.  To be fair, the Obsession is actually easier for me to haul than the Z12 was.  I can haul it in my Jeep Wrangler, when time permits a trip to the truly dark.  And of course once I had the scope home and time to look the sky has been only cloudy or hazy at best.  Not sure if it is new scope curse or the three new eye pieces I added that brought on the curse.  Hopefully, Thursday or Friday night it will be clear.


 

#59 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 76049
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 15 November 2018 - 10:36 AM

Dang! After reading this thread I think we need a geriatric forum!smile.gif  I totally understand the safety issue but did everybody get old at once? ... Well, maybe. frown.gif Seems like a safe solution could be had for less than the $5k premium of a faster scope. Good idea even for youthful 'invincible' types. I had enough close calls when I was "agile" that I really try to use extreme care now. Got me thinking I might add LEDs to the edge of the steps on my ladder. 

 

I really do agree that step ladders are pretty marginal for observing even though it's been a go to big DOB accessory for decades. The narrow steps are one of my biggest peeves. Another is the spacing. 

 

Seems a shame to miss affordable views of a larger scope due to bad ladder tech.

 

Mike Spooner

Mike:

 

You make some good points.  

 

A better ladder was my approach. I wasn't going to spend big money on a fast scope so when I bought my 25 inch F/5 seven or eight years ago, in soon realized that a step ladder was not a good thing for a scope that's 10 feet tall. Working on this with Jeff Morgan, we both ended up with Cotterman rolling folding ladders.

 

A top notch ladder is like a top notch observing chair, it defines the experience. I had that scope for about 6 years and customized the ladder with an eyepiece/accessory tray so everything I needed was at my fingertips, no climbing up and down the ladder to swap eyepieces. With the railings, to lean against and hold onto, the wide steps, the shallow angle, I could easily and safely observe with 2 hand free for observing.  It made observing much more comfortable and a much more pleasurable experience. 

 

Still, as I was zeroing in on 70, I was up there one December night on the top platform looking around at the night sky, at the country side, it's a pretty good view when your eye is over 10 feet off the ground, and I had that Eureka moment.  I observe alone, the nearest medical facility was 50 miles.  If I slipped and fell, it would be sometime the next morning when my nearest neighbor found me.  It was time to downside. 

 

So, soon enough, I found a never been used 22 inch F/4.4 Starsplitter on Astromart, I bought it, sold the Obsession and haven't looked back. This photo shows just how much more reasonable the 22 inch F/4.4 is than the 25 inch. 

 

4 Dobs plus Jon.jpg
 
The smaller scope is less demanding from a safety standpoint but I wasn't going to give up the luxuries and comfort of a platform ladder with railings and advantages of having my eyepieces and gear right there.  So.. I put together a rolling ladder pretty much the way I wanted it, learned a few lessons from the previous ladder.  I could probably use something more easily transported but I would not like it, I am spoiled. It's just so nice to have a railing to lean against, to not have to hoist the ladder to move it, have the ladder stocked with eyepieces and filters and food and drink.. My neighbor Rollie suggested the water bottle rack.  
 
Starsplitter plus ladder.jpg

 

- I like your suggestion of a custom ladder.  i know you have the skills to build a really nice aluminum ladder, I don't.  But a rolling folding aluminum ladder that was designed specifically for observing with a large Dob would be very nice to own and I would be willing to pay at least $1000 for one that was designed for the 22 inch.  It would probably have more closely spaced steps, the railings would be designed around observing, the wheels would be large diameter to handle the sometimes irregular and softer surfaces I observe with.  The accessory trays would bolt on. It would be light enough to transport.  It might even have a built in medical alert system.  wink.gif

 

When I am at supermarket or big box store I look at their ladders, the aluminum ones are light and sturdy, yeah.. 

 

- Aging.  Money, time and energy, those are three quantities that go into observing with a large scope.  Most young folks have the energy but probably not the time or the money.  Older folks often have the time and money but not the energy.  There is a window in there when one has time and money and enough energy.  

 

But clearly a 25 inch F/5 is best as a young man's scope.  One thing I was concerned about when I was selling the 25 inch F/5 was whether a potential buyer had the size and strength to deal with a scope that size.  I was very relieved when the eventual buyer showed up to spend a night with the scope that he was probably about 30 and about 6' 4".. 

 

He was the right guy.  He fit the scope with the 2 upper cages and second mirror plus all his junk in a small Ford Transit van and he hoisted the Cotterman Rolling Folding ladder up on top.. It's been nearly two years, I talked to him the other day, he just hauls the scope out and sets it up, ladder and all.  

 

Obsession sold 2.jpg
obsession sold 3.jpg
 
When you are 30, you can do these things. When you are 70, you remember that once, years ago, you could do those things. 
 
-  So Mike, when are you going into the custom ladder business?  smile.gif
 
Jon

 


 

#60 dgoldb

dgoldb

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 873
  • Joined: 23 Oct 2015

Posted 15 November 2018 - 05:34 PM

A ladder isn't the only issue.  The whole design is just bigger and heavier.  Deep mirror box, thick wood construction, thick mirror, long trusses, substantial UTA.  Even as a (relatively) young man, I don't want to lift those things.  Even young backs can get hurt.  

 

As light pollution worsens, you have fewer people observing in their backyards, and more who have to travel to dark sites.  That requires disassembly and re-assembly every observing session.  That is another disadvantage of these older, bigger, heavier scopes.  It further reduces the buyer pool.  (edit: not to mention the limiting factor that you need a buyer with a vehicle that can fit these scopes.)

 

If you are a (younger) person with a dedicated setup at home (or at a dark site), these are fantastic scopes at their prices.  But that is a very small demographic.  Most people who live out in the boonies are retired - and those people don't want to deal with these behemoths.   


Edited by dgoldb, 15 November 2018 - 05:37 PM.

 

#61 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 16 November 2018 - 08:57 AM

Dang! After reading this thread I think we need a geriatric forum!smile.gif I totally understand the safety issue but did everybody get old at once? ... Well, maybe. frown.gif Seems like a safe solution could be had for less than the $5k premium of a faster scope. Good idea even for youthful 'invincible' types. I had enough close calls when I was "agile" that I really try to use extreme care now. Got me thinking I might add LEDs to the edge of the steps on my ladder.

I really do agree that step ladders are pretty marginal for observing even though it's been a go to big DOB accessory for decades. The narrow steps are one of my biggest peeves. Another is the spacing.

Seems a shame to miss affordable views of a larger scope due to bad ladder tech.

Mike Spooner


For me, I've not yet seen a ladder that let's me sit. My knees don't let me stand more than 20 minutes without some pain, and 2 hours means using my scooter the next day.

Edited by stargazer193857, 17 November 2018 - 12:39 AM.

 

#62 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 16 November 2018 - 09:09 AM


Mike:

You make some good points.

A better ladder was my approach. I wasn't going to spend big money on a fast scope so when I bought my 25 inch F/5 seven or eight years ago, in soon realized that a step ladder was not a good thing for a scope that's 10 feet tall. Working on this with Jeff Morgan, we both ended up with Cotterman rolling folding ladders.

A top notch ladder is like a top notch observing chair, it defines the experience. I had that scope for about 6 years and customized the ladder with an eyepiece/accessory tray so everything I needed was at my fingertips, no climbing up and down the ladder to swap eyepieces. With the railings, to lean against and hold onto, the wide steps, the shallow angle, I could easily and safely observe with 2 hand free for observing. It made observing much more comfortable and a much more pleasurable experience.

Still, as I was zeroing in on 70, I was up there one December night on the top platform looking around at the night sky, at the country side, it's a pretty good view when your eye is over 10 feet off the ground, and I had that Eureka moment. I observe alone, the nearest medical facility was 50 miles. If I slipped and fell, it would be sometime the next morning when my nearest neighbor found me. It was time to downside.

So, soon enough, I found a never been used 22 inch F/4.4 Starsplitter on Astromart, I bought it, sold the Obsession and haven't looked back. This photo shows just how much more reasonable the 22 inch F/4.4 is than the 25 inch.



The smaller scope is less demanding from a safety standpoint but I wasn't going to give up the luxuries and comfort of a platform ladder with railings and advantages of having my eyepieces and gear right there. So.. I put together a rolling ladder pretty much the way I wanted it, learned a few lessons from the previous ladder. I could probably use something more easily transported but I would not like it, I am spoiled. It's just so nice to have a railing to lean against, to not have to hoist the ladder to move it, have the ladder stocked with eyepieces and filters and food and drink.. My neighbor Rollie suggested the water bottle rack.




- I like your suggestion of a custom ladder. i know you have the skills to build a really nice aluminum ladder, I don't. But a rolling folding aluminum ladder that was designed specifically for observing with a large Dob would be very nice to own and I would be willing to pay at least $1000 for one that was designed for the 22 inch. It would probably have more closely spaced steps, the railings would be designed around observing, the wheels would be large diameter to handle the sometimes irregular and softer surfaces I observe with. The accessory trays would bolt on. It would be light enough to transport. It might even have a built in medical alert system. wink.gif

When I am at supermarket or big box store I look at their ladders, the aluminum ones are light and sturdy, yeah..

- Aging. Money, time and energy, those are three quantities that go into observing with a large scope. Most young folks have the energy but probably not the time or the money. Older folks often have the time and money but not the energy. There is a window in there when one has time and money and enough energy.

But clearly a 25 inch F/5 is best as a young man's scope. One thing I was concerned about when I was selling the 25 inch F/5 was whether a potential buyer had the size and strength to deal with a scope that size. I was very relieved when the eventual buyer showed up to spend a night with the scope that he was probably about 30 and about 6' 4"..

He was the right guy. He fit the scope with the 2 upper cages and second mirror plus all his junk in a small Ford Transit van and he hoisted the Cotterman Rolling Folding ladder up on top.. It's been nearly two years, I talked to him the other day, he just hauls the scope out and sets it up, ladder and all.




When you are 30, you can do these things. When you are 70, you remember that once, years ago, you could do those things.

- So Mike, when are you going into the custom ladder business? smile.gif

Jon


John has been such a good contributed, that someone needs to design him a ladder. We need to post design ideas before building the first idea that comes to mind.

I vote the ladder must be at least 6 inches wider at the base than at the top.

Also needs cat purchase rails along side the steps so he can sit down.

I know a place that sells aluminum affordably. I'll have fun designing this. My 12" can take a back seat since I've not yet figured out the mirror part.
 

#63 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 16 November 2018 - 12:33 PM

Actually, the ladder does not need to taper. Just the hand rails need to vere in to keep the user from tipping it when ground is not level. That or side feet need to fold out.


That ladder needs a shallower climb angle if one intends to defend facing downward. I bet Jon could tip it backwards if he grabbed the rails and leaned away.

Also, the bottom step and last 2 feet of rails need bright paint or tape stripes so he can see the end in the dark. Each step needs a contrast leading edge. That is an immediate cheap modification he can make to the current ladder.

Any steps made need grip.

There maybe should be two rails, top and mid height, if he is to sit.

One reason not to redo the existing ladder is it could mean no ladder for a few weeks. Best to make a second one.

Edited by stargazer193857, 17 November 2018 - 12:31 PM.

 

#64 starzonesteve

starzonesteve

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 547
  • Joined: 17 May 2014

Posted 16 November 2018 - 06:53 PM

Actually, the ladder does not need to taper. Just the hand rails need to vere in to keep the user from tipping it when ground is not level.

Making this should be easy.

That ladder needs a shallower climb angle. I bet Jon could tip it backwards if I grabbed the rails and leaned backward.

Also, the bottom step and last 2 feet of rails need bright paint or tape stripes so he can see the end in the dark. Each step needs a contrast leading edge.

Steps are easy to make from angle bar. They need grip though.

There should be too rails, top and mid height.

One reason not to redo the existing ladder is it could mean no ladder for a few weeks.

Go for it!

 

In dreams begin responsibilities...


 

#65 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5202
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 17 November 2018 - 10:58 AM

A ladder isn't the only issue.  The whole design is just bigger and heavier.  Deep mirror box, thick wood construction, thick mirror, long trusses, substantial UTA. …...

From the late 1980's to maybe 7 to 10 years ago anything else other than 'the classic design' was a "compromise" that resulted in lesser performance. Modern makers - and ATMs - have finally stepped up and are making physically smaller and lighter premium Dobs that don't give up much if anything in performance. As a side benefit - they have a very cool look to them!

 

Of course it will cost you. The used Obsession 20 F/5 in question, once set up, will almost certainly perform as well as any (yes I know about the 2" thick mirror's cooling issues) - will cost maybe 40% of a new 20-inch F/3.x, and can be had right now - not a year from now. I'm sure that someone will want it and will put it out under the stars.


 

#66 George N

George N

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5202
  • Joined: 19 May 2006
  • Loc: Binghamton & Indian Lake NY

Posted 17 November 2018 - 11:08 AM

Dang! After reading this thread I think we need a geriatric forum!smile.gif …...

 

Mike Spooner

 

Probably!  blush.gif

 

I just read in the Sept issue of 'The Reflector' that the Astronomical League's largest Region just completed a questionnaire of its 1,600+ members and found: 81% male, 56% over age 50 (a third over 65), 51% retired. only 5% interested in a 20-inch classic-design Dob.

 

          (OK the last part was not on the questionnaire - but the other figures make it more likely than not. )

 

BTW, the AL Region concluded that it needed to make changes to accommodate this demographic. They did not detail the 'changes'.


Edited by George N, 17 November 2018 - 11:09 AM.

 

#67 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 76049
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 18 November 2018 - 04:35 AM

Actually, the ladder does not need to taper. Just the hand rails need to vere in to keep the user from tipping it when ground is not level. That or side feet need to fold out.

 

 

One does not use a scope like this on ground that is not flat . The stability of my current ladder comes from the 2 wheels under the tall part of the scope being on an axle that extends beyond the rest of the ladder,  giving it a wider base. 

 

At the other end,  there are clearance issues with the rocker box . The ladder needs to be  close to the scope to minimize the distance to the eyepiece and finders .

 

Jon


 

#68 Kunama

Kunama

    Aussie at large

  • *****
  • Posts: 4455
  • Joined: 22 Oct 2012
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 18 November 2018 - 05:47 PM

My solution was to take the treads from one ladder and add the to an identical one, then fashion a seat from some nice marine ply.

Seat can be fitted between any of the treads......  This worked fine for an 18" F5.5  (101.5")

Attached Thumbnails

  • MIS_4175.jpg
  • MIS_4176.jpg

 

#69 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 18 November 2018 - 11:45 PM

My solution was to take the treads from one ladder and add the to an identical one, then fashion a seat from some nice marine ply.
Seat can be fitted between any of the treads...... This worked fine for an 18" F5.5 (101.5")

Yeah! We have a tinkerer to the rescue.
I wonder if the rear leg should be trimmed and reholed up top to get a shallower angle.
Looking at those steps, I wonder why it did not come that way.

What is the height change between steps, and how wide are they across?

Edited by stargazer193857, 19 November 2018 - 09:02 AM.

 

#70 sn1987a

sn1987a

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 241
  • Joined: 26 Sep 2010
  • Loc: Western Australia

Posted 19 November 2018 - 12:52 AM

Hardcore extreme Dobsonianing ladder. tongue2.gif

 

Second hand from some guy on Gumtree,

One of the two folding middle locking braces removed to enable walk in easy standing underneath no bending pickup,

Holes drilled in all side pieces to reduce weight by several kg,

2" holes drilled in top steps for eyepieces and paracorr.

Attached Thumbnails

  • extreme ladder.jpg

Edited by sn1987a, 19 November 2018 - 03:18 AM.

 

#71 Shneor

Shneor

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1715
  • Joined: 01 Mar 2005
  • Loc: Northern California

Posted 19 November 2018 - 02:45 AM

Hardcore extreme Dobsonianing ladder. tongue2.gif

 

Second hand from some guy on Gumtree,

One of the folding middle struts removed to enable easy standing underneath no bending pickup,

Holes drilled in all side pieces to reduce weight by several kg,

2" holes drilled in top steps for eyepieces and paracorr.

My issue with this ladder is that the struts are way too narrow (at least for me) to stand on for any length of time. That's one of the reasons I like my Cosco  stepladder. whose steps are over 10" deep. But the step material is also important; I have another, similar, stepladder with steps as deep, but made of metal. It's just not comfortable to stand on for any length of time.


 

#72 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 19 November 2018 - 08:41 AM

...

One of the two folding middle locking braces removed to enable walk in easy standing underneath no bending pickup,
...
2" holes drilled in top steps for eyepieces and paracorr.


Clever
 

#73 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7129
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 19 November 2018 - 08:45 AM

My issue with this ladder is that the struts are way too narrow (at least for me) to stand on for any length of time. That's one of the reasons I like my Cosco stepladder. whose steps are over 10" deep. But the step material is also important; I have another, similar, stepladder with steps as deep, but made of metal. It's just not comfortable to stand on for any length of time.

Good points. What depth do you think is the minimum needed for comfort?
Do you mean rubber strops are good? Deep soft rubber? Expanded holly metal?
Yeah, plain flat metal would be slippery too.


With staggered feet aimed 45 degrees to the side, would 8" steps be comfortable? I'm thinking the balls heal base and toe base, not toe tips, are the most important part to support.

Edited by stargazer193857, 19 November 2018 - 08:59 AM.

 

#74 opticsguy

opticsguy

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1745
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Washington State

Posted 19 November 2018 - 11:04 AM

Elvira   24"  f/2.75   The very perfect scope . . . . 


 

#75 starcanoe

starcanoe

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2439
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Gulf Coast, Panhandle of Florida

Posted 19 November 2018 - 04:57 PM

Thats a helpful post....short of money? Win Publishers Clearing House....


 


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics