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How to make the most of parallelogram mounts?

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#1 joelin

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 12:12 PM

I just got a parallelogram mount for Celestron 15×70 binocular. I also have a recliner that allows me to get underneath it and have proper neck support. This mount has 4 degrees of motion.

1) The challenge is that that when I do this I don’t have much range of motion to move the binocular to somewhere else. I can go slightly higher and slightly lower, not much laterally. It’s also difficult to see what I’m pointing out in the sky because the objective lenses so close to my eyes.

2) It’s also difficult to see when I’m pointing at in the sky because the objective lens is so close to my eyes. I should try to install a red dot finder. How would I do that with the Celestron 15x70?


3) It is also difficult too figure out how to share views with other people because I must move the binocular to get out of the recliner.

Any suggestions for how to deal with the above problems?

#2 Barlowbill

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 12:32 PM

Celestron advertizes that bino with a tripod.  The tripod has a rail to mount a red dot finder.  I do not believe that bino's weight is enough to warrant a parallelogram mount.  



#3 havasman

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 12:50 PM

I use a parallelogram mount with my 10x50's and like it very much. It works much better for me than the tripod mount did because of the increased degrees of motion it allows. The key for me was putting it on a sturdy tripod with adequate height range. I use a regular variable height observing chair or stand when using the binos. It sounds to me like the OP's chair is limiting his ability to move as the binoculars do. My chair is light and compact and it gets moved around to observe different objects as it does with the scopes.


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#4 Rich V.

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 12:59 PM

P-grams can be difficult to use from a seated position if they don't have the fifth "swing hinge" axis of motion at the end of the arms.  The area of sky can be quite limited without that feature.  You don't say which p-gram you have...

 

If you plan to share views, I'd suggest you extend the tripod higher and view from a standing position where the others can walk right up to the binos.  While this may be harder on the viewer's necks, having the tripod out of the way still makes viewing easier than a typical tripod/head combo.  I use a recliner with my Unimount but not for sharing views.

 

Practice will help you with your aiming problems; a 4+ degree FOV isn't all that narrow and you will likely improve your aiming over time.  A red dot finder could be helpful but you'll have to devise some type of clamp for attachment.  Here are a few ideas:

 

https://www.cloudyni...-finder-advice/

 

Rich



#5 Allanbarth1

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 01:21 PM

I made a diy p-gram for when using my Skymaster 15x70's. Made a bracket just like what Rich V. shows he made, you can see his in post #7 on the link he posted. I mounted a red dot finder to it and it works quite well for me.

 

As for as the issue you explained with viewing seated. One of the things I see many do is to make a ground board for both the chair and p-gram. Just look up bino chair here on CN or on the web and you'll see what I mean. 



#6 joelin

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 01:56 PM

I have the UniMount from Universal Astronomics: http://www.universal...htPictures.html



#7 25585

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 02:21 PM

Mine is the Ukrainian p-mount, heavy and strong. It's like a Meccanno set. I can use home made scaled dials similar to alt azi ones on the pivot points to note position of an object.



#8 joelin

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 02:22 PM

I made a diy p-gram for when using my Skymaster 15x70's. Made a bracket just like what Rich V. shows he made, you can see his in post #7 on the link he posted. I mounted a red dot finder to it and it works quite well for me.

 

As for as the issue you explained with viewing seated. One of the things I see many do is to make a ground board for both the chair and p-gram. Just look up bino chair here on CN or on the web and you'll see what I mean. 

Is this a ground board? 

 

http://dslrmodificat...binochair1.html

 

So the entire chair and p-gram is on the board and the board is rotating? this looks quite sophisticated as you need a battery and something that can carry a load!



#9 Allanbarth1

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Posted 09 November 2018 - 03:17 PM

Yes that's the general idea. There are quite a few variations of it though. If you search here I know a few members have made all sorts of bono chairs. Maybe you can make something that is similar to a Dob base, mount your recliner and P-gram to the board and turn/steer using your feet. The thing is you need some sort of bearing capable to both carry the weight of the chair, you, and the p-gram. Maybe some sort of roller setup like what an observatory dome rotates on with a cleverly assembled rope and pulley system to turn the entire ground board setup, i.e. the board, chair, observer and p-gram. Just putting out what quickly pops into my head.

 

There are a bunch of designs out there. Just need to find what will work for you if that the direction you want to go. 



#10 joelin

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 05:51 PM

I'm wondering if this:

 

https://agenaastro.c...ar-bracket.html

 

will work with the Skymaster 15x70 and a red dot finder such as this

 

https://www.bhphotov...html?ap=y&smp=y



#11 S.Boerner

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Posted 12 November 2018 - 08:27 PM

Did your Skymaster 15x70s come with a tripod adapter?  If so you should be able to cobble something together with an angle bracket (see: https://images.homed...-10-64_1000.jpg)   Remove the bolt that would hold the binos, insert the bracket, and replace the bolt.  If you are lucky you'll still have enough threads to hold the binos.  If not you can probably find a longer bolt to do the job.  The above RDF can easily mount to the top with a mounting plate.


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#12 Allanbarth1

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Posted 13 November 2018 - 02:11 PM

I just cut a piece of aluminum angle for my red dot finder, Drilled a mounting hole for the attachment of the bracket to the binos and the stock bino mount. I did need a ever so slightly longer screw but I had one on hand to fit. 

 

The bracket your showing us looks as if it should work, but key word is should. I see no reason why it wouldn't work for you. The only issue that you might have is the bracket flexing and twisting. It says it's made from stainless steel but looks a bit thin. I have found that to keep bonod solid and still when observing you need a rather beefy mounting bracket. The plastic stock bracket that came with my SkyMaster 15x70's twisted all over the place and was useless. It was to thin in the middle. You couldn't touch anything at all or it would take forever to stop shaking. I tried different tripods and even on my p-gram but the bracket IS the weak link.

 

I did a very simple fix to the stock bracket the came with my SkyMasters. I went to the big box store and got this stuff. Easy to need together and smoosh it into the sides of the bracket. Just keep this stuff away from the brass mounting insert so it doesn't interfere with mounting the bino's to the bracket. Now my binos ar rock solid on any tripod I put them on if they are not on the p-gram.

 

I don't know if this is a concern of yours or the reason your interested in the bracket. If so it's a very easy and inexpensive fix for you. 

 

( If you or anyone uses this stuff it is rated for use on plastic. It says on the package "Bonds to virtually any surface including metal, wood and plastic" and I put it on my bracket 2+ years ago and it's still as good as when I first did it. Once it's needed together you need to squish in the cavity along both sides rather quickly. Once this stuff begins to get warm and shows the slightest sign of hardening, it excellerates hardening quickly. Just mix about a quarter size and work it in. Then repeat. )


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