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14 November Lunar Apogee, Comparison with 31 October Perigee

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#1 Tom Glenn

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 03:37 AM

Here is tonight's Moon, taken under poor conditions.  This image was taken about 12 hours before lunar apogee, and the interesting comparison here is with the image I took on October 31, which was within several hours of lunar perigee.  Of additional interest is that the perigee that occurred on 31 October was the furthest perigee of the year, at just over 370,000km.  Most lunar perigees occur at distances closer than this, with some falling under 360,000km.  When a perigee occurs near a Quarter Moon (either first or last), that perigee is at a maximum distance due to the reduced eccentricity of the Moon's orbit when the line of apsides is perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line.  Conversely, when a perigee occurs at a New or Full Moon, this corresponds with increased eccentricity of the orbit and the Earth-Moon distance is therefore at a minimum (these are "Supermoons").  

 

Moon_111418_TG.jpg

 

Apogee_Perigee_OctNov_TG.jpg


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#2 Kutno

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 09:39 PM

Nice comparison!  You've created a nice series of photos for folks like me to peruse.  



#3 Joe Eiers

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 03:56 AM

That's really cool.  Thanks for posting that!

Joe



#4 Tom Glenn

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 11:52 PM

Thanks for the comments Kutno and Joe.  Part of my interest in the Moon is that there is never a dull moment, and there are always interesting measurements or observations that can be made (not new ones of course, as most observations about orbital characteristics of the Moon are hundreds of years old, but it's fun enough to keep me entertained!).  


Edited by Tom Glenn, 16 November 2018 - 11:54 PM.

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#5 aeroman4907

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 09:46 AM

Nice work Tom.  Just noticed you were posting quite a bit in another forum.  I enjoy your enthusiasm for the moon.  When I was a kid with a 60mm scope I could care less about the moon.  Now I am fascinated with it.  Go figure.



#6 Tom Glenn

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 11:21 PM

Nice work Tom.  Just noticed you were posting quite a bit in another forum.  I enjoy your enthusiasm for the moon.  When I was a kid with a 60mm scope I could care less about the moon.  Now I am fascinated with it.  Go figure.

Thanks Aeroman.  I've always liked the Moon, but never really knew much about it as a kid, so I've been making up for lost time.  




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