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SkySafari Double Star Observing Lists From Burnham’s Celestial Handbook Available for All 88 Constellations

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#1 Rustler46

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 09:27 PM

SkySafari double star observing lists assembled from Burnham’s Celestial Handbook, are now available for download for any of the 88 constellations. To download an individual observing list, follow these steps:

  1. Obtain a LiveSky.com account - their free version works fine.
  2. Log in to your account.
  3. From the list below, click on the constellation name, which loads a web page that will facilitate the download.
  4. On that page click on the download icon to the right of the constellation name.
  5. Choose the file format to download. This will initiate downloading the constellation’s double star observing list.
  6. Import the list into your copy SkySafari.

Notes:

  • There are a few instances where stars in an observing list are now actually in an adjacent constellation. This is because in such a case precession has changed the coordinates of the pair to move it across the constellation boundary. There is at least one instance that, even allowing for precession, a double star is just shown in the wrong constellation in Burnham’s list. But for consistency these doubles have been left in the same constellation as shown in Burnham's Celestial Handbook.
  • There will also be a some outright errors in the entries in these lists. Feel free to correct these in your own copy of the list.  With these errors it would also be helpful if you can inform via private message, so correction can be made.

These SkySafari double star observing lists were assembled with the intent they would add to your enjoyment in observing these interesting celestial objects. Clear Skies! smile.gif

 

 

Total = 5,261 doubles

 

The following table of double star catalog equivalents may be of use.

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-23 at 6.45.29 PM.png

 

Also the list found in the following Cloudy Nights thread is useful.

 

Catalog Names


Edited by Rustler46, 23 November 2018 - 10:50 PM.

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#2 RadioAstronomer

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Posted 23 November 2018 - 10:36 PM

Thank you Russ!



#3 GaryJCarter

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 02:46 PM

Thanks Russ.

I have noted that importing these into SkySafari Pro 6, several lists show one item less than the number indicated in your link. Auriga Doubles From Burnham’s Celestial Handbook, for example, shows to have 122 doubles, but the imported list only contains 121 doubles. (I deleted Auriga and re-imported it thinking maybe a correction had been made, but the end result was still 121 objects. I decided not to delete and re-import the others until the issue is understood).

I'll have to check the LiveSky list against what is imported.... I might be able to determine the root cause comparing them.

Regards,

Edited by GaryJCarter, 24 November 2018 - 02:48 PM.


#4 Rustler46

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 03:57 PM

Thanks Russ.

I have noted that importing these into SkySafari Pro 6, several lists show one item less than the number indicated in your link. Auriga Doubles From Burnham’s Celestial Handbook, for example, shows to have 122 doubles, but the imported list only contains 121 doubles. (I deleted Auriga and re-imported it thinking maybe a correction had been made, but the end result was still 121 objects. I decided not to delete and re-import the others until the issue is understood).

I'll have to check the LiveSky list against what is imported.... I might be able to determine the root cause comparing them.

Regards,

Hi Gary,

Thanks for the comment. That is strange the numbers not matching for some of the constellations. My own copy of the Auriga list has 122 entries. When I download the list from Livesky as a CSV (comma separated variable) format it has entries for 122. There must be some kind of glitch in how LiveSky.com or SkySafari handles the process. But it is beyond me to know why it happens or how to fix the problem. When I get an opportunity, I'll contact Simulation Curriculum and report the bug.

 

Another issue is that the shared observing lists use HD numbers rather than the double star designations that are in my copy of the lists. I've made request to the software engineers at Simulation Curriculum for that to be corrected. We'll see. In the meantime we'll just have to make do with how it currently works.

 

Best Regards,

Russ



#5 GaryJCarter

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 04:08 PM

Russ,

That they are using HD identifiers may be the culprit...I have located two identical entries for Auriga in LiveSky: entrues #38 and #39.

Whatever your original double star designations were, it appears they both were re-mapped to the same HD 35961 in LiveSky. When imported to SkySafari this duplication is ignored.

Corona Borealis, the original double star entries #8 & #9 were both mapped to HD 139691

Sagitta, the original double star entries #19 & #20 were both mapped to HD 354615

Cepheus is not an obvious duplication...there must be two different identifiers in the source data that map to a common object in SkySafari.

Regards,

Edited by GaryJCarter, 24 November 2018 - 05:03 PM.


#6 Rustler46

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 05:28 PM

Russ,

That they are using HD identifiers may be the culprit...I have located two identical entries for Auriga in LiveSky: entrues #38 and #39.

Whatever your original double star designations were, it appears they both were re-mapped to the same HD 35961 in LiveSky. When imported to SkySafari this duplication is ignored.

Corona Borealis, the original double star entries #8 & #9 were both mapped to HD 139691

Sagitta, the original double star entries #19 & #20 were both mapped to HD 354615

Cepheus is not an obvious duplication...there must be two different identifiers in the source data that map to a common object in SkySafari.

Regards,

Hi Gary, 

You have found the culprit. The problem is with an error in SkySafari misidentifying two different doubles as having the same HD35961. In my copy of the Auriga observing list Struve 715 and Struve 711 (#38 & #39) both have that HD number. They have different ADS and WDS numbers, but it's the same for HD numbers. When these two are mapped by their HD numbers the program sees them as the same object. 

 

I just wish that the double star designations were used. The shared lists would be much more useful. In my lists most of the entries are identified by the double star catalog number that I used in the search. A smaller number of entries use HD or SAO numbers.

By the way the culprits in the other lists are:

  • Corona Borealis - Struve 1964 & Hussey 1167
  • Sagitta - the same Struve 2622 is in there twice (once as HD354615). Usually when that happened, SkySafari would say that one is already on the list and not add a second entry. So that one I can correct in my original list.

 

I'm amazed that you were able to identify the source of the problem, Gary. SkySafari isn't perfect. But nothing is. 

 

Edit:

Later in the day I had time to investigate the situation with the observing list for Sagitta. I found some interesting things about how SkySafari identifies double stars. And yes, it is connected with SkySafari using HD numbers for the lists. There were instances where the program database has the same double listed twice with different HD numbers:

  1. BU 139 has 2 entries with HD179558 and HD179588
  2. BU 149 has 2 entries with HD189183 and HD354302

The 3rd duplicate entry in the observing list was harder to fathom. This was for the pair in Burnham's list shown as 13341 (with no catalog Identifier). In SkySafari for the same pair there were 2 entries on the list identified as follows:

  • STF 2622, also carrying ADS 13341 and HD 354615
  • HD 354615, also carrying the ADS 13341 and STF 2622

So in this case the duplicated pair has the same HD. So I'm not sure why it ended up being on the list twice. In any case I deleted the duplicate entry for each of these instances. Strangely when I did this the program put the extra entry right back in the list. But deleting the duplicate entry the second time removed it permanently. 

 

I don't know how much all of this is of use to those downloading these observing lists, since yours are identified mostly by HD numbers. In any case after edits my observing list for Sagitta now has 16 entries. Struve 2651 was removed from the list because of not being in Burnham's book. It's an interesting pair, but for consistency it has been removed. The following is a link to the new list:

On my copy of the list these are shown with the following identifiers:

  1. Struve 2437
  2. Herschel 2851
  3. Burnham 139
  4. Struve 2484
  5. Struve 2504
  6. Struve 375
  7. Epsilon Sagittae
  8. Jonckheere 138
  9. HD185418 — (shown in Burnham's book as Jonckheere 139)
  10. V340 Sagittae — (shown in Burnham's book as HN 84)
  11. Zeta Sagittae
  12. Burnham 149
  13. Struve 2622 — (shown in Burnham's book as 13341, which is an ADS number)
  14. Struve 2631
  15. Struve 2634
  16. Theta Sagittae

The downloaded list has a mixture of HD, variable star, Greek letter and SAO numbers. I would expect the lists will display few double star catalog identifiers, unless Simulation Curriculum modifies the program. Of course any entry on the list when selected can have that object's information page displayed, showing the double star identifiers and allowing for go-to acquisition. It would just be much handier if the double star identifier was displayed on the list, not HD or other less useful numbers.

 

I suspect that there will be other glitches like the ones is Sagitta. I don't know if this is a common occurrence correlating double stars found in different catalogs. Still SkySafari is a wonderful tool for many purposes. But it does fall short in this area of forming observing lists via the search function and sharing these lists via LiveSky.

 

But after adding over 5000 pairs to the 88 observing lists, for the most part, I'll not be attempting to correct errors such as the ones found in the Sagitta list. I'll leave that to users of these lists. I'm hoping the error rate will prove to be low, and that the lists will still be useful for observing these objects.

 

All the Best,

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 25 November 2018 - 04:21 AM.


#7 Cotts

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 11:58 AM

Russ, you deserve a plaque and a gold watch for this work.

 

Dave


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#8 Rustler46

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 12:15 PM

Russ, you deserve a plaque and a gold watch for this work.

 

Dave

Thanks, Dave.

 

It was a lot of work, but quite fun. I just hope there aren't too many errors, and that the lists will prove useful.

 

Best Regards,

Russ



#9 Rustler46

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 09:13 PM

Russ,

That they are using HD identifiers may be the culprit...I have located two identical entries for Auriga in LiveSky: entrues #38 and #39.

Whatever your original double star designations were, it appears they both were re-mapped to the same HD 35961 in LiveSky. When imported to SkySafari this duplication is ignored.

Corona Borealis, the original double star entries #8 & #9 were both mapped to HD 139691

Sagitta, the original double star entries #19 & #20 were both mapped to HD 354615

Cepheus is not an obvious duplication...there must be two different identifiers in the source data that map to a common object in SkySafari.

Regards,

Hi Gary,

 In Cepheus the duplicate entries are #108 & #109.

 

Question:

Are there any other suspect lists where the numbers claimed and numbers downloaded don't match?

 

It might be easier for me to catch the duplicates due to the way the pairs in my list are identified. In Cepheus the two were shown in my list as:

  • ​Struve 484
  • HD 217085

The LiveSky list shows:

  • HD 217085
  • HD 217085

So far the lists where you have seen problems are among the earlier lists I assembled. Later I began to keep a running total of double stars on each list as it was assembled. So if I added a double star but the total went up by two, it alerted me to this kind of problem. In some cases SkySafari would do that double entry maneuver, which would need an editing adjustment like we have been doing.

 

Russ



#10 GaryJCarter

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 02:01 AM

Hi Gary,
 In Cepheus the duplicate entries are #108 & #109.
 
Question:
Are there any other suspect lists where the numbers claimed and numbers downloaded don't match?
 
It might be easier for me to catch the duplicates due to the way the pairs in my list are identified. In Cepheus the two were shown in my list as:

  • ​Struve 484
  • HD 217085
The LiveSky list shows:
  • HD 217085
  • HD 217085
So far the lists where you have seen problems are among the earlier lists I assembled. Later I began to keep a running total of double stars on each list as it was assembled. So if I added a double star but the total went up by two, it alerted me to this kind of problem. In some cases SkySafari would do that double entry maneuver, which would need an editing adjustment like we have been doing.
 
Russ


Corrected at 1:40am

Russ,

I had trouble following the Cepheus explanation. I didn't see the duplicate entry in LiveSky for HD 217085 depicted above. What I saw in LiveSky was the following:

...
108 Double Star HD 217085
109 Multiple Star HD 217294
...

So I queried these stars directly using SkySafari.

HD 217085 is a doublestar in Cepheus. The other identifiers included SAO 10560, BD +72 1076, HIP 113273, STT 484, ADS 16384, WDS 22562+7250, and TYC 4485-0844-1. Note this star does have a Struve identifier STT 484.

I then queried SkySafari for all Struve stars and located an entry for "Struve 484". It showed up as a double star in Camelopardalis. The identifiers included Struve 484, ADS 2984, WDS 04078+6220, TYC 4068-1656-1 (No HD identifier was listed)

I then queried "Struve 484". SkySafari listed two entries, one in Cepheus, the other in Camelopardalis. The one in Cepheus linked to the identifier HD 217085 (above).

So it seems we have a duplicate entry in the SkySafari database for Struve 484 that indicates it is associated with a double star in Cepheus and a double star in Camelopardalis!

How is this possible? An excerpt from an article Bill Pellerin wrote for the Astronomical League on this very subject helps to explain:

https://www.astrolea...nd-double-stars

This stated, one must be careful when mapping double stars given "Struve 123" does not uniquely identify a Struve double star! STT and STF identifiers must be utilized.


A query of HD 217294 links it to two co-located stars, both linked to STF 2791, so all appears normal there.

Those were the only datasets that had a mismatch in counts. I'll let you know if I find any others.

Regards,
-Gary

Edited by GaryJCarter, 26 November 2018 - 03:26 AM.


#11 Rustler46

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 02:59 AM

Russ,

I had trouble following the Cepheus explanation. I didn't see the duplicate entry in LiveSky for HD 217085 depicted above. What I saw in LiveSky was the following:

...
108 Double Star HD 217085
109 Multiple Star HD 217294
...

So I queried these stars directly using SkySafari.

HD 217085 is a doublestar in Cepheus. The other identifiers included SAO 10560, BD +72 1076, HIP 113273, STT 484, ADS 16384, WDS 22562+7250, and TYC 4485-0844-1. It does *not* show it to have a corresponding Struve identifier.

I then queried SkySafari for all Struve stars and located an entry for Struve 484. It showed up as a double star in Camelopardalis, and this is the correct constellation for Struve 484. The identifiers included Struve 484, ADS 2984, WDS 04078+6220, TYC 4068-1656-1 (No HD identifier was listed)

I then queried Struve 484. SkySafari listed two entries, one in Cepheus, the other in Camelopardalis. The one in Cepheus linked to the identifier HD 217085 (above)

So it seems we have an erroneous, duplicate entry in the SkySafari database for Struve 484 that indicates it is associated with a double star in Cepheus.

A query of HD 217294 links it to two co-located stars, both linked to Struve 2791, so all appears normal there.

Those were the only datasets that had a mismatch in counts. I'll let you know if I find any others.

Regards,
-Gary

Hi Gary,

 

Thanks for looking into this situation. I'm wondering if we have the same databases in our versions of SkySafari. My version is 6 Pro, Ver 6.2.2.0. But until I deleted the extra entry for Struve 484 (the one with HD217085 on the list display) I had 126 entries in Cepheus. I deleted the HD217085 entry (had to do it twice before it stayed gone). Then when I logged in to LiveSky it showed 125 entries. And entry  as as follows

  • #108 - HD217085, which is Struve 484
  • #109 - HD217294, which is Struve 2971

Entry #109 is the correct next entry on my list, after deleting the second HD217085  (AKA Struve 484). So my question is does your list show 125 or 126 entries?

 

I'm confused by your statement:

 

"HD 217085 is a doublestar in Cepheus. The other identifiers included SAO 10560, BD +72 1076, HIP 113273, STT 484, ADS 16384, WDS 22562+7250, and TYC 4485-0844-1. It does *not* show it to have a corresponding Struve identifier."

 

Are you aware that STT 484 (bold above) is the designation for Otto Struve's catalog? Burnham's handbook shows this one as OΣ484. SkySafari shows entries in catalogs by Otto Struve and F.G.W.Struve as "Struve" (or STT and STF). So Struve 484 (STT484) is from Otto Struve's catalog.  I hope that clears up any confusion.

 

Gary, I've got to run since my wife just called with a flat tire. So I get back to you with more on this.

 

Edit (next day):

 

You’re right, Gary. The duplicate records for “Struve 484” being in Cepheus and Camelopardalis are two different pairs:

  • STF 484 (Camelopardalis) - WDS 04078+6220
  • STT 484 (Cepheus) - WDS 22562+7250

The difference is the STF or STT prefix. Usually in SkySafari the information page for a double star uses STF or STT as the catalog prefix. But for some reason for the pair in Camelopardalis it doesn’t show STF. It only identifies the pair as Struve 484, without indicating which Struve catalog. Live and learn.

 

So I think this clears up the reason why for Sagitta, Auriga and Cepheus the downloaded lists have one less double than expected. The lessor number is the correct one.

 

 

Best Regards,

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 26 November 2018 - 05:12 PM.


#12 GaryJCarter

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Posted 26 November 2018 - 03:11 AM

Russ,

I forgot about the multiple Struve family members having utlized different Struve identifiers and corrected my entry above.

Cepheus has 125 entries in SkySafariPro v6.2.2

Regards,
-Gary

Edited by GaryJCarter, 26 November 2018 - 03:45 AM.


#13 Rustler46

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 08:43 PM

Russ,

I forgot about the multiple Struve family members having utlized different Struve identifiers and corrected my entry above.

Cepheus has 125 entries in SkySafariPro v6.2.2

Regards,
-Gary

Thanks for the feedback, Gary. Looking at the list of your optics, which of these do you use for most of your double star observing? You have a lot excellent telescopes to choose from. I enjoy the comparison of views between my C-11 and AT115EDT refractor (see post #120 in the link). For doubles that aren't too close or faint, I prefer the view through the little 4-1/2 inch refractor. But for the fainter or closer pairs sometimes the C-11 comes to the rescue.


Edited by Rustler46, 15 December 2018 - 08:46 PM.


#14 GaryJCarter

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 01:01 AM

Russ,

The C-11 is typically paired with the TV85, the latter giving me the widefield "finder" view for the larger light bucket with a narrower TFOV. I have not thought of piggybacking the SW120ED and comparing the views...I will need to try this experiment.

The AP178 has been my workhorse instrument. I truly enjoy using that OTA for observing double stars. I'll setup the TV102 on evenings I am chasing a break in the weather for an impromptu observing session. The SW120 is a very good performer too, but not used as often as the other two refractors for double stars.
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#15 Rustler46

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 11:26 PM

An excerpt from an article Bill Pellerin wrote for the Astronomical League on this very subject helps to explain:

https://www.astrolea...nd-double-stars

 

I found that selecting the link above gave a web page with a useful writeup on The Struve Family and Double Stars. Unfortunately there are a lot of formatting hieroglyphics cluttering up the intended text. I took the initiative and did my best at cleaning it up to make it more readable. This is what resulted:

 

The Struve Family and Double Stars
Submitted by Anonymous on Thu Sep 6, 2012

By Bill Pellerin
Houston Astronomical Society

 

Amateur astronomy can get confusing and for lots of reasons. Keeping up with who discovered what, how he or she named it, what it really is, and whether you can observe or image it is enough to make your head spin. So it is with the Struve family and the double stars that carry their name.

 

The Struve family had a lot of family members involved in astronomy for several generations from (1755 to 1992). Trying to sort through all the accomplishments of this family can be a challenge, so to keep it manageable we’ll focus on their work cataloging double stars. There are two members of the family we normally associate with double stars, Friedrich Georg Wilhelm (von) Struve (1793-1864) and Otto Wilhelm Struve (1819-1905), the son of FGW Struve.

 

FGW Struve lived in Europe his entire life and became a professor of astronomy at what was then known as Dorpat University in Estonia. While there he measured the position of double stars with a micrometer and published his Catalog of New Double Stars in 1827. Otto Wilhelm Struve was the head of the Pulkovo Observatory (Russia) until 1889. Otto continued the work of his father and has his own catalog of double stars — smaller than his father.

 

These are the Struve family members most associated with double stars. It is worth noting that a grandson of Otto Wilhelm Struve, also named Otto Struve (they named him Otto to confuse us) lived from 1897-1963 and was the director of the Yerkes Observatory in Wisconsin and the McDonald Observatory in Texas. His PhD work was on spectroscopic double stars and was done at the University of Chicago. He does not appear to be a significant cataloger of double stars, however.

 

How to Find These Stars

Six of the stars in the Astronomical League’s Double Star observing club have the designation Struve attached to them. Five are connected to the elder Struve and one is associated with Otto Struve. This is an excellent observing program. The objects are generally easy to see and often visually stunning. I completed the list in 1999, and I highly recommend it.

 

Here’s where observing the Struve stars can get complicated. The FGW Struve catalog of double stars is often designated with a sigma (Greek character Σ) and then a number (example: Σ2470), but not always. The Otto Struve catalog double stars have the letter O, then the sigma character and then a number (example: OΣ123).

 

The famous Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) identifies double stars as WDS. So, for the double star we’ve been using as an example (Σ2470), the WDS designation is WDS19088+3446, which means the star is at RA 19 deg 08.8 min / Dec +34 degrees 46 min. Since that double star was cataloged by Fredrich Georg Wilhelm Struve, the three-letter-identifier of the discoverer in the WDS catalog is STF (remember Struve The Father). You can find this star pair in the WDS catalog by looking for the text STF2470.

 

A double star in the WDS catalog that was discovered and cataloged by Otto Struve uses the identifier STT in the discoverer column followed by the Otto Struve catalog number. You can import the catalog into a spreadsheet, parse the rows, and filter the list to see only the WDS stars that were discovered by STF or STT. Or, you can search the list for your star pair of interest using a search string such as STF2470.

 

When you filter the WDS catalog, you’ll find that 4394 double stars in the WDS catalog were discovered by FGW Struve and 996 star pairs in the catalog credit Otto Struve as the discoverer. (Note that the full WDS catalog has 118,444 entries.)

 

In The Sky (Software Bisque) you can find the FGW Struve stars as Struve 2470 or WDS STF2470 and the Otto Struve stars as WDS STT123. In SkyTools (Skyhound) the FGW Struve double stars are found using the STF2470 format and the Otto Struve double stars are found using the STT123 format.

 

Finally, here is an easy observing exercise for you - one which allows you to see a pair of FGW Struve’s double stars in the same field of view (I found this in the book A Year of the Stars by Fred Schaff). These stars make up another double-double (similar to Epsilon Lyr) in Lyra and are worth the effort to find. To find Struve 2470 / 2474 (also known as SAO 67870 and 67879) point your telescope at RA 19 h 08 m 56 sec and Dec 34 deg 40 min 36 sec — the approximate midpoint of the two star pairs. These stars are around 7th magnitude, so they are quite a bit dimmer than Epsilon Lyr.


Edited by Rustler46, 18 December 2018 - 02:42 PM.


#16 EastAnglian

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Posted 10 April 2019 - 01:07 PM

SkySafari double star observing lists assembled from Burnham’s Celestial Handbook, are now available for download for any of the 88 constellations. To download an individual observing list, follow these steps:

  1. Obtain a LiveSky.com account - their free version works fine.
  2. Log in to your account.
  3. From the list below, click on the constellation name, which loads a web page that will facilitate the download.
  4. On that page click on the download icon to the right of the constellation name.
  5. Choose the file format to download. This will initiate downloading the constellation’s double star observing list.
  6. Import the list into your copy SkySafari.

Notes:

  • There are a few instances where stars in an observing list are now actually in an adjacent constellation. This is because in such a case precession has changed the coordinates of the pair to move it across the constellation boundary. There is at least one instance that, even allowing for precession, a double star is just shown in the wrong constellation in Burnham’s list. But for consistency these doubles have been left in the same constellation as shown in Burnham's Celestial Handbook.
  • There will also be a some outright errors in the entries in these lists. Feel free to correct these in your own copy of the list.  With these errors it would also be helpful if you can inform via private message, so correction can be made.

These SkySafari double star observing lists were assembled with the intent they would add to your enjoyment in observing these interesting celestial objects. Clear Skies! smile.gif

 

 

Total = 5,261 doubles

 

The following table of double star catalog equivalents may be of use.

 

attachicon.gif Screen Shot 2018-11-23 at 6.45.29 PM.png

 

Also the list found in the following Cloudy Nights thread is useful.

 

Catalog Names

Hi Russ

This list looks beyond impressive, but I cant get it to work. I’m using ss6+ and followed your instructions; I created and verified a Livesky account, clicked on Lyra in your list which took me to the Livesky page. I hit the Download button and chose CSV, but on going to my downloads page (Firefox on iPad Pro) the file wasn’t there? I tried various other combinations of constellation and file type, but nothing worked. Am I doing something stupid or does your list no longer work please?

Max



#17 stevenrjanssens

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 01:21 AM

Hi Russ

This list looks beyond impressive, but I cant get it to work. I’m using ss6+ and followed your instructions; I created and verified a Livesky account, clicked on Lyra in your list which took me to the Livesky page. I hit the Download button and chose CSV, but on going to my downloads page (Firefox on iPad Pro) the file wasn’t there? I tried various other combinations of constellation and file type, but nothing worked. Am I doing something stupid or does your list no longer work please?

Max

Max, I don't know if there's a way to open these observing lists in SkySafari on the iPad itself. I downloaded these on my computer and then copied them to my device using iTunes file sharing. Once there they were then synced to all my devices.



#18 EastAnglian

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Posted 11 April 2019 - 03:03 AM

Max, I don't know if there's a way to open these observing lists in SkySafari on the iPad itself. I downloaded these on my computer and then copied them to my device using iTunes file sharing. Once there they were then synced to all my devices.

Hi Steve

Very many thanks for that, I thought perhaps I was going nuts! I’ll try that later today (hopefully) and report back. 

Max



#19 SpyderwerX

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Posted 13 April 2019 - 09:35 AM

Max, I don't know if there's a way to open these observing lists in SkySafari on the iPad itself. I downloaded these on my computer and then copied them to my device using iTunes file sharing. Once there they were then synced to all my devices.

 Basically the way it worked for me on the Android devices. I downloaded as a Skylist file to the PC, then I actually made a physical USB connection to the phone/device and copied them to directly the observing list directory within SS6Pro. Afterward everything synced up perfectly.



#20 Rustler46

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 05:28 AM

Hi Russ

This list looks beyond impressive, but I cant get it to work. I’m using ss6+ and followed your instructions; I created and verified a Livesky account, clicked on Lyra in your list which took me to the Livesky page. I hit the Download button and chose CSV, but on going to my downloads page (Firefox on iPad Pro) the file wasn’t there? I tried various other combinations of constellation and file type, but nothing worked. Am I doing something stupid or does your list no longer work please?

Max

Hi EastAnglian,

 

Since these observing lists were created on my own iPad, I've never needed to download them. But if memory serves me correctly, those who have been successful have used the Skylist format, not CSV. The latter I believe stands for coma separated variable. Such might be useful for importing into a spreadsheet. But maybe others can chime in here as to what has worked for them.

 

But just now in LiveSky when I choose either file format for download, shortly I see an icon moves up towards my download folder icon at the top of the screen. This is on a Mac computer. Not sure how this would happen on a PC or tablet. But both file types show up there in downloads. So the process still works. Once you locate where the dowloaded file goes, it must be opened. Then as I recall it then asks if you want to import it into SkySafari. But it has some time since I've helped any forum members through the process. So maybe looking through previous replies to this thread, or the LiveSky or SkySafari help pages would be useful. Again others might chime in with a better answer than I've given here. Hope it works for you.

 

Edit:

Another option is rather than "download" the list, choose "share" which is another button to the right of the download button. I'm not sure if this option is available on other user's Livesky accounts. But it shows up in mine. If you have that option, then use it to e-mail it to yourself.

 

Russ


Edited by Rustler46, 16 April 2019 - 05:46 AM.


#21 Ukrainian

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 11:46 AM

Really great topic, extremely useful, especially considering the fact that I just started the same work on Lyra and Cassiopea, then accidentally found this topic. Loaded to SS5Pro, thank you so much
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#22 Rustler46

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Posted 03 September 2019 - 04:17 AM

Really great topic, extremely useful, especially considering the fact that I just started the same work on Lyra and Cassiopea, then accidentally found this topic. Loaded to SS5Pro, thank you so much

Ukrainian, I do hope you enjoy the doubles from Kyiv! Give us a progress report on what you see.

 

Best Wishes for You,

Russ


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#23 Gary Riley

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 08:48 PM

Is the link to these constellations no longer working to add these to SS?

#24 Rustler46

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Posted 10 September 2019 - 11:05 PM

Is the link to these constellations no longer working to add these to SS?

Hi Gary,

I clicked on a few constellations and each sent me to a LiveSky page where that constellation could be downloaded. Which constellation did you try?

 

Regards,

Russ



#25 Gary Riley

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Posted 11 September 2019 - 10:44 PM

Hey Russ!
When I log into my Livesky account then come back to this page and click on one of the constellations, Cepheus for example, it takes me to a blank page. I’ve downloaded several constellations to my SS 6 Plus several months ago. So I thought I would try and download some more. Can’t seem to figure out what I am doing wrong.


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