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#1 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 01:30 AM

So I'm about 89% toward getting a Celestron Nexstar 5SE for a first go-to telescope.  To start with, I'm planning to get a mount/OTA carry case, tripod case, eyepiece case, Farpoint desiccants (including the dessicant focuser cap), Solar filter, dew shield, dew heater, and power supply (I already have a HelioPod Solar finder).  Later planning to add a reticle eyepiece, Barlows, SkySync GPS, DSLR camera/T-adapter/T-ring, a piggyback adapter, and then perhaps a Funstar (alas Starizona doesn't make a Hyperstar for the C5).  Much later might add a guidescope, astrowebcam, and perhaps a second faster OTA such as a short-tube refractor for deep-sky imaging on the 5SE mount (or I could just use a fast guidescope for imaging with a webcam, and then use the C5 with a reducer for guiding the guidescope).  I will have to add a finder shoe though to the OTA to add a guidescope.

 

I have seen some interesting posts on Cloudy Nights about the so-called C5 Freestar.  Apparently the C5 is the only OTA where it is fitted so that you can attach a camera directly in front, without needing a Funstar or a Hyperstar.  Obviously it gets even worse results than the Funstar, but it's free to use and might be fun to play with to see what comes out before investing in a Funstar.  How easy, safe, or practical is it to remove the secondary mirror on a C5?  Also, what are Bob knobs, and do I need to add them?

 

Anything else I should get?  Any other tips or tricks for the 5SE or the C5?  Are the Farpoint desiccants worth the expense?  Do I need to get a laser collimator?

 

I am well-aware of the limitations of the mount for long-exposure imaging and not really interested or willing to try anything over a minute or so at most in exposure time with the built-in wedge.  My primary interest in adding a guidescope to a C5 is actually for planetary video astronomy, to autoguide on planets at high magnification, such as for the upcoming Mercury transit.  It should be noted that the mount itself is free, since the MSRP of the C5 alone is more than the MSRP of the 5SE.  So I can buy the 5SE for planetary imaging and still get a better mount in the future (such as an AVX or a Sirius) for deep-sky imaging, and will actually have saved money.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 01:37 AM.


#2 Spike13

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 04:28 AM

Please take my opinion with a grain of salt, but its based on my experience with the Nexstar line of scopes.

 

The Nexstar line of scopes have their strengths. They are decent beginner scopes that will work decent for visual use. They are small, compact, easy to setup and tear down, light and easy to move, and have a nice price point for getting into the hobby. 

 

While you can take pictures with them, they are not good imaging scopes. The alt-az mount while very nice for visual leaves a lot to be desired of imaging. Based on your questions, I am assuming that you are just starting your journey, a 1250 focal length with an F/10 aperture on an alt-az mount will make your first attempts to image a struggle. If your real goal is to create great images of DSO's, a small 70mm to 80mm triplet refractor on an EQ mount is a much easier path for learning the art of astrophotography.

 

For the accessories you are looking at, case for the OTA, eyepiece case, solar filter, dew prevention, and remote power for traveling to darker skies are great items that will add value to your experience with this setup. I would recommend starting with these and holding off on the other items you have listed until you have had an opportunity to get some experience with it.

 

Good luck and clear skies.


Edited by Spike13, 24 November 2018 - 04:30 AM.

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#3 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 05:16 AM

Please take my opinion with a grain of salt, but its based on my experience with the Nexstar line of scopes.

 

The Nexstar line of scopes have their strengths. They are decent beginner scopes that will work decent for visual use. They are small, compact, easy to setup and tear down, light and easy to move, and have a nice price point for getting into the hobby. 

 

While you can take pictures with them, they are not good imaging scopes. The alt-az mount while very nice for visual leaves a lot to be desired of imaging. Based on your questions, I am assuming that you are just starting your journey, a 1250 focal length with an F/10 aperture on an alt-az mount will make your first attempts to image a struggle. If your real goal is to create great images of DSO's, a small 70mm to 80mm triplet refractor on an EQ mount is a much easier path for learning the art of astrophotography.

 

For the accessories you are looking at, case for the OTA, eyepiece case, solar filter, dew prevention, and remote power for traveling to darker skies are great items that will add value to your experience with this setup. I would recommend starting with these and holding off on the other items you have listed until you have had an opportunity to get some experience with it.

 

Good luck and clear skies.

 

My goal for getting a 5SE is to have a quick-setup easy-to-use lightweight telescope for Solar-System imaging, primarily as a travel 'scope for transits and eclipses (where I may need to set up in a hurry at the last minute).  I think it will serve that purpose well.  It should be pretty good for planetary, Solar, and Lunar imaging, and out of all Celestron SCTs and MCTs, would provide the widest possible field of view in a Canon APS-C camera, which is important for full-disc Solar/Lunar imaging (the primary purpose of the telescope).

 

Any deep-sky imaging is a secondary consideration, and would be fun to try, but is not my primary goal and I will not be disappointed if any deep-sky images come out in very poor quality or not at all (I don't have high expectations for that).  I would like to keep the 5SE mount for travel during eclipses and transits, and then maybe in a few years could upgrade to a better mount if I decided I really wanted to do any better-quality deep-sky imaging or try longer exposures.  Piggybacking a telephoto lens on the 5SE wedge mount should be good though, and I have seen some nice results with this, as well as with an Orion ST80/CT80 on the 5SE wedge mount.

 

Even for short-exposure imaging and videos, weight is the biggest issue with that mount.  This is what I have added up so far:

 

6 lb.  C5

1.2 lb.  50-mm guidescope

1 lb.  C5 dew shield

0.999 lb.  DSLR camera

0.708 lb.  smartphone mount

0.5 lb.  1.25" Barlow lens

0.443 lb.  smartphone

0.313 lb.  32-mm eyepiece

0.2 lb.  C5 heating element

0.188 lb.  erect-image diagonal

0.188 lb.  1X red-dot finder

0.188 lb.  T-adapter

0.188 lb.  T-ring

0.154 lb.  uncooled astrowebcam

0.1 lb.  1.25" heating element

0.1 lb.  50-mm guidescope heating element

0.0313 lb.  1.25" filter

 

That adds up to 9.67 lb. for afocal astrophotography with a smartphone on a 32-mm eyepiece and a Barlow (I know a high-power eyepiece would weigh less, but I want to maintain the same eyerelief and apparent field of view).  A T-adapted DSLR camera would weigh less, at 9.39 lb. with a Barlow.  I can reduce the weight further by getting an interchangeable-lens mirrorless camera instead.  The payload capacity of the mount is 10 lb., so both setups are cutting it very close just for unguided planetary imaging in altazimuth mode.  I definitely would not want to risk an equatorial alignment when the payload is maxed out like that, so the built-in wedge may likely end up being unused with the C5.

 

Replacing the C5 with an AT60ED (3.25 lb.) though brings the weight down to a more reasonable 5.54 lb. with a 0.6X reducer/flattener and a 50-mm guidescope on the apo, using two lightweight uncooled astrowebcams instead of a DSLR.  5.54 lb. is only 55% capacity, so that would work out a lot better for an equatorial alignment.  I understand the spur gears of the drive and the difficulties with accurately polar aligning the mount will still not provide usable exposures of over a minute or so at most, and then only at short telephoto-like focal lengths.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 06:40 AM.


#4 Ford Prefect

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 06:16 AM

Also, what are Bob knobs, and do I need to add them?

 

Bob's knobs are little knobs that replace the collimating screws on the secondary mirror of the C5.

I have mounted the Bob's Knobs on my C5 and can recommend them.

 

Do you "need" them? No, you can collimate the telescope using a screwdriver.

But the knobs allow you to collimate on a star using your fingers (so, avoid to use a screwdriver NEAR the corrector plate, in the dark: I did not like it), are easy to use, and hold the collimation as well as the screws they replaced (I travelled with my C5 on a couple of star parties, and the collimation was still good after the travel).


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#5 Frank Otsuka

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 07:49 AM

Call me crazy.

 

I have used all the "wrong" gear for planetary photos. Mainly, a C5, a Vixen Porta II, and a Sony Nex5R. The key is, planets are brighter than you think. Set focus, set the planet on the leading edge of the frame, shoot 30 seconds of video (or more if you can, till the planet disappears). Go crazy on camera settings, since this is a learning moment.  Try filters. Stack video with freeware software.  Letting the planet cross the sensor also averages out dust motes (if you are not good at housekeeping).

 

Enjoy



#6 Frank Otsuka

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 08:11 AM

Also, try eyepiece projection (maybe 9mm to 15mm)  and try a Barlow lens (2x or 3x). See what works better with your rig. Learn as much as possible before heading down the road of upscaled (and expensive) gear.

 

Don't be too impatient on purchases. Except for Mars, you will have to wait till next year to make use of it anyway.



#7 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 08:21 AM

Call me crazy.

 

I have used all the "wrong" gear for planetary photos. Mainly, a C5, a Vixen Porta II, and a Sony Nex5R. The key is, planets are brighter than you think. Set focus, set the planet on the leading edge of the frame, shoot 30 seconds of video (or more if you can, till the planet disappears). Go crazy on camera settings, since this is a learning moment.  Try filters. Stack video with freeware software.  Letting the planet cross the sensor also averages out dust motes (if you are not good at housekeeping).

 

Enjoy

I am still going back and forth between a manual equatorial mount and a GOTO mount, but I think a GOTO fork mount will make my life a little bit easier for a telescope whose goal is fast and easy setup for lightweight travel.  And the Omni 127 costs way more than the 5SE.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 08:29 AM.


#8 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 08:23 AM

Also, try eyepiece projection (maybe 9mm to 15mm)  and try a Barlow lens (2x or 3x). See what works better with your rig. Learn as much as possible before heading down the road of upscaled (and expensive) gear.

 

Don't be too impatient on purchases. Except for Mars, you will have to wait till next year to make use of it anyway.

 

The two big events coming up right now are Comet Wirtanen in mid-December (could be magnitude 4!!) and the January 2019 total Lunar eclipse (good practice for 2024).  If I can get a video of a total Lunar eclipse, and a photograph of a comet, that will be money well-spent.  I could actually get both of those with just a telephoto lens though probably.  What the telescope is really needed for is the November 2019 Mercury transit.  But anything outside the Solar System is just icing on the cake in my opinion.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 08:24 AM.


#9 Astrolite

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 08:50 AM

I'm visual only so most of what you are talking about is Greek to me, but I've been around a while. I must say you have certainly immersed yourself in the research of your endeavor. I am also aware that when the bug bites it is hard to hold back the urge to get absolutely everything you think you need, immediately.

 

The only piece of advice that I have to offer is to try to pace yourself a little, I would purchase just the scope and a few necessary accessories and master it from top to bottom before investing in everything you have listed. You never know the experience gained may take you in a totally different direction. It would be a shame to have invested in everything only to find out that you need to sell it all, at a loss, to take a different route.

 

You can take my advice with a grain of salt, you do seem rather committed, but I have seen it happen to enough people to know it is a possibility.

 

Good luck with your endeavor and clear skies.


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#10 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 09:38 AM

I'm visual only so most of what you are talking about is Greek to me, but I've been around a while. I must say you have certainly immersed yourself in the research of your endeavor. I am also aware that when the bug bites it is hard to hold back the urge to get absolutely everything you think you need, immediately.

 

The only piece of advice that I have to offer is to try to pace yourself a little, I would purchase just the scope and a few necessary accessories and master it from top to bottom before investing in everything you have listed. You never know the experience gained may take you in a totally different direction. It would be a shame to have invested in everything only to find out that you need to sell it all, at a loss, to take a different route.

 

You can take my advice with a grain of salt, you do seem rather committed, but I have seen it happen to enough people to know it is a possibility.

 

Good luck with your endeavor and clear skies.

I very much agree.  My plan right now is to get the 5SE for a few years to learn basic astrophotography techniques with, before deciding if I really want a more serious (and expensive, and heavy) mount for better astrophotos than I can get with the spur-gear wedge fork mount.  My goal right now is to just have something good enough for transits and eclipses (and the occasional comet), so I can use it for the 2019 Mercury transit and the 2024 total Solar eclipse.

 

The longer the focal length, the more difficult it is to align the telescope.  So if I want a focal length between 750 mm and 1500 mm for full-disc prime-focus imaging of Sol and Luna in a Canon APS-C sensor, I would need either a manual equatorial mount or a GOTO mount.  What I have right now is 1000 mm of focal length on a manual altazimuth mount, and it is very difficult to use.

 

Specifically for full-disc Solar/Lunar imaging with a Canon APS-C sensor, below are my top choices (excluding open-tube OTAs).  Of all of them, the C5 has the second-smallest mass (after the 80-mm refractor), the shortest tube length, and the smallest moment of inertia, so would have the best performance on a GOTO mount.

 

https://www.celestro...80eq-telescope/

 

https://www.telescop.../335/p/9024.uts

 

https://www.celestro...-102-telescope/

 

https://www.celestro...ized-telescope/

 

https://www.celestro...-127-telescope/


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 09:44 AM.


#11 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 09:53 AM

I'm visual only so most of what you are talking about is Greek to me, but I've been around a while. I must say you have certainly immersed yourself in the research of your endeavor. I am also aware that when the bug bites it is hard to hold back the urge to get absolutely everything you think you need, immediately.

 

The only piece of advice that I have to offer is to try to pace yourself a little, I would purchase just the scope and a few necessary accessories and master it from top to bottom before investing in everything you have listed. You never know the experience gained may take you in a totally different direction. It would be a shame to have invested in everything only to find out that you need to sell it all, at a loss, to take a different route.

 

You can take my advice with a grain of salt, you do seem rather committed, but I have seen it happen to enough people to know it is a possibility.

 

Good luck with your endeavor and clear skies.

Especially this time of year, one of my favorite things to do with the telescope I have now is Solar observing (though I haven't seen any sunspots since 2017).  I actually did think about going in a completely different direction with getting an Orion Solar StarSeeker and a Meade Coronado PST, and only doing Solar observing (I would prefer the DayStar SolarScout, but it's too heavy for the Solar StarSeeker).  So I know what you're talking about.  But that might get boring eventually, and a day/night 'scope in full color is a lot more versatile (and cheaper).  Plus I want to keep everything as simple as possible for rare events, so not needing a monochrome webcam will be a benefit if I can get a DSLR instead.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 24 November 2018 - 09:55 AM.


#12 jallbery

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Posted 24 November 2018 - 05:38 PM

So I'm about 89% toward getting a Celestron Nexstar 5SE for a first go-to telescope.  To start with, I'm planning to get a mount/OTA carry case, tripod case, eyepiece case, Farpoint desiccants (including the dessicant focuser cap), Solar filter, dew shield, dew heater, and power supply (I already have a HelioPod Solar finder).  Later planning to add a reticle eyepiece, Barlows, SkySync GPS, DSLR camera/T-adapter/T-ring, a piggyback adapter, and then perhaps a Funstar (alas Starizona doesn't make a Hyperstar for the C5).  Much later might add a guidescope, astrowebcam, and perhaps a second faster OTA such as a short-tube refractor for deep-sky imaging on the 5SE mount (or I could just use a fast guidescope for imaging with a webcam, and then use the C5 with a reducer for guiding the guidescope).  I will have to add a finder shoe though to the OTA to add a guidescope.

 

I have seen some interesting posts on Cloudy Nights about the so-called C5 Freestar.  Apparently the C5 is the only OTA where it is fitted so that you can attach a camera directly in front, without needing a Funstar or a Hyperstar.  Obviously it gets even worse results than the Funstar, but it's free to use and might be fun to play with to see what comes out before investing in a Funstar.  How easy, safe, or practical is it to remove the secondary mirror on a C5?  Also, what are Bob knobs, and do I need to add them?

 

Anything else I should get?  Any other tips or tricks for the 5SE or the C5?  Are the Farpoint desiccants worth the expense?  Do I need to get a laser collimator?

 

I am well-aware of the limitations of the mount for long-exposure imaging and not really interested or willing to try anything over a minute or so at most in exposure time with the built-in wedge.  My primary interest in adding a guidescope to a C5 is actually for planetary video astronomy, to autoguide on planets at high magnification, such as for the upcoming Mercury transit.  It should be noted that the mount itself is free, since the MSRP of the C5 alone is more than the MSRP of the 5SE.  So I can buy the 5SE for planetary imaging and still get a better mount in the future (such as an AVX or a Sirius) for deep-sky imaging, and will actually have saved money.

>>I have seen some interesting posts on Cloudy Nights about the so-called C5 Freestar.

That's the C6 Freestar:

https://www.cloudyni...ar-for-c6-only/

 

>>Apparently the C5 is the only OTA where it is fitted so that you can attach

>>a camera directly in front, without needing a Funstar or a Hyperstar.

On the C6, the fastar/hyperstar threads are the same size and pitch as standard SCT threads, so you can remove the secondary and attach a standard SCT visual back.  

 

>>Obviously it gets even worse results than the Funstar,

Why is this obvious?  The Funstar contains no optics.  All it is is a machined piece of metal that screws to the hyperstar threads and allows you to attach a camera. I don't see why there would be any difference, provided both can achieve focus.   

 

>>How easy, safe, or practical is it to remove the secondary mirror on a C5?

Removing the secondary and installing a fastar/hyperstar module isn't as scary as it sounds, and is quite easy.  Practical?  Well, if you are thinking about hanging a DSLR off a Funstar, your going to have a massive central obstruction.   Starizona doesn't recommend using a DSLR with hyperstar on SCTs smaller than a C9.25.   I've never seen any results from a funstar/freestar setup that even tempted me to try it.   IMO, the cost of a Funstar is much better applied toward either a used Meade F/3.3 reducer, or an ST80, ED80 or some other shorter focal length scope.

 

>>Autoguiding for solar system video astronomy

Why?  Lunar, solar, and planetary exposures are short.  If you start to drift off axis, just make a small correction like you would visually.    An additional problem is that I believe most autoguide systems are designed for equatorially mounted scopes (corrections are made in RA and DEC, and primarily in RA).

 

>>10 lbs of payload

I was unhappy with the visual performance of the 4/5SE mount with a 5" Mak (7-8 pounts).  You are asking a lot out of a mount that was never intended to be an astrophotography platform.

 

>>It should be noted that the mount itself is free, since the MSRP of the C5 alone is more than the MSRP of the 5SE.

First of all, the C5 that is sold standalone is the spotting scope version that comes with a lifetime warranty.  The 5SE does not come with a warranty.  Second of all, the street price of the C5 spotting scope is $475 vs the $599 sale price for the 5SE.  

 

As far as other accessories, I'd look into Backyard EOS if you really want to do astrophotography with a Canon DSLR.  I'd also recommend anti-vibration pads.


Edited by jallbery, 24 November 2018 - 06:01 PM.


#13 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 08:37 AM

Gonna get the 5SE.  Is there an easy way to check the collimation at home before taking it outside?  Or is this probably not necessary?  Should I get the Celestron collimation eyepiece, or should I get something with a laser?  This is my first time buying a telescope (the broken telescope I have now I got for free).



#14 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 08:54 AM

If I already have a Meade RS-232 cable, will that work for Celestron?  Or do I have to buy a new cable?  The second thing I would probably want to do out of the box is make sure the firmware is up-to-date.

 

https://www.meade.co...ped-models.html

 

https://www.celestro...r-rs-232-cable/


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 25 November 2018 - 08:54 AM.


#15 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 09:08 AM

Any recommendations for Bahtinov masks?  Are they all about the same?



#16 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 09:26 AM

How important is it to have a laptop heating pad?  The one from Kendrick is super expensive :-( .  Aren't electronics supposed to perform better in the cold?



#17 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 10:31 AM

Do I need to buy a dew heater in winter though?  Or can I wait until spring for that?  I have never seen dew in winter but I don't go out at night too often when it is cold.



#18 jallbery

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:02 PM

If I already have a Meade RS-232 cable, will that work for Celestron?  Or do I have to buy a new cable?  The second thing I would probably want to do out of the box is make sure the firmware is up-to-date.

 

https://www.meade.co...ped-models.html

 

https://www.celestro...r-rs-232-cable/

The Celestron and Meade cables are not compatible.  However, I think the 5SE is now shipping with the newer USB hand controller, in which case you'd need a USB cable.  The current product page ( https://www.celestro...rized-telescope ) says there is a USB port on the hand controller.

 

 

 

Gonna get the 5SE.  Is there an easy way to check the collimation at home before taking it outside?  Or is this probably not necessary?  Should I get the Celestron collimation eyepiece, or should I get something with a laser?  This is my first time buying a telescope (the broken telescope I have now I got for free).

The collimation eyepiece is not that useful for an SCT.   To collimate an SCT inside you'd need a long enough room and an artificial star.  It's probably not necessary, and real stars are free...


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#19 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:11 PM

The Celestron and Meade cables are not compatible.  However, I think the 5SE is now shipping with the newer USB hand controller, in which case you'd need a USB cable.  The current product page ( https://www.celestro...rized-telescope ) says there is a USB port on the hand controller.

 

 

 

The collimation eyepiece is not that useful for an SCT.   To collimate an SCT inside you'd need a long enough room and an artificial star.  It's probably not necessary, and real stars are free...

Wow!  I did not know they had USB on the SE series.  I thought only the Evolution had that.  So I don't need a serial cable at all then to do firmware updates and remote control?? 

 

It's being shipped from Illinois, so that is only half of a mountain range that it needs to go over on a bumpy truck compared to the sellers in California.

 

Any opinions on Baader vs. Astrozap for a Solar filter?  Suggestions on Bahtinov masks?  Still trying to figure out a power supply.  Does the Celestron Lithium Pro have cord-wrap issues on the 5SE when attached to the tripod leg?



#20 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:14 PM

Just FYI, if anyone else is getting a 5SE for Cyber Monday, OpticsPlanet.com has the lowest price on the internet, an additional 11% off the already-reduced holiday sale price.



#21 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:23 PM

Any opinions on this?

 

https://www.agenaast...controller.html

 

I would like to get it to protect the handcontroller, but then I would need to get a clip or something to attach it to the tripod leg like on the SLT?  I saw that JMI has a bracket for the 5SE, but not sure if that would work.

 

The Artesky version is a little nicer, with a zipper and a strap, but costs more:

 

https://www.altairas...tive-Cover.html


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 25 November 2018 - 07:24 PM.


#22 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:30 PM

Hm.  I checked the manual, and it says that the package should already include an RS-232 cable.  I guess Celestron wants me to update it as soon as possible too.  But that would mean it's not using USB?  I already have an RS-232 to USB adapter, so I should be good then?

 

https://celestron-si...4 languages.pdf

 

It includes a camera shutter cable too.  I really want to get a Canon M50, but the M50 doesn't have a remote-timer/remote-control port, so it can only be remote-controlled over USB from the PC like a webcam would.  :-(


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 25 November 2018 - 07:32 PM.


#23 PXR-5

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:49 PM

Nicole, please take this with a grain of salt also.
With all those extras you could get the 6se, with the 6, you get a beefier mount that doesn't weigh much more. Just a thought.

Any hoot I love my SE :)

#24 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 07:54 PM

Nicole, please take this with a grain of salt also.
With all those extras you could get the 6se, with the 6, you get a beefier mount that doesn't weigh much more. Just a thought.

Any hoot I love my SE smile.gif

 

I was actually thinking of getting the Evolution 6, but I specifically want the wider field of view available from the C5 for full-disc Solar/Lunar imaging with a Canon APS-C camera.  The primary goal of the 5SE for me is as a lightweight travel 'scope for transits and eclipses (we have two coming up in 2019 here in the Eastern USA).  Plus I can use the money saved on some cool accessories.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 25 November 2018 - 07:57 PM.

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#25 Nicole Sharp

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Posted 25 November 2018 - 08:36 PM

Is there any point in getting a 0.63X reducer on a C5 (1250/125) for visual use or afocal imaging?  Would it work with a 32-mm 52-degree AFOV eyepiece?  I know it won't work with a Canon APS-C sensor without vignetting.


Edited by Nicole Sharp, 25 November 2018 - 08:38 PM.



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