Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

Engineering, Design and Construction of Portable Newtonian Telescopes

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Starman47

Starman47

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: 10 Jun 2018
  • Loc: Tennessee

Posted 07 December 2018 - 06:46 AM

I am thinking of a last minute idea for Santa to bring to me. So, on that note, is the Albert Highe book Engineering, Design and Construction of Portable Newtonian Telescopes a good book for someone who is a novice at telescope making? Specifically, i am thinking of building the 16" f/4.5 that Highe talks about.

 

Could I use the book's principles for building a small telescope or two (e.g. 8" f/5 and a 12" f/5) as practice before taking on a big project (16" f/4.5)?.



#2 Oberon

Oberon

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2479
  • Joined: 24 Feb 2013
  • Loc: Hunter Valley NSW Australia

Posted 07 December 2018 - 06:55 AM

The Albert Highe book provides an excellent guidance for anyone who wants to understand the engineering principles to apply to telescope construction.



#3 Jeff Morgan

Jeff Morgan

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10003
  • Joined: 28 Sep 2003
  • Loc: Prescott, AZ

Posted 07 December 2018 - 09:06 AM

Excellent book.

 

As far as tackling a smaller project first - depends upon your own starting point for shop skills and comfort level. One always gets a little better from experience. The 2nd effort will be better than than the 1st. The 12th will be better than the 11th.

 

From an engineering perspective, I think you could jump right in on the 16" project using Highe's book.



#4 Starman47

Starman47

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: 10 Jun 2018
  • Loc: Tennessee

Posted 07 December 2018 - 09:38 AM

Thanks for the comments.

 

Just FYI, I built a 12" Dobstuff telescope from a kit about 2 1/2 years ago. . It has been a great travel telescope. I figure that it has traveled more than one time around the world (over 24,000 miles). It has used in NJ, NC, TN, GA, TX, MO, IL and in Australia (for 18 months).

Right now it has a GSO primary that has been tested at 0.96 Strehl. In fact the tester says it is so good for this type of mirror that he would not recommend refiguring it.  My next change is to take out the 3 vane curved spider and GSO secondary. I will replace it with an Antares (1/20 wave) secondary mirror and an Astrosystems 4 vane spider. On that note it will probably need a bit more counter weight at the bottom.

 

And then ... idea.gif 

 

I think that I will ask Santa for the book. 



#5 perfessor

perfessor

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 594
  • Joined: 30 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Northern Illinois

Posted 07 December 2018 - 10:45 AM

I bought the book recently, and consider it money well spent.  Many chapters are more along the lines of an engineering textbook rather than a "how to" manual.  If he had just written a "how-to" book it would be about half the size.  But if  you want to scale his designs up or down, or optimize components based on your own mirror weights, you'll want to have some of those textbook chapters to refer to.  

 

The book makes an interesting contrast with Kriege & Berry, whose designs are quite serviceable but end up looking rather chunky.  Mr. Highe has gone to great effort at optimizing for weight and portability.  So yeah, highly recommended.



#6 Pinbout

Pinbout

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 21371
  • Joined: 22 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Montclair, NJ

Posted 07 December 2018 - 12:03 PM

I am thinking of a last minute idea for Santa to bring to me. So, on that note, is the Albert Highe book Engineering, Design and Construction of Portable Newtonian Telescopes a good book for someone who is a novice at telescope making? Specifically, i am thinking of building the 16" f/4.5 that Highe talks about.

 

Could I use the book's principles for building a small telescope or two (e.g. 8" f/5 and a 12" f/5) as practice before taking on a big project (16" f/4.5)?.

its a nice step from a 8in f5

gallery_106859_3508_252278.jpg

 

to a 12inf5 cause

 

gallery_106859_3508_302561.jpg

 

 issues magnify as you go bigger.


  • DHEB, Starman47 and N3p like this

#7 N3p

N3p

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 169
  • Joined: 25 Jun 2018

Posted 07 December 2018 - 12:57 PM

Those are very good looking telescope Pinbout.


  • Pinbout likes this

#8 Starman47

Starman47

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 34
  • Joined: 10 Jun 2018
  • Loc: Tennessee

Posted 07 December 2018 - 02:42 PM

I also like the two telescopes. What type of edge support system did you use for your primary mirrors?



#9 Pinbout

Pinbout

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 21371
  • Joined: 22 Feb 2010
  • Loc: Montclair, NJ

Posted 07 December 2018 - 03:03 PM

both are front collimating

 

either nylon cap screws - act like compliant bearings or rollers...

 

med_gallery_106859_3508_380925.jpg

 

med_gallery_106859_3508_237362.jpg


Edited by Pinbout, 07 December 2018 - 03:04 PM.

  • stargazer193857 likes this

#10 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6341
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 07 December 2018 - 03:17 PM

The project you'll finish is the one you want to finish most. However, if core skills need to be developed, better to practice on something cheaper.

#11 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6341
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 07 December 2018 - 03:19 PM

both are front collimating

either nylon cap screws - act like compliant bearings or rollers...

med_gallery_106859_3508_380925.jpg

med_gallery_106859_3508_237362.jpg


That mirror cell looks nice.
  • Pinbout likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics