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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 3)

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#476 Thphy

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Posted 12 May 2019 - 09:51 PM

LOL, that’s a good one, I laughed. In the past I did lift weights in the gym 1.5 hours a day, 6 days a week. I need to start back up again... getting older.


Ever think of entering the Arnold Strong Man contest?

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#477 Corcaroli78

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 02:49 AM

Last Saturday night i had a quick binocular session. As the days are longer, i planned to start around 23:00 but even at that time, the sky was not fully dark, well...i was already outside so i decided to get the best from the conditions.

 

This time I used the Zeiss Jena 10x50 and started touring the Perseus area.  The Double Cluster was there, but the contrast against the sky did not help so i pointed to other directions.

 

I observed Polaris and the Engagement Ring, M81+M82, Cor Caroli, Arcturus, M3, M13, Mel 111, Vindematrix, Spica, M10 and M12 in Ophiuchus. and i had a nice view of Lyra above the roofs. I dedicate some time to observe the double double and the star association around the constellation. Cygnus was below the roofs, but some starry areas satisfied my curiosity especially after looking for something in Camelopardalis.

 

I closed the session one hour later with a quick look at the Moon.  Soon the summer will come and i will be limited to the Moon as the planets will be very low in my location.  I really wanted to look for the bright galaxies in Leo and Virgo as i have not been able to identify them, but maybe in the next season.

 

Clear bino viewed skies to all!

 

Carlos


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#478 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 03:53 AM

Got a new cap with "Albireo" and Gold/Blue Stars above name, so 1st thing I looked at with my 15x70

Barska's was "Albireo", - And the Last thing I viewed also. In between, I checked out what I could remember And Find. M39/M27/M4/M80/M71/M11/M12/M10/M107/M19/M22/M28/M6/M7/M8/M20/M13/M92/O1 and O2Cyg/Garnet Star/Summer Bee's/Brochi's Cluster/episilon Lyra/Vega/ Altair/Antares/Zubenelgenubi/some sweeping/Jupiter w/3moons on left, 1 moon just to right, Saturn clearly had rings, but not quite enough power to show separation from disk. The moon was pretty bright, and I think that is why I could not pull up M57, but I was surprised to get most things I looked for.  Got Caps now with "Zubenelgenubi"/ "Albireo"/ 2 coming with "Polaris" as a double star/ and a few more soon with some other Favorites embroidered on them, that I will use as my "Observing Hats", or "Night Caps".  Someone on this site has a quote "You have to grow older, but you don't have to grow up". Tipping my Hats to him. 


Edited by Thomas Marshall, 13 May 2019 - 04:35 PM.

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#479 alberto76

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 05:56 AM

I started with a look at Melotte 111, aka "Coma Berenices". It fits very nicely in my 8x42's FOV, and has become one of my favourite open clusters in these binos, just like Hyades.

Not far from it I found Messier 3 and Messier 53. The later is not among the brightest globular clusters, but the 8-10 stars above magnitude 7 surrounding it make a nice frame.

At 01:00 AM there is already a lot of globular clusters in the sky: at least M3, M4, M5, M10, M12, M13, M53, M92 were easily visible with these binos, as well as some regular size (not huge like Mel 111) open clusters, as IC 4665.

Finally, a word about M104 (aka "Sombrero galaxy"): even far from the best night to see it, I found it to be visible in good 8x42 binos. Not an overwhelming view, just a little patch of light, noticeable with averted vision... but yes, it was there. I found it very easy to locate, despite the usual reports to the contrary, with a convenient star-hopping path. It helps that there are few stars in this field.


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#480 Thphy

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 10:04 PM

I just observed and followed the Hubble telescope with my 20x110 Oberwerk ultras. I couldn’t see the solar panels that well, but I saw a nub! LOL. Hubble almost crossed the moon for my location. Too bad it didn’t
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#481 jupi10

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 06:51 PM

Observed from the roof of a skyscraper in the middle of a western million person city with Pentax PCF WPII 10x50s by a bino newb.

 

M13, M92, M3, M53

M51, Double Cluster, M31

Pallas

Jupiter, Saturn

Milky Way starfields

 

Shocked at how MUCH, as opposed at how little, I could see.


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#482 bcarter1234

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:12 PM

RB-66 with 9mm eyepieces for 83X and 80mm asymmetrical with 30mm for 13X. Looked at M44 at 13X for a long time. Then Castor A and B at 83X. M81 at both magnifications though it was very faint indeed at the lower. M82 could just be detected at the higher. Last stop was Mizar at 13X and 83X. Not bad for an hour in the driveway.

2 binos
 
Take care,
Brent


#483 bcarter1234

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Posted 18 May 2019 - 09:54 PM

Had both binoscopes in the driveway. Earlier in the evening I had a glimpse of Castor A/B and M44. I could spend an hour in that area with pleasure.

 

From 11:30 to 2:30pm

Graffias and Jabbah have become quick favorites, Rho Oph is also a nice view. Jupiter and Saturn were both mesmerizing at 83X. Visited M13, M52, M92 and the Double Double with both scopes. All were better at 83X than 14X, I could not detect M52 at 14X in the 80mm.

 

Where the 80mm comes into its own is when cruising around. Sometimes the forest is more than the sum of the trees. Saw some lovely asterisms in the vicinity of Vega and a beautiful cluster south of Sadr.

 

Before picking up I took a look at Polaris and its companion.

 

Take care,

Brent


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#484 duck2k

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 12:18 AM

Well AZ is lousy again, after coming back on Friday from back East.  Not happy.


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#485 Thphy

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 07:32 PM

....the weather has been lousy here in southeast Texas! Rain, clouds, humidity, and a BRIGHT moon! Of course the skies are barely dark enough where I live to see some DSO’s and globular clusters. I have to drive 40 miles north to get under darker skies...

Oh, I left out Mosquitoes! They suck.
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#486 elmiko

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Posted 19 May 2019 - 08:17 PM

Ya Howard, welcome back! Been more cloudy nights than clear. Had maybe two sessions since you have been back East.

Keep our fingers crossed for Clear skies. Mike


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#487 duck2k

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 12:50 AM

Ya Howard, welcome back! Been more cloudy nights than clear. Had maybe two sessions since you have been back East.

Keep our fingers crossed for Clear skies. Mike

Always standing by...:)


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#488 elmiko

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Posted 20 May 2019 - 08:19 AM

Always standing by...smile.gif

We should have a couple more moonless nights before monsoons.


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#489 bcarter1234

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 08:08 AM

2 short sessions last night. Finished and installed the "upgraded" helical focusers for the 80mm asymmetrical. Made from common plumbing parts they provide 1" of travel and fine focus at 0.0625" per revolution. Installed the 15mm Expanse clones for 27X and a 2.5 degree FOV.

 

Went out to the driveway at about 8:45pm to check out Castor in the remaining twilight. Lovely but no evidence of it's double nature at this magnification. I don't know if darker skies would change the result or not.

 

M44 on the other hand did not disappoint even with the residual light in the sky. I realized that what I love particularly about this formation is that it is like having a miniature sky dome in the eyepiece(s). Tiny constellation here, tiny asterism there, red dwarfs, white dwarfs, brighter, dimmer, the longer you look the more you see. Just to double check before heading in for the evening a quick look at Mizar showed A/B clearly defined and looking amazing. While I'm in the region, sure enough there's M81. It was easier to see than expected in the conditions but still faint.

 

11:15pm session included:

Vega and the Double Double though the secondary splits were not detectable.

M57 was actually visible with direct vision, though just. If I hadn't seen it before at higher magnification I don't believe I would have detected it. There is a bright star with a faint visual companion that I used for a landmark about 50 minutes to the west. According to Stellarium I believe it is Sheliak.

I spent ten very enjoyable minutes scanning the sky about 6 degrees south of Sadr. There are some lovely visual pairs there, not sure which if any are actually doubles. My eye doesn't know and as long as my brain doesn't say, everyone is happy.

Since it was conveniently positioned in an opening in the trees I glided through Coma Bernices, nice but lower mags and wider field do show it to better effect.

Jupiter was practically screaming to be seen so I moved about fifty feet and there it was, bands of color and what certainly looked like color to me at one pole. The moons were bright pin points, the closest looking a little orange.

 

At this point I intended to pick up but Jupiter was being particularly persuasive and a glance to the east showed Saturn was now above the treeline. Out came the RB-66 at 83X, Jupiter sharing more detail and Saturn clearly revealed as a ball in a hoop. Now I really did need to turn in though I wished I'd had the foresight to set the big scope out so it would have been cooled and ready... Another time.

 

Take care,

Brent


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#490 Binojunky

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 09:37 AM

I managed to get a brief look at the moon on Sunday night, the weather has been lousy this spring, binos used, Cannon 12x36 IS, Celestron Cavalry 15x70, D.



#491 hallelujah

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 10:12 AM

SNOW!  coldday.gif



#492 Astroman007

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 10:50 PM

10:50 PM to 11:25 PM, local time. Seeing excellent, transparency good. Temperature a pleasantly cool +6*C, light jacket weather. Not the slightest breeze. Sky dark and richly spangled with stars.

One wonderful meteor seen about five minutes into session. Appearing in the ESE, and reaching its maximum brightness within one to two seconds, it traveled in a fairly level trajectory (with but a slight downward angle) to the NE, where it broke into two pieces. One shot ahead of the other by about two degrees and twice the original's and the follower's speed before both faded out within one-half to three-quarters of a second. In all, the meteor's visibility lasted for roughly six seconds; unusually long. Quite a noteworthy and unique display.

I was very calm and controlled on this night. Sitting in my favorite lawn chair at the front of our driveway, deep breathing and seated comfortably, I shocked myself by holding my 16x70s literally as rock steady as they would be if they were on a parallelogram mount, and panning as smoothly...something that I have never done before. Numerous stars, star fields, asterisms, and DSOs of all sorts were observed on this night of peace and magic. But in keeping with the theme of uninhibited rest and relaxation, not one was consciously identified by name or number (though all's locations were known by heart). No less than five satellites were spotted, and three were tracked for some time. One, the first, briefly eclipsed a faint star near the Big Dipper's handle, and the last was a tumbler of the slightly erratic variety. All moved in a path more or less S to N. Most were fast; one was notably slow.

The frog chorus was in full force, filling the night air with their simple yet sweet undulating melody. The haunting calls of the loons on the river, the smooth sounds of the traffic on the distant highway, the solitary voice of a Canada Sparrow, the twitters of a few stargazing birds, the eerie howls of wolves far to the SE...all added their part to the night's richly textured soundscape. The cool air refreshed and sustained me as it entered and exited my lungs and bathed my exposed skin. For an all too brief time, I was one with the darkness, the creatures and sounds of the night, and the deep starry sky.

Scorpius was just rising, and Jupiter was just on the SE horizon, within the trees and horizon haze. Deep orange, it revealed its disk but not its famous moons, due to a combination of both aforementioned accidents of time and place. But a whole summer has yet to come for this regal celestial visitor; one early poor showing cannot be held against it.

 

P.S.--Tomorrow I go the the post office to obtain and send out the MO for my new 4.7mm Tele Vue Ethos-SX eyepiece, an addition to my recently-obtained TV-85 system. Then I shall be much better prepared for planets. smile.gif


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#493 duck2k

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 09:24 AM

I got out last night and played with the veiled clouds.  The seeing was below average, better than nothing I guess.  I just scanned around with the Obie 10x50.  First time checking the sky out since being back East.

 

managed to get in M13, M92, barely saw M81/82.  Jupiter was on the rise between the palm trees.:)


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#494 elmiko

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:11 AM

Outstanding Howard. I was thinking about getting out last night. It was pretty cloudy over here.

Going up to Greer this weekend. My wife and I rented a cabin. Going to do some imaging and some visual with the big Binos!

Mike


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#495 jdown

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 11:46 AM

10:50 PM to 11:25 PM, local time. Seeing excellent, transparency good. Temperature a pleasantly cool +6*C, light jacket weather. Not the slightest breeze. Sky dark and richly spangled with stars.

One wonderful meteor seen about five minutes into session. Appearing in the ESE, and reaching its maximum brightness within one to two seconds, it traveled in a fairly level trajectory (with but a slight downward angle) to the NE, where it broke into two pieces. One shot ahead of the other by about two degrees and twice the original's and the follower's speed before both faded out within one-half to three-quarters of a second. In all, the meteor's visibility lasted for roughly six seconds; unusually long. Quite a noteworthy and unique display.

I was very calm and controlled on this night. Sitting in my favorite lawn chair at the front of our driveway, deep breathing and seated comfortably, I shocked myself by holding my 16x70s literally as rock steady as they would be if they were on a parallelogram mount, and panning as smoothly...something that I have never done before. Numerous stars, star fields, asterisms, and DSOs of all sorts were observed on this night of peace and magic. But in keeping with the theme of uninhibited rest and relaxation, not one was consciously identified by name or number (though all's locations were known by heart). No less than five satellites were spotted, and three were tracked for some time. One, the first, briefly eclipsed a faint star near the Big Dipper's handle, and the last was a tumbler of the slightly erratic variety. All moved in a path more or less S to N. Most were fast; one was notably slow.

The frog chorus was in full force, filling the night air with their simple yet sweet undulating melody. The haunting calls of the loons on the river, the smooth sounds of the traffic on the distant highway, the solitary voice of a Canada Sparrow, the twitters of a few stargazing birds, the eerie howls of wolves far to the SE...all added their part to the night's richly textured soundscape. The cool air refreshed and sustained me as it entered and exited my lungs and bathed my exposed skin. For an all too brief time, I was one with the darkness, the creatures and sounds of the night, and the deep starry sky.

Scorpius was just rising, and Jupiter was just on the SE horizon, within the trees and horizon haze. Deep orange, it revealed its disk but not its famous moons, due to a combination of both aforementioned accidents of time and place. But a whole summer has yet to come for this regal celestial visitor; one early poor showing cannot be held against it.

 

P.S.--Tomorrow I go the the post office to obtain and send out the MO for my new 4.7mm Tele Vue Ethos-SX eyepiece, an addition to my recently-obtained TV-85 system. Then I shall be much better prepared for planets. smile.gif

Astroman,

   I enjoy your accounts of stargazing because I have the same experience here in northern NM - it isn't just viewing M22 or mu Cep, it's the darkness and the silence broken only by the sounds of nature that make a night under the stars special.  As a birdwatcher also, I must ask what a Canada Sparrow is?  At any rate, keep up the posts.


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#496 Astroman007

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 03:22 PM

Astroman,

   I enjoy your accounts of stargazing because I have the same experience here in northern NM - it isn't just viewing M22 or mu Cep, it's the darkness and the silence broken only by the sounds of nature that make a night under the stars special.  As a birdwatcher also, I must ask what a Canada Sparrow is?  At any rate, keep up the posts.

Hi, thank you for your interest in my reports. Canada Sparrow is another name for the White-Throated Sparrow. Colloquial name taken from both its song and our patriotism. smile.gif

 

If I may ask, what are the typical night sounds of northern New Mexico? Asking because I may one day move there.


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#497 jdown

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 05:05 PM

Hi, thank you for your interest in my reports. Canada Sparrow is another name for the White-Throated Sparrow. Colloquial name taken from both its song and our patriotism. smile.gif

 

If I may ask, what are the typical night sounds of northern New Mexico? Asking because I may one day move there.

What I hear are sounds typical of much of the U.S. - from just after sunset to the end of astronomical twilight, Great Horned Owls, coyotes barking (no wolves !), bats flying around.  One special sound during much of September is the bugling of elk.    


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#498 celestronlover57

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 06:33 AM

Mid inning (SEC  tournament second round LSU vs. MSU) I took a break and went outside with my Pentax 10x24 binoculars.  Waning gibbous moon with Saturn nearby.  Earlier (about 6 hours before moon rise) Saturn was about 0.5 degrees of moon according to Astronomy Magazine.  Also got a quick look at Jupiter.



#499 bcarter1234

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:43 AM

RB-66 in the driveway at 160X using 6mm Expanse clones and 1.3X Barlow made from Svbony 2X Barlow bodies with Burgess 1.9X Barlow cell (thanks to CN user MartinPond for the suggestion).

Swung them around to Mizar A/B and Alcor to align and focus. Pushed the buttons to merge the image in about five seconds. Pushed more buttons to focus both eyes in about ten seconds. JMI knew what they were doing as everything you need is literally at your fingertips. Nice wide split of A/B with Alcor in the distance and a few other faint stars compelling you to take a close look at them.

 

Next up Jupiter, not sure what to expect. Not bad, largish image, a bit soft, several bands showing color variation but no fine detail. Next time I'll try the 6mm without the Barlow at 125X, then 9mm with at 108X and without at 83X to compare views. It is a pleasure to have the flexibility.  

 

Take care,

Brent



#500 bcarter1234

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:47 AM

RB-66 in the driveway at 160X using 6mm Expanse clones and 1.3X Barlow made from Svbony 2X Barlow bodies with Burgess 1.9X Barlow cell (thanks to CN user MartinPond for the suggestion).

Swung them around to Mizar A/B and Alcor to align and focus. Pushed the buttons to merge the image in about five seconds. Pushed more buttons to focus both eyes in about ten seconds. JMI knew what they were doing as everything you need is literally at your fingertips. Nice wide split of A/B with Alcor in the distance and a few other faint stars compelling you to take a close look at them.

Next up Jupiter, not sure what to expect. Not bad, largish image, a bit soft, several bands showing color variation but no fine detail. Next time I'll try the 6mm without the Barlow at 125X, then 9mm with at 108X and without at 83X to compare views. It is a pleasure to have the flexibility.

 

Take care,

Brent


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