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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 3)

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#551 garret

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Posted 17 June 2019 - 11:28 AM

Hi Garret,

 

Thanks for the info!  Now you have provided me with a new and interesting target for the summer time in Denmark. I think the 8x30W will be the perfect binocular for the clouds!

 

And, BTW, will be the first time for me to identify noctilucent clouds (maybe i have seen them before but not aware of what they were)

 

Carlos

Here are more noctilucent clouds images from Germany. Denmark, Polen, UK ect. : http://spaceweatherg...lc_gallery.html

But don't wait too long, by July there are most likely gone.


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#552 Astroman007

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 06:11 PM

I am up in CO, and showing my Mother how to use her 10 x 50’s (Resolux).  I brought my 10 x 50 Obies, and 15x70 Resolux with me.  Using Sky Safari (her app) I showed her Jupiter, and three of the four moons.  It was GRS night, and I showed her what that looked like close up on Sky Safari.  I showed her how to find M13, and M92 by star hopping.  She loved seeing them, and said she knew where they would be next time.  We were at a disadvantage with the moon and some small clouds.  We observed what we could see in clear areas.  I showed her Antares, M4, and M80.  She could not see it in her binos, so I had her focus and look through my 15 x 70’s (we used my Obie monopod).  It started to cloud more, so we went back in the house.watching.gif

Observing with your Mother...nice. smile.gif

 

My Mom and I observe together sometimes. Just enjoying each other's company.


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#553 duck2k

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Posted 18 June 2019 - 07:33 PM

Observing with your Mother...nice. smile.gif

 

My Mom and I observe together sometimes. Just enjoying each other's company.

She loves the sky, and you are right, the company.:)


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#554 Thomas Marshall

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 02:50 AM

A hard busy day, after little sleep, but managed to fit in 'John Wick 3' at the movies, And a good look at the close pairing of Mercury and Mars after sunset, with my 15x70 binoculars.


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#555 Carlos Flores

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 05:48 AM

She could not see it in her binos, so I had her focus and look through my 15 x 70’s (we used my Obie monopod).  

 

Maybe adding another bino to your Mother signature?  Maybe one of your APM? smile.gif

 

Seriously: congratulations, it should be very nice to observe not only with children but also with our parents.

 

Carlos


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#556 CAAD9

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Posted 21 June 2019 - 08:19 PM

Started with Jupiter, looked through Scorpius then south to Crux and on to Omega Centauri.  Using th3 Canon 10x42L IS binoculars.  

 

Then I followed 2 737s going South to Sydney.  According to the Plane Finder App I lost the last one behind a tree 180-200 km distant. At first I thought this was extraordinary.  But when you think about it, the second aircraft kept gaining altitude so by th3 time I lost it, it was at 12,000m or about 37,000 feet.  And we live on a hill so despite being in the burbs I have unobstructed views of the southern horizon.  And when th3 ISS flies over that’s at least 400Km away and I’ve never seen it directly overhead so further away than just it’s altitude and you can see the details in that. So 200km, why not?  Stabilisation really helped here as did the bright strobe lights of the aircraft. 

 

Alas i made the mistake of looking up the formula for figuring out how far away the horizon is on google. Oh boy, “flat earthers”.  Now that’s rabbit hole I really didn’t need to explore after a long work week.  My own fault, I just needed to switch the computer off. Simple really.


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#557 garret

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 03:12 AM

On the evening of June the 21 there was again a massive display of noctilucent clouds in Europe, it was so bright it illuminated the landscape, after sunset it span over 100 degree wide and 45 degree high.

This image is made with a 400mm lens and show even less detail then what I saw with my 10x50 binocular, but brightness and colouring are true.

Attached Thumbnails

  • foto-8-small.jpg

Edited by garret, 22 June 2019 - 03:19 AM.

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#558 hallelujah

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 12:44 PM

Clouds & rain, etc.

 

https://www.msn.com/...cid=mailsignout

coldday.gif

 

Stan



#559 bcarter1234

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 05:09 PM

At 125X with the RB-66 spent a good deal of time on both of these:

Jupiter showing some nice detail. When the conditions were right some differences in colors outside the equatorial zone, often those two areas just appear a uniform cream color. The two bands bordering the central zone sometimes appeared to have very dark brown tobacco colored areas. Watched as Europa passed from view behind the edge of the planet.

Saturn looking very sharp and fake as always, Cassini division was easy to see as well as some shadow on the planet.

M28 was quite wonderful, looked like a steam cloud when it first came into the eyepiece but soon some stars could be resolved.

Double Double was a clean split on both pairs, the pairs look tiny though.

M57 was a treat as always, it puts me in mind of a hole or puncture in the universe.

Alberio pair, they just seem to make their opposite number more intense, the blue looks bluer and the red redder.

 

At 80X with the 80mm asymmetrical:

Jupiter the equatorial bands and three moons were visible by the time I moved to this instrument.

Saturn was lovely as well.

Looked also at Alberio and then shifted down to 27X to add some context. The landmarks I use to locate M57 were visible but not the object itself.

I'm still amazed how much you can see through a very inexpensive telescope...or two in this case.

 

I feel so fortunate to have these opportunities.

 

Take care,

Brent


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#560 CAAD9

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Posted 22 June 2019 - 11:27 PM

I mostly observed Jupiter and Saturn with 14” Dob last night. Saturn looked magical. Curious why you think it looks fake Brent?

 

Rounded out the night with a little binocular observing.  This time Nikon 7x50 Tropicals looking at Crux, Southern Pointers and enjoyed the ghost images when looking at the Moon. I almost always feel compelled to compare them to my only pair of modern roof prism binoculars (Atlas Intrepid 8x42ED something or other).  For star fields the Nikon relic (my pair is from the 1970’s) wins hands down as it does a much better job staying sharp close to the edge. Whereas with the Atlas when looking at Crux all the stars (being out on th3 edges) are semi circular lines.  In contrast looking at the moon the ED glass and modern coatings make the ghosting and stray light vanish and on axis it’s a very sharp view in the Atlas.

 

All good fun.  CS everyone.


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#561 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 June 2019 - 12:42 AM

I viewed the waning gibbous Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, Alcor and Mizar, Epsilon Lyrae, Collinder 399, Melotte 111, M4, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M22, M24, and Picot 1 with my 12x50s while taking breaks from observing with the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at the Naylor Observatory on Saturday night.  There was enough light pollution and haze that I was unable to see 1 Ceres with the 12x50s but I did observe it with the 17" scope and a 10" Orion Dob belonging to an a fellow ASH member.


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#562 bcarter1234

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Posted 23 June 2019 - 01:52 PM

I mostly observed Jupiter and Saturn with 14” Dob last night. Saturn looked magical. Curious why you think it looks fake Brent?

 

All good fun.  CS everyone.

CAAD9,

 

Fake as in "Can that be real?" It just presents such a wonderfully bizarre sight in the eyepiece. It as if someone hung a child's toy in front of your scope. A creation that brings a smile every time. I love that you see a relatively bright but not outstanding object with the naked eye. Then you swing the already focused telescope over and here is this perfect orb centered in a razor sharp ring.

 

Take care,

Brent


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#563 jcj380

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Posted 24 June 2019 - 09:21 AM

Brief session from a darksky getaway cabin before the clouds rolled in -

 

M4 - surprisingly easy in my 15x70s since I can barely see it at home with my ST120.

The Coathanger

Jupiter

Rambled around Cygnus a bit

Lyra but couldn't pick up M57.  Maybe not surprising since it was still close to astronomical twilight


Edited by jcj380, 24 June 2019 - 09:23 AM.


#564 Mr. Bill

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Posted Yesterday, 12:53 PM

Had best night this year.... SQM 21.5+, typically 21.3 from my rural location.

 

Amazing how much difference 0.2 darker magnitude makes in contrast (remember this scale is log)

 

Really makes the bright/dark nebulae in the MW "pop" out against the background starfields and the intricate tapestry of the edges of the star clouds along with the interwoven dark nebulae is mesmerizing....literally awe inspiring and what makes all the frustration of mediocre skies much of the time fade away.

 

Used the 70mm APO +17.5 Morphs (23x @ 3.3 degree fov) which are an amazing combination to sweep these starfields.

 

Also used the 100 APO along side the 70s with the 12.5mm Morphs (44x) to examine specific objects swept up with the 70s....IMO a perfect duo.


Edited by Mr. Bill, Yesterday, 12:55 PM.

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#565 tmichaelbanks

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Posted Yesterday, 03:36 PM

Man...I can only dream of Mr. Bill's dark skies....  smirk.gif

 

Lots and lots of rain here on the Eastern Frontier punctuated by short periods of clear, but the moisture in the air makes for lots of LP and sudden haze formation.  Still, Jupiter is always a wonderful sight and caught a satellite traversing the field parallel to the moons' orbit plane.  Also spied M7 (Ptolemy's Cluster) for the first time low on the horizon, lovely in the 15x70 despite the LP, on the threshold of visibility in the 8x56.

 

Couldn't stop panning through the MW star fields high overhead, with a hint of the dark lanes Mr. Bill describes just barely visible.  Hoping that early July will bring drier, clearer skies.


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#566 celestronlover57

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Posted Yesterday, 05:46 PM

Hoping to spend some time under next dark skies with my Orion Ultraview 10x50 binoculars.



#567 bcarter1234

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Posted Yesterday, 09:53 PM

Spacex launch was possible as early as 11:30 last night so I set the RB-66 out just in case. I wasn't about to stay up until 3:00am for it. No dark skies here it seemed positively blue gray. I left the 6mm eyepieces in for 125X views of Saturn and Jupiter from the driveway. GRS was clearly visible with occasional hints of details in the equatorial zone but nothing definitive. Saturn still looked fake, in a good way. ;-)

 

I checked out the Double Double. Alberio was a satisfying confection before turning in.   

 

Take care,

Brent


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#568 Thomas Marshall

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Posted Today, 03:21 AM

Used my 15x70 Barska's tonight with 'Bino-Bandit' eyeguards. They worked great. Looked at Jupiter/Saturn, M4/M80/M6/M7/M12/M10/S.Beehive/M11/M28/M22/M17/M8/M20/M23/Thru Cygnus/Andromeda Galaxy M31/ Dbl. Cluster/Caroline's Cluster/M15 in Pegasus/. Seems like a long time since I've been able to look upon Andromeda again. Still amazes. And Caroline's Rose too.




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