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What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 3)

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#1401 astronomus1930

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Posted 08 October 2020 - 10:08 AM

Last night was Perseus night with my 15x70 Oberwerk DeLuxe looking east over Lake Michigan: M34, Melotte 20, the double cluster, NGC 1545 and Trumpler 2. The granularity around both the double cluster and Melotte 20 made for a beautifully immersive night of star gazing.


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#1402 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 09 October 2020 - 04:01 PM

I was at the Astronomical Society of Harrisburg's Naylor Observatory again last night.  The transparency was excellent.
 

I logged Jupiter, Mars, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Alcor-Mizar, Epsilon Lyrae, Omicron Cygni, 6 Equulei, the Heart of the Swan asterism, the Leaping Minnow asterism, B142, B143, Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, Collinder 399, IC 4665, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M15, M17, M22, M27, M28, M29, M31, M33, M34, M39, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M45, M52, M56, M71, M103, NGC 457, NGC 663, NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 1528, NGC 7000, NGC 7789, and Stock 2 using Canon IS 15x50s.  A few of the objects required averted vision. 

 

While looking at Epsilon Lyrae (the Double Double), a meteor streaked across the field of view.  I also saw a number of satellite passes.

Seeing B142, B143, and a good part of NGC 7000 from the orange-zone observatory is a very rare occurrence nowadays.

 

I spent the rest of the time observing the waning gibbous Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and a number of DSOs, including M8, M15, M17, M22, and M30, with the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain that's housed in the French Dome.


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#1403 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 14 October 2020 - 01:05 PM

I was at the Astronomical Society of Harrisburg's Naylor Observatory once again last night and once more the transparency was excellent.

I logged Jupiter, Mars, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, Albireo, Alcor-Mizar, Epsilon Lyrae, Omicron Cygni, 6 Equulei, the Engagement Ring asterism, the Heart of the Swan asterism, the Leaping Minnow asterism, B142, B143, Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, Collinder 399, IC 4665, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, M2, M6, M7, M8, M11, M13, M15, M17, M22, M24, M27, M31, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M39, M41, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M45, M52, M56, M71, M92, M103, NGC 457, NGC 654, NGC 663, NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 1528, NGC 1981, NGC 2244, NGC 7000, NGC 7789, and Stock 2 using Canon IS 15x50s.  Some of the objects required averted vision.
 

I also saw another binocular meteor and a number of satellite passes, including Lacrosse 5, CZ-4 rocket body, and NOSS 2-1 (E).  One faint satellite passed just "below" M92.

 

I attempted to observe M74 and M76 without success but I believe I was able to see M77.

I viewed Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, M1, M15, M30, M35, M42, and M43 using the observatory's 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain.  Unfortunately, the seeing was less than ideal.  

The highlight of the night was seeing a bright meteor streak downwards through the winter Milky Way.


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#1404 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 12:20 PM

Last night I looked at Jupiter, Saturn, Albireo, Alcor-Mizar, Epsilon Lyrae, Omicron Cygni, 6 Equulei, the Heart of the Swan asterism, B142, B143, Collinder 399, IC 4665, M7, M8, M11, M13, M15, M22, M27, M39, M56, M71, M92, and NGC 7000 using Canon IS 15x50s.  Averted vision was needed to see M56 and M71.  Given the level of sky brightness at the Naylor Observatory nowadays the Milky Way displayed a surprising amount of texture.

 

I tracked a couple satellites and the Atlas Centaur rocket body too.
 

My wife accompanied me this time and, after I gave her a few tips, was able to locate M15 for the first time with the 15x50s.  We tried out a collapsible reclining chair for binocular observing that she just purchased.

 

I also observed Jupiter, including a GRS transit and a shadow transit by Ganymede, Saturn, and Mars with the Naylor Observatory's 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain.  The seeing was mediocre, however.

 

Unfortunately, clouds moved in early so it was a rather short night.


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#1405 sonny.barile

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Posted 15 October 2020 - 12:59 PM

Set up my BT100’s in the driveway last night. Had a nice time viewing Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars at 80x. The sky was stable. I could make out 2 bands on Jupiter very clearly and Mars showed it’s dark blotch across the center very well. I have never seen Mars this well. Very bright yet still scaled nicely in the field at 80x. 


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#1406 Obx

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Posted 16 October 2020 - 08:33 AM

Only had a short time outside. Viewed Jupiter’s moons, Mars and the Andromeda Galaxy using Swift 8.5x44 (really 9x44) roof prisms on a clear night. 


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#1407 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 01:01 AM

Saturday night was almost a repeat of Wednesday night.  The transparency was excellent after sunset at the Naylor Observatory but before too long high clouds began to move in, sporadic at first and then covering much of the sky.  The clouds were not as thick as on Wednesday night, however.

 

I was able to log Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Albireo, Alcor-Mizar, Epsilon Lyrae, 6 Equulei, the Heart of the Swan asterism, B142, B143, Collinder 399, IC 4665, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, M8, M11, M13, M15, M22, M24, M27, M31, M33, M34, M39, M45, M56, M71, M92, M103, NGC 663, NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869, NGC 884, and NGC 7000 using Canon IS 15x50s.  I also tracked the Chinese CZ-4 R/B (rocket body).

I observed Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Uranus with the observatory's 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain.  However, once again the seeing was rather poor.


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#1408 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 21 October 2020 - 03:20 AM

The conditions were not too good but I was able to view Mars, Epsilon Lyrae, the Heart of the Swan asterism, Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, Collinder 399, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, M29, M31, M33, M34, M39, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M45, and NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism using Canon IS 15x50s from the Naylor Observatory. 

 

I also had some excellent views of Mars through the observatory's 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain.

 

I had gone to the observatory hoping to see some Orionid meteors but the sky became completely overcast about an hour after I started my meteor watch.  I didn't see a single Orionid.  At least, I got to do a bit of binocular observing and had some great glimpses of the Red Planet.



#1409 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 10:13 PM

I viewed the near isosceles triangle formed by the waxing crescent Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn, Epsilon Lyrae, Collinder 399, M11, and M31 with Canon IS 15x50s early tonight from my home.  A bit later I observed the Moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars using the 6" f/8 Orion SkyQuest XT6 "quick-look scope" that I keep in my garage, a 25mm Plössl (48mm), and an 8-24mm zoom eyepiece (50 to 150x).


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#1410 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 01:55 AM

I went outside once again to put the Orion Dob away and quickly logged Omicron Cygni, Melotte 20, and M39.  The sky was blanketed by high clouds and there was heavy dew by then so I called it a night.



#1411 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 01:51 PM

Here's an iPhone photo of last night's lunar triangle.  The 43%-illuminated Moon is overexposed.  By 2:00 UT, the Moon, Jupiter, and Saturn were within a circle with a diameter of 6 degrees.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Lunar Triangle October 22 IMG_8551 Processed.jpg

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#1412 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 04:05 AM

Well, the Friday night weather forecasts were certainly well off the mark. The transparency at the Naylor Observatory was excellent and the skies remained clear until close to 3:00 a.m. EDT.
 

I viewed the Lunar V and Lunar X with the observatory's 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at 116, 170, and 259x. After the Moon had set, I observed Mars for quite some time which meant that I missed the opportunity to log some of the summer binocular DSOs.
 

Here's what I viewed with Canon IS 15x50s: Epsilon Lyrae, Omicron Cygni, the Leaping Minnow asterism, Kemble's Cascade, Collinder 65, Collinder 69, Collinder 70, Melotte 20, Melotte 25, M29, M31, M33, M34, M35, M36, M37, M38, M39, M41, M42 and the Sword of Orion, M44, M45, N52, M103, NGC 654, NGC 659, NGC 663, NGC 752 and the Golf Putter asterism, NGC 869, NGC 884, NGC 1528, NGC 1981, NGC 2244, NGC 2264, NGC 7789, Stock 2, Stock 23, and Trumpler 2.
 

Melotte 20 and Melotte 25 were simply outstanding and it was the first time that I logged Trumpler 2 with a binocular.


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#1413 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 03:20 PM

Here’s a photo of the REDCAMP collapsible recliner that I used last night at the Naylor Observatory while I was observing with Canon IS 15x50s.

 

https://www.amazon.c...ng-goods&sr=1-4

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  • Observing Chair.jpg

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#1414 Dave Mitsky

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Posted Yesterday, 09:10 PM

Here's a screen shot (click to enlarge) from Phil Harrington's freeware TUBA program showing the position of the open cluster Trumpler 2 (Collinder 29) that I observed on Friday night.  Trumpler 2 (Tr 2) lies at the center, about two thirds of the way up from the bottom of the image. 

http://philharrington.net/tuba.htm

 

Trumpler 2 is located just to the southeast of the Double Cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884).

 

Some information on Tr 2: RA 2h36m53s, Dec +55°54.9', V-mag 5.9, Size 17.0', Distance 2000 light years

 

The spectral type K3.5II-IIIr star HD 16068 is the cluster's brightest star.
 

https://upload.wikim...GhgxuqjyPtn7xAE

Attached Thumbnails

  • Trumpler 2 TUBA Processed Cropped Resized CN.jpg


#1415 Cestus

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Posted Today, 01:30 PM

Last night I focused on the moon. I am almost done with the Astronomical Societies Lunar Observer Program. Just a couple of more craters to go.




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