Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 3)

  • Please log in to reply
2282 replies to this topic

#2126 Napp

Napp

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 3,801
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2015
  • Loc: Northeast Florida, USA

Posted 11 October 2021 - 10:02 AM

Last night was mainly a scope night working the Caldwell list but I set up the 25X100’s for larger targets.  I was at my club’s dark site - Bortle 3.  The waxing crescent moon and Jupiter and its moon’s looked great in the twilight.  While I was waiting for the sky to get really dark I pointed the binoculars at M31.  The core showed but for some reason M32 looked fuzzier and a bit fainter than usual.  The sky was still a bit bright for M110.  I swung over to the Double Cluster so many jewels sparkling in the deepening twilight.  As a challenge I looked for M33.  No problem finding it.  It was just a big faint smudge but it was there in deepening twilight and quite low.  Most of the rest of the night was devoted to scope work.  Just after 10:00 PM a large, green, slow fireball appeared a bit southeast of Cassiopeia and streaked toward below Polaris!  It reached about magnitude -8 and fragmented along the way.  That alone made the 120 mile round trip worthwhile.  I later used the binoculars for the North America Nebula.  I had waited a bit late and the nebula was sinking low.  The view wasn’t that great but the outline of the Gulf of Mexico was quite distinct.  Mexico stood out but the rest of North America faded into the star field.  Fighting dew was a continuously increasing problem all night.   Eventually I was spending more time with the hairdryer than the optics so called it a night.


  • Thomas Marshall, j.gardavsky and aznuge like this

#2127 aznuge

aznuge

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 202
  • Joined: 04 Nov 2020
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 11 October 2021 - 12:09 PM

In a similar effort, but under Bortle 7 skies, I attempted M33 several times last night, with three hand held binoculars - 8x42s, 10x42 IS, and 10x50.  But zilch, nada, zero on that one.  Fortunately I had great views of M31, M34 Melotte 20, Melotte 25, and the double cluster.  But the frustration with M33 has been nagging for some time. I believe that much darker skies will be needed for M33 than are available in my backyard.


  • Napp and j.gardavsky like this

#2128 Napp

Napp

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 3,801
  • Joined: 26 Jul 2015
  • Loc: Northeast Florida, USA

Posted 11 October 2021 - 12:23 PM

In a similar effort, but under Bortle 7 skies, I attempted M33 several times last night, with three hand held binoculars - 8x42s, 10x42 IS, and 10x50.  But zilch, nada, zero on that one.  Fortunately I had great views of M31, M34 Melotte 20, Melotte 25, and the double cluster.  But the frustration with M33 has been nagging for some time. I believe that much darker skies will be needed for M33 than are available in my backyard.

My sky at home is Bortle 7.  I have never been able to see M33 from home with binoculars or scope but I have to admit I have not made a serious effort.  A dark sky is key.  On a good night at the Bortle 3 site I was at last night M33 can be located naked eye.  Last night was not one of those nights.  I was surprised I was able to see M33 in late twilight at low altitude.  Obviously 100mm of aperture made the difference.  I think it's time to seriously try to see it in my home sky.


  • Mike G. and aznuge like this

#2129 Mike G.

Mike G.

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Posts: 2,624
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2013
  • Loc: Oberlin, Ohio

Posted 11 October 2021 - 12:55 PM

My sky at home is Bortle 7.  I have never been able to see M33 from home with binoculars or scope but I have to admit I have not made a serious effort.  A dark sky is key.  On a good night at the Bortle 3 site I was at last night M33 can be located naked eye.  Last night was not one of those nights.  I was surprised I was able to see M33 in late twilight at low altitude.  Obviously 100mm of aperture made the difference.  I think it's time to seriously try to see it in my home sky.

my backyard deck is bortle7/8 and on a good night last week I had the 8" SCT out looking for M33.  with the 30mm APM UFF, I had the scope in the correct position, but identifying M33 was guesswork.  it was only by tapping the tube to get a small bit of movement I could detect that yes, there was just a very, very slight change in contrast where M33 should be.  so seeing it in good detail through the APM 100's was a happy moment  indeed.  and validation that the money spent on those fine instruments was money well spent.


  • Napp, astronomus1930 and aznuge like this

#2130 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,015
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 13 October 2021 - 07:37 AM

Yesterday night i started a side by side comparison of my two 10x50 Porros. The Zeiss Dekarem and the TS 10x50 (BA8). I am documenting the findings for a short review coming soon.

 

Targets at night have been the Double Cluster, Vega, North America nebula, Northern Coalsack, Andromeda, Owl Cluster, Kemble´s cascade, Dumbell Nebula, M13 and Coathanger.

 

On tripods
  both behind

 

 

Carlos


  • Sergey Stern, Mike G., j.gardavsky and 3 others like this

#2131 aznuge

aznuge

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 202
  • Joined: 04 Nov 2020
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 15 October 2021 - 05:42 PM

All this talk of binoholism and rationalization for buying more binoculars reminded me of a practice taught to me by my grandmother at an early age.  Among other things she served a fine family breakfast. She often would include small sausages which I loved.  If left to my own devices I would eat the sausages non-stop.  But she would insist that for every sausage I ate I would have to eat a piece of bread before eating another sausage - because the meat in the sausage was so "rich".  This kept me to 2 or 3 sausages per breakfast at her house.  Thinking about new binocular acquisitions has been consuming a lot of my "astronomy appetite" lately.  Consequently I have been feeling the need to restore the eating of the bread of "observing" to balance the sausages of equipment.  In the long run I have found that observing is more fulfilling to me in this hobby, even though the attraction of acquiring additional  instruments never completely dissipates.

 

Last night I spent a wonderful 30 minutes or so studying M45 - again.  Whether low power hand held, or higher power BTs, it is a wonderful sight to behold.  Last night's view was through 10x50 binoculars.  And my focus within the cluster eventually became Allie's Braid, Venus' Chain, my wife's "Necklace", or my "Thunderbolt" - whatever to call it. Pleiades is in a perfect location in the mid to late evening sky when viewed from my backyard deck, with the house forming a blind against the direct moonlight from the south.

 

With most nights recently, my observing has been relaxing and casual.  But I determined to retire early and rise well before sun up to view some deep sky targets best visible in the early AM.  So at 0400 I began to focus on Monoceros, Canis Major and Puppis with 8x42 hand held binoculars, and 44x100 BTs.  Here are these results:

 

  • NGC 2244 - Monoceros. AKA Harp Cluster: Bright group of 6-8+ magnitude stars within the Rosette Nebula - at the NW end of MON, approaching Orion. It's about two thirds the distance from Procyon to Betelgeuse. Crisp, bold grouping of 6-7 stars forming the three rungs of a ladder. I could see the faint glow of the nebula surrounding it which was wide and circular.
  • NGC 2264 - Monoceros. Includes 15 MON, the brightest in the cluster (5th mag) and the Cone Nebula - listed as the Christmas tree Cluster. Located about 3 degrees SSW of X1 GEM. Angular shaped open cluster, opening up toward the SW.
  • NGC 2251 - Monoceros. A tight, linear string (NW to SE) of 9th magnitude plus stars - a little over a degree to the NNE of 13 MON. 4-5 visible stars made a tight diamond shape.  The cluster forms a quadrilateral with three 8th mag stars to the south and west.
  • NGC 2360 - Canis Major. Also named Caroline's Cluster and Melotte 64:  Attractive, but faint, dense cluster, with many dimly visible stars in the shape of an ellipse. It's about a half degree east of HD 56405 in CMA.
  • NGC 2539 - Puppis. Large, faint, circular cluster of seemingly innumerable stars like a globular, but some are distinctly visible.  It is located just to the NW of 19 Puppis; also it is 6-7 degrees East of the subtly beautiful M46 and the stunning M47.

With more targets left in Puppis lower in the southeastern sky, the brightening air forced a postponement until another early morning.  The most memorable DSOs of this session were the Harp Cluster due to its bold, ladder shape and Rosette Nebula background; and the mysterious NGC 2539 on the verge of being globular, but with pinpoint definitions that invite a revisit at 85x.

 

nuge


Edited by aznuge, 15 October 2021 - 05:48 PM.

  • Fiske, Erik Bakker, Napp and 5 others like this

#2132 MT4

MT4

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,114
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 15 October 2021 - 06:54 PM

All this talk of binoholism and rationalization for buying more binoculars reminded me of a practice taught to me by my grandmother at an early age.  Among other things she served a fine family breakfast. She often would include small sausages which I loved.  If left to my own devices I would eat the sausages non-stop.  But she would insist that for every sausage I ate I would have to eat a piece of bread before eating another sausage - because the meat in the sausage was so "rich".  This kept me to 2 or 3 sausages per breakfast at her house.  Thinking about new binocular acquisitions has been consuming a lot of my "astronomy appetite" lately.  Consequently I have been feeling the need to restore the eating of the bread of "observing" to balance the sausages of equipment.  In the long run I have found that observing is more fulfilling to me in this hobby, even though the attraction of acquiring additional  instruments never completely dissipates.

 

 

That's a lovely story! 

 

But I am a bit confused as to which is the eating of sausages and which is the eating of the bread.  You know, observing is definitely "rich" smile.gif


  • aznuge likes this

#2133 aznuge

aznuge

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 202
  • Joined: 04 Nov 2020
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 15 October 2021 - 11:39 PM

That's a lovely story! 

 

But I am a bit confused as to which is the eating of sausages and which is the eating of the bread.  You know, observing is definitely "rich" smile.gif

Good point - the universe is "rich" for observation.  But for me the emphasis has been on the instruments of late, so needed the bread of observation...  I suppose if in the future if I over emphasize observation (if is this even possible), then I may have to go out and buy some more of those tasty sausages to compensate smile.gif


  • Carbstone and MT4 like this

#2134 ECP M42

ECP M42

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,819
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: central Europe 45°N

Posted 16 October 2021 - 01:26 AM

panino-col-salame.jpg

 

Bread and salami (cured sausage) is "the champion's snack" lol.gif  

 

Great point! waytogo.gif


  • aznuge likes this

#2135 aznuge

aznuge

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 202
  • Joined: 04 Nov 2020
  • Loc: Arizona, USA

Posted 16 October 2021 - 11:02 AM

panino-col-salame.jpg

 

Bread and salami (cured sausage) is "the champion's snack" lol.gif  

 

Great point! waytogo.gif

Now THAT is the perfectly balanced snack of an astro champion!!waytogo.giflol.gifbow.gif


  • ECP M42 likes this

#2136 Fiske

Fiske

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,353
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 16 October 2021 - 03:27 PM

I had a fine observing session from my driveway last night, despite a 78% waxing gibbous moon. In the afternoon I rigged up a second Costco shelving unit with a fold out light shield using 8x6 foot tarps. The shelving units are easy to roll out of the garage, incorporate plenty of shelf space for binoculars and observing accessories, and create an enjoyable observing space free from the glare of neighboring driveway lights.

 

I observed with the 100XL-SD and various 10x binoculars Nikon/Fuji/OB Ultra/Resolux (doing side by side comparisons).

 

Here is an area in Cygnus where I spent some time with the 100XL using 14 and 10mm Pentax XW eyepieces.

 

med_gallery_2707_15673_109562.jpg

 

med_gallery_2707_15673_846931.jpg

 

ENG 72 / 29 Cygni

20h14m +36*48'

4.96/6.71 215.3" pa 155*

The fine orange color of the secondary of this optical double star is what first caught my attention, in a fine asterism of brighter stars (indicated by the green field ring in the image). The two stars didn't seem like a double (identified them later), just part of the larger asterism The asterism was more striking visually from my driveway than is apparent from this simbad image because the view was not complicated by the fainter stars. I'm interested to see if the asterism will be as prominent from a darker site or less obvious in a richer star field view. ENG 72 should be a nice challenge for handheld 10x50 instruments, more due to the profusion of stars in the region, given the magnitude and separation of the two components. My observations of this field were done with a Nikon 10x70 SP on a parallelogram mount, and the views were superb.

 

SEI 1028

20h14m +36*33'

9.27/10.51 13.3" pa 177*

Relatively easy to observe with the 100XL-SD and 10mm XW eyepieces, despite the magnitude difference and faintness of the secondary. Both stars white.

 

SEI 1031

20h14m +36*17'

8.19/10.20 18.6" pa 61*

Somehow more difficult to resolve than SEI 1028, despite being brighter and wider. Seen readily in averted, no color notes recorded.

 

Sh2-104 / Do 4

I didn't even realize this cluster/nebula was in the field until I viewed the simbad image. A web search turned up minimal information about the Dolidze 4 cluster, and it's not mentioned in the Night Sky Observers Guide, I'm guessing because it is sparse and faint. I did find an Astronomy.com page for Sharpless 2-104. I'm planning to return to the area this evening to see if any cluster like thing is lurking about. Will try on a better night from a darker site too.

 

ARY 1 / HR 7782

20h19m +37*07'

6.58/8.65 76.6" pa 257*

Attractive, wide, and bright in the 100XL with 10mm XW eyepieces, a blue white primary with a dusky orange companion. Also a fine double for 10x instruments mounted. I'm not sure the secondary could be seen hand holding, at least in a bright sky (from moonlight or light pollution). Anyway, it was wonderful in the Nikon 10x70 SP.

 

I also enjoyed an excellent view of the Double Double cluster in Perseus with the 100XL and 14mm XW eyepieces, easily the best instrument I have used to view that object. Just never get tired of looking at it with binocular telescopes.

 

Thank you for reading. flowerred.gif  


Edited by Fiske, 17 October 2021 - 06:56 AM.

  • Erik Bakker, Napp, duck2k and 5 others like this

#2137 Fiske

Fiske

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,353
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 16 October 2021 - 04:07 PM

Plus, I forgot to mention that at the beginning of the observing session an enormous owl swooped silently across my neighbor's driveway, brightly illuminated by the glare from his driveway light (either a Barred or Great Horned owl). While I was roaming about in Cepheus later with the 100XL a bright meteor flashed through the FOV. It is surprising how often that happens -- several times in the last few weeks alone. Also, skeins of geese, very high in the sky, drifted through binocular fields of view during the evening, looking ghostly in the moonlight, heading south. Only a few weeks ago I was running a fan to keep the mosquitoes at bay. Last night I was wearing a coat. grin.gif

 

Fiske


  • Corcaroli78, Thomas Marshall, Napp and 3 others like this

#2138 ECP M42

ECP M42

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,819
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: central Europe 45°N

Posted 16 October 2021 - 05:48 PM

But is it allowed to do bird watching and stargazing in the same session, considering that the main theme was weather comparisons? 

 

The other day the column marked 26 ° C and tonight it marks 16 ° C ... coldday.gif


  • Fiske likes this

#2139 Fiske

Fiske

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,353
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 16 October 2021 - 05:53 PM

I also observed NGC 457 in Cassiopeia, the Owl Cluster, so it's okay. wink.gif


  • Corcaroli78 and duck2k like this

#2140 ECP M42

ECP M42

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,819
  • Joined: 28 Apr 2021
  • Loc: central Europe 45°N

Posted 16 October 2021 - 06:25 PM

Right! waytogo.gif



#2141 duck2k

duck2k

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,749
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Fountain Hills, AZ

Posted 17 October 2021 - 02:35 AM

I have been a lazy observer - too lazy to use my bigger gear. Just been the 15x50 IS and a grav chair. Many objects of note, but in particular:

 

Cheshire Smile - the area of IC 417 (no nebulocity but many fainter stars anyway), M38 nearby and barely NGC 1907.

 

Cr 65, M1 (barely averted vision), and y Tau which is a beautiful carbon star.

 

M35

 

Cr 69 (I have split Meissa before with my 72mm frac), Sigma Orionis, NGC 1981, and the great nebula.

 

I look forward to Orion and Monoceros rising earlier, so I can use bigger gear for more objects of interest. Was a comfortable night.:)


  • Fiske, Mark9473, Napp and 2 others like this

#2142 ihf

ihf

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,484
  • Joined: 14 Jan 2019
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 17 October 2021 - 07:30 AM

Traveling with the 20x100 and the ACF6. Stopped at the Holiday Inn Tehachapi for the night at the north end of town. Still some street lights, but away from the center. Took a quick look mostly to compare skies. This one is listed yellow, but is the very high desert. Transparency was excellent, unlike the thin, high layer that often glows near the coast reflecting the bright red pollution back. Of course a near full moon. Andromeda was visible, but only the core and it looked pretty much like M13 (egg yolk without white). Tried a few more targets. I thought the sky was pretty engaging but still lacking in detail. After that I studied light pollution maps. The good news is that villages in Europe still have access to less light pollution than this. Western civilization in the US really likes to light up the desert. Oh, well. Time to join the Diné?


  • duck2k, j.gardavsky and aznuge like this

#2143 j.gardavsky

j.gardavsky

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,531
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2019
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 17 October 2021 - 10:10 AM

Yesterday night has offered crystal clear skies, in spite of the waxing gibbeous Moon 86%, but still low above the horizon.

 

The targets for my 10.5x70 binoculars with the blue(RGB)CCD filters have been the molecular clouds in Andromeda-Lacerta. Some of these clouds, and some of the large scale compression flows (strems) became visible, circumstances given.

 

Not bad, after a period of cloudy skies,

JG


  • Fiske, Erik Bakker, duck2k and 2 others like this

#2144 celestronlover57

celestronlover57

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,514
  • Joined: 08 Jul 2017
  • Loc: Mississippi

Posted 17 October 2021 - 02:33 PM

I happen to have the Pentax 10 x 25  so I used them took at the waxing gibbous moon, Jupiter and Saturn.



#2145 Cestus

Cestus

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 602
  • Joined: 30 Jul 2019

Posted 17 October 2021 - 02:45 PM

I observed the moon for International Observe the Moon night.


  • Fiske and j.gardavsky like this

#2146 j.gardavsky

j.gardavsky

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3,531
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2019
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 17 October 2021 - 03:01 PM

I observed the moon for International Observe the Moon night.

Yes,

the Moon has been wonderful.

But I am a bit late with my observing program for this autumn, and so I have used the time to find and to see the "molecular smudges" in the skies.

 

Clear skies,

JG



#2147 Fiske

Fiske

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4,353
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 17 October 2021 - 06:15 PM

I observed the moon for International Observe the Moon night.

There is an international observe the moon night?

 

hmm.gif

 

If that was last night, I'm in luck. I began my evening comparing views of the moon with an OB 15x70 Ultra, APM 16x70 ED MS, OB 20x65ED Deluxe, and an APM 20x80 ED MS. The two x70 instruments were my favorites, with the APM 16x70 taking first place for providing a relaxed, crisp, perfectly corrected view. Not sure why the 20x binoculars didn't fair better. I started observing before twilight and it wasn't full dark before the moon ascended into neighboring trees, so perhaps atmospheric conditions weren't amenable to the higher magnifications.

 

Fiske


  • Thomas Marshall, duck2k and j.gardavsky like this

#2148 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,015
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 18 October 2021 - 01:11 AM

Not precisely last night, but two nights ago -the last clear night- o observed the Zenith area using UHC and O-III filters attached to the TS 10x50 (BA8). it was interesting to "blink" the views and compare how the Ring nebula appears and disappears or seeing the increasing contrast in the Dumbell nebula. 

 

I closed this experimental session with the North America nebula and the Veil. It was short but rewarding!!

 

Carlos


  • j.gardavsky and aznuge like this

#2149 duck2k

duck2k

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1,749
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2015
  • Loc: Fountain Hills, AZ

Posted 18 October 2021 - 02:50 PM

I used my Obie 82 BT's and my 161MK2B. Oboe 14mm eyepieces used. The objects were basically the same as in my previous post with a few exceptions.

Cheshire Smile - the faintest stars in the IC 417 area were a little more defined. Better view of M38; able to make out NGC 1907.

M37: Saw the red star in the center. A ruby in a sea of diamonds.

Because of the moon, could not really see M1.

Y Tau: Definitely blood red and beautiful.

Split Almach, enjoyed NGC 1647/1746.

Caroline's Rose looked a little more defined.

Good session. smile.gif


Edited by duck2k, 18 October 2021 - 10:52 PM.

  • Fiske, Thomas Marshall, j.gardavsky and 1 other like this

#2150 astronomus1930

astronomus1930

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 101
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018

Posted 18 October 2021 - 09:37 PM

Though the moon was nearly full tonight, I thought I'd use my Oberwerk 15x70 DeLuxe to observe Jupiter and the nearby stars of Capricorn- 42, 44, 45, Deneb Algedi [delta] & Nashira [gamma]. 

Jupiter [and Saturn] were naked eye but given Capricorn's position directly over downtown Chicago, NONE of its stars were naked eye.  

 

Though the stars weren't visible, I knew they were there. So the challenge before me was to trace out the stars that make up the kite-shaped constellation. And taking a cue from previous CN post, I masked the binoculars down to 50 mm which reduced the moon's glare noticeably. Starting with Deneb Algedi [delta], I got as far as 36 where my charts showed a chain of stars cutting through the northern half of the constellation. The 14 stars I counted in the chain extended nearly 15 degrees and included stars > 7th magnitude. In heavy light pollution and a nearly-full moon, this was great!

 

Returning to Deneb Algedi [delta], I traced out the top of the constellation through Algedi [alpha 1 & 2] and Dabih [beta 1 & 2]. Then down to Rho, Pi and-  the night's highlight- Omicron, a binary separated by 22". 

 

Sessions like this one bring satisfaction beyond words...


  • Fiske, Napp, Carbstone and 1 other like this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics