Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

What did you see last night in your binoculars? (Part 3)

  • Please log in to reply
2466 replies to this topic

#2276 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 18 January 2022 - 11:03 PM

Two days ago I saw the same sunspots as post 2274, but uniformly shifted across the face of the sun from left to right.

 

Today at lunchtime I saw 6 sunspots all seemingly different again.  They appear to again be emerging from the left limb. There are 4 in a rectangular shape close to the left limb and a further two closer to the centre. They kind of resemble the Big Dipper. 
 

I’m trying to keep a regular eye on the sun, because now that we have sunspots on a regular basis again we can actually watch the sun spin on it’s axis.

 

Plus it always seems cloudy by nightfall so a bit of solar observing is all I got.

 

grin.gif CS everyone.


  • Napp and aznuge like this

#2277 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 22 January 2022 - 06:34 PM

In the very early a.m. I saw the ISS appear at 55* in the WNW and was ready to train the canon 18x50 IS binoculars. Since the station was zooming into the “morning” it was being illuminated from it’s front as it’s coming towards me. Consequently it was over exposed with the 50mm aperture and I could tell it had a box like shape you get to see a heck of lot more detail in the early evening when it is backlit.  I wasn’t able to see the solar panels separate from the central structure of the ISS.  The view was cut short by clouds.
 

Solar observing has likewise been a bit hit and miss due to overcast conditions so it’s hard to know if the changes in sunspot patterns are due to sunspot evolution or the sun turning on it’s axis.

 

CS everyone.


  • Fiske and Napp like this

#2278 Pinewood

Pinewood

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,645
  • Joined: 07 Dec 2004
  • Loc: 40.77638º N 73.982652 W

Posted 22 January 2022 - 07:10 PM

Hello,

 

Wednesday morning, around 6AM, the radio [remember radio?]  announcer mentioned a nearly full moon in the west.  I headed for my western window andI grabbed my nearest binocular, a 7x50, which showed clear maria and a little irregularity at the limbs, but there was light cloud.  I then found my 12x, fixes on a monopod and caught even more detail.

 

This morning, I got an even better view of the waning moon, as it was clear, using a WWII 7x50, a Dialyt 7x42 and an IOR 7x40.  The sixteen year-old Dialyt was the best followed by the IOR, of similar age.  An email correspondent thinks that the IOR, regarded as a clone of the Zeiss Jena 7x40, has has higher center sharpness.

 

Some morning I will use a modern 7x50, the Dialyt and the IOR.

 

Stay safe,

Arthur


  • Fiske, Corcaroli78, Napp and 1 other like this

#2279 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11,878
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 23 January 2022 - 12:04 PM

Well, I actually saw this the night before last--it was the plume from an Atlas V Centaur fuel dump.  I used my Canon 12x36 IS II's.  Report and sketch are here:

 

https://www.cloudyni...ten/?p=11655055


  • Fiske, Napp, CAAD9 and 2 others like this

#2280 Fiske

Fiske

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,022
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 23 January 2022 - 12:09 PM

Well, I actually saw this the night before last--it was the plume from an Atlas V Centaur fuel dump.  I used my Canon 12x36 IS II's.  Report and sketch are here:

 

https://www.cloudyni...ten/?p=11655055

Wow!!

 

bow.gif bow.gif bow.gif


  • Special Ed likes this

#2281 Pinewood

Pinewood

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,645
  • Joined: 07 Dec 2004
  • Loc: 40.77638º N 73.982652 W

Posted 23 January 2022 - 04:20 PM

Hello,

 

 

Some morning I will use a modern 7x50, the Dialyt and the IOR.

 

Stay safe,

Arthur

Hello,

 

More than an hour before dawn, at the end of astronomical twilight, I saw the waning moon through the Dialyt, the IOR, and a Zeiss 7x50, called either a Nautic or a Marine, as well as the eighty two year old Navy veteran.    With each glass, I could make our maria and craters.  The Nautic was top but the Dialyt was just a little poorer and so much handier than any 7x50.  

 

If I were to actually leave my home, I might take my 12x50 on a monopod, even though I have a 15x60 on a tripod.  I like to use handheld binoculars and my limit for a steady view, for any object much above the horizon is 7x.  Walking to a park with darker skies, I would use the 12x50 and one of the binoculars mentioned above.  For ease of use and good viewing, I think the Dialyt is my best choice.  This Dialyt has a long history, going back to the Hensoldt night glass, but its final iteration with phase coating and multi-coating was and remains an extraordinary combination of optical, mechanical, and ergonomics.  

 

Stay safe,

Arthur


  • Mark9473 and CAAD9 like this

#2282 astronomus1930

astronomus1930

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 124
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018

Posted 23 January 2022 - 11:30 PM

The other night my Bortle 8/9 skies had good transparency [3 on the AL scale] along with a tolerable temperature in the mid teens.

So it was to be Dueces Wild night: how many of Gemini's doubles were to be within the grasp of my Oberwerk 15x70 DeLuxe?

ID                 Mags          PA   Separation Arc Sec.    Comment
STF 1007       7.4/7.7      28             68
STF 1090       7.3/8.2      99             60
STF 1102       7.4/8.0     131          112                      Observed A & D stars, others beyond reach
STTA 89         6.8/7.7       83            77

S 524             7.2/7.4     244            53
STTA 77         4.1/8.0     330         111
HD 46452 &

HD 46467      8.0/8.1   ~200       ~150                       I believe this pair are merely line-of sight
  
 
If you’ve got >4 degree FOV, you can see all three of these pairs together!

 

On nights like this there is no cold, there is no light pollution- there's just pure contentment. 

 

Clear Skies!


Edited by astronomus1930, 23 January 2022 - 11:30 PM.

  • Fiske, Napp, CAAD9 and 3 others like this

#2283 Fiske

Fiske

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,022
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 23 January 2022 - 11:43 PM

Well done, Astro! A fine report and list of double stars. waytogo.gif

 

Here is a Gemini double to try if you have not already observed it.

 

STF 924 / 20 Geminorum

06h32m +17*47'

6.31/6.88 19.9" 212*


  • astronomus1930 likes this

#2284 astronomus1930

astronomus1930

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 124
  • Joined: 30 Aug 2018

Posted 24 January 2022 - 10:38 AM

Well done, Astro! A fine report and list of double stars. waytogo.gif

 

Here is a Gemini double to try if you have not already observed it.

 

STF 924 / 20 Geminorum

06h32m +17*47'

6.31/6.88 19.9" 212*

I have not seen this one- the separation will be a bit of a challenge but that's half the fun!

As always, thanks Fiske


  • Fiske likes this

#2285 Ray85

Ray85

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 28
  • Joined: 25 May 2021
  • Loc: Germany

Posted 24 January 2022 - 06:14 PM

I just came from my observing site in the Black Forest (Borte 4/5), Germany, and had the Kowa Highlander Flourite with me. The conditions were very quite good, no clouds, no wind. My observing site is about 900m above sea level, it was about -2 degrees Celsius. One great thing about stargazing in the Black Forest is, I get a strong dose of fresh cold forest air - fantastic :-) I observed a few standard objects. M42, currently relatively high in the sky, gorgeous. I was able to see lots of detail in the nebula and the 4 trapezoidal stars were no problem at 32x. I think I observed only M42 for at least 15 minutes. It just looks so pretty. M41 also very nice, needle fine stars. At Sirius I could test again the optical quality of the Highlander. In the center of the fov I get a super sharp image without any color fringes. Sirius is whitish-blue, this is how you break your dark adaption :-) Panning to the far edge of the image I see little bit of a small blue color fringe, and the sharpness decreases a bit. Absolutely irrelevant to me, since the center of the image is where the music plays (for me). Antares and Betelgeuse were also crisp and extremely strong in their color hue. M1 was a small washed out spot, but very distinct. M44 beautiful and M45 as well, although for my taste 32x is almost too much magnification for M45. The Highlander amazes me every time with its image quality and contrast. Stars look razor sharp. Great thing! NGC 2244 I had also looked at, but I could not catch any nebula details of NGC 2237. 


  • Fiske, Mark9473, Thomas Marshall and 6 others like this

#2286 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,119
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 25 January 2022 - 02:20 AM

I just came from my observing site in the Black Forest (Borte 4/5), Germany, and had the Kowa Highlander Flourite with me. The conditions were very quite good, no clouds, no wind. My observing site is about 900m above sea level, it was about -2 degrees Celsius. One great thing about stargazing in the Black Forest is, I get a strong dose of fresh cold forest air - fantastic :-) I observed a few standard objects. M42, currently relatively high in the sky, gorgeous. I was able to see lots of detail in the nebula and the 4 trapezoidal stars were no problem at 32x. I think I observed only M42 for at least 15 minutes. It just looks so pretty. M41 also very nice, needle fine stars. At Sirius I could test again the optical quality of the Highlander. In the center of the fov I get a super sharp image without any color fringes. Sirius is whitish-blue, this is how you break your dark adaption :-) Panning to the far edge of the image I see little bit of a small blue color fringe, and the sharpness decreases a bit. Absolutely irrelevant to me, since the center of the image is where the music plays (for me). Antares and Betelgeuse were also crisp and extremely strong in their color hue. M1 was a small washed out spot, but very distinct. M44 beautiful and M45 as well, although for my taste 32x is almost too much magnification for M45. The Highlander amazes me every time with its image quality and contrast. Stars look razor sharp. Great thing! NGC 2244 I had also looked at, but I could not catch any nebula details of NGC 2237. 

Hi Ray85

 

Very nice report of your observation!. I still miss the Black Forest skies in autumm/ Winter  (i studied in Offenburg), and remember going to the camping areas in between the vineyards to have dark skies with my 10x50 at that time. That was probably my best time in life observing the night sky!

 

Carlos


  • Fiske, CAAD9, Ray85 and 1 other like this

#2287 Fiske

Fiske

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,022
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 25 January 2022 - 02:24 AM

Ray and Carlos, it sounds amazing! waytogo.gif

 

I believe Erik Bakker has mentioned observing from the Black Forest, as well. 


  • Ray85 likes this

#2288 MT4

MT4

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,440
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 25 January 2022 - 02:34 AM

Very nice report Ray!

 

It reminds me that I need to get reacquainted with my own Kowa Highlander Prominar now that I've got a new pair of astronomy glasses that finally properly address my astigmatism problem.  Just can't wait to see how much better the view in the Kowa will be with my new glasses.

 

Too bad AccuWeather.com says that Tokyo's weather will be "increasing cloudy and chilly" tonight.   Chilly I can deal with, not so much "cloudy" :-)


  • happylimpet and Ray85 like this

#2289 Corcaroli78

Corcaroli78

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,119
  • Joined: 04 Jan 2009
  • Loc: 55N, 9E, Denmark

Posted 25 January 2022 - 04:22 AM

Not the last night, but last Friday we had clear skies here in Denmark, a freezing night with steady atmosphere. I took the Zeiss 10x50 to look at the Hyades. the 7,3 degree view cover entirely the V shaped asterism. As the night was promissory, i brought outside the Helios 15x70. I observed the Crab nebula and was surprised by the intense fierce orange hue of Aldebaran which to me looked more intense than Betelgeuse.

 

The Double cluster was near the zenith, so i observed Cygnus, Taurus, Auriga and finished the 1 hour observation trying to find the Rosetta Nebula. I just detected the cluster, but next time i will mount the filters to have a better view.

 

A short, rewarding cold night. 

 

Carlos   


  • Fiske, Napp, CAAD9 and 6 others like this

#2290 MT4

MT4

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,440
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 29 January 2022 - 09:32 AM

It's pretty cloudy tonight with temperature being in the mid 30's (F), but I wanted to check out Orion in my Nikon 18x70.  I am glad to report that thanks to my new astronomy glasses which have better astigmatism correction the view was far cleaner than I remembered.  That the new glasses sitting low on my nose bridge gave me back some 1mm+ of eye relief was extra icing on the cake, especially on an instrument such as the Nikon 18x70 which has pretty tight eye relief.

 

Now I've found myself wondering how much more enjoyable the view would be if I had a nice p-mount such as the Artesky one.  It's some 550 EUR plus international shipping and taxes, but if it can effortlessly handle the Kowa Highlander then it can handle all my binos with ease.  (I know I am talking myself into hitting the Order button :-))

https://www.teleskop...Telescopes.html

 

 

Edit:   After watching a video showing the Artesky p-mount effortlessly handling a Kowa Highlander I couldn't resist so have put in an order.

https://www.youtube....h?v=9OvGrCHrr5I


Edited by MT4, 29 January 2022 - 07:51 PM.

  • Fiske, Corcaroli78, CAAD9 and 1 other like this

#2291 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 29 January 2022 - 09:13 PM

La Niña is still the predominant weather influence here (which means above average rainfall) however after raining most of the day we had a couple of hours of mostly cloud free skies. It had the clear quality with the dust particles washed away.  Perfect opportunity for a tour of the Southern Milky Way.  Bortle 6 skies so can’t really perceive the MW but mainly the open clusters there in.  Binoculars were handheld 18x50 image stabilised. 
 

Started the southeast with crux emerging from the goo, the first open cluster observed was ngc 4463 (7.5mg) it’s a patch of sparkly nebulosity heading towards the south celestial pole from Acrux.  I tried to find ngc 4249 which is inside the cross itself but at 7.7mg I’m not sure if I saw it, but I was looking at its spot where there is a row of 3 6-7mg stars.

 

Moving up (north) one comes to ngc 4103 (7.25mg) which is like a grey patch surrounded by some stars.  One’s gaze then drifts further up and we get to the Pearl Cluster aka ngc 3766 aka C97.  This one is a real beauty and demands careful observing. I counted 7 maybe 8 distinct stars but it’s because they’re amongst a very pretty sparkly nebulosity which itself is just its sibling stars. There is no gas in this cluster.  Sometimes one of these fainter stars briefly comes into focus so it’s hard to tell how many distinct stars were seen. 
 

Drifting further north and a little to the east one sees ngc 3532 aka C91 aka Pincushion cluster, I have it in my head it’s also known as the football cluster.  It’s anchored by the 4 magnitude X carinae, it is my vote for the most beautiful cluster of all. There at least 50-60 individuals arrayed in a roughly NFL football like shape. In addition there is brilliant glow of who knows how many fainter stars. Again these come into focus fleetingly so when I tried to count the stars but it’s overwhelming. But this also gives it a really magical quality it’s as if the cluster is alive.

 

Next to 3532 moving towards the south again are meant to be three more open clusters 3572(6.8mg), 3590(8.4mg) & 3603(9.3mg). It’s impossible to tell them apart distinctly. It just looks like a broad patch of sky with an increased number of subtle stars and star glow. But I can’t really say I could see one or the other one of them.  Further to towards the South celestial pole is I came to the southern Pleiades aka ic 2602 aka C102. It’s brightest star is naked eye and the rest is about a dozen distinct stars visible in the binoculars. I don’t know, it looks kind of plain.   
 

Moving back to the east I could see some gaseous nebulosity in the eta carinae nebula and of course the red super giant star of the same name. Further to the east and north (up from my vantage point) is the compact 3293 I described in another post and then finally ngc3114. Which is a broad pumpkin shaped open cluster with scores of stars and background star glow. On other days I have seen the shape as a small stellar pool with 4 streams of stars falling out of it like a waterfall. On another night I saw it as a clenched fist.  
 

With the binoculars triggering the 5 minutes cut out for the 3ed or 4th time, one more look, straight up at Sirius and M41. I had to include a Messier on the night. 
 

At some point one has to end the mosquitoes feast and go inside and get some zzz.  
 

Clear skies.


Edited by CAAD9, 29 January 2022 - 09:17 PM.

  • Fiske, Symui, duck2k and 3 others like this

#2292 Fiske

Fiske

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5,022
  • Joined: 14 Mar 2004
  • Loc: Kansas (Kansas City area) / USA

Posted 29 January 2022 - 11:07 PM

Great report, Caad9. Thank you for sharing! waytogo.gif

 

I guess it is summer now in Australia? Have you tried an electric fan to beat the mosquitoes? One of my go to strageties during the summer here.

 

Fiske


Edited by Fiske, 29 January 2022 - 11:10 PM.

  • CAAD9 likes this

#2293 Symui

Symui

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 205
  • Joined: 28 Mar 2008
  • Loc: 37.9,-121.9 - Northern California

Posted 30 January 2022 - 12:05 AM

Thanks CAAD9, I enjoyed reading your observing report.  My location is +37 so I can't see most of the objects you listed and it's great to hear about them. 

 

You live in one of the most beautiful places in the world for astronomy.  Thanks for your post !!


Edited by Symui, 30 January 2022 - 12:11 AM.

  • CAAD9 likes this

#2294 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 30 January 2022 - 12:41 AM

Great report, Caad9. Thank you for sharing! waytogo.gif

 

I guess it is summer now in Australia? Have you tried an electric fan to beat the mosquitoes? One of my go to strageties during the summer here.

 

Fiske

Fiske, you are full of great ideas.  I’ll have to actually buy a fan believe it or not. That’s because like most houses in Queensland we have a/c, ceiling fans and fly screens on all the windows and doors. 
 

Thank you both for the nice comments. Very kind. 



#2295 RichD

RichD

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2,173
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2007
  • Loc: Derbyshire, UK

Posted 30 January 2022 - 10:38 AM

We have had excellent conditions lately here in the uk. High pressure, clear skies and light winds and no moon.
Friday night was the best of the lot, very transparent but not too cold and very dry air.
All the usual winter objects, M42, M35, Double cluster, M31, M41 and ngc 2362. This was mainly with a 5" MCT but alongside were my fuji 10x50 and a mounted 30x100, this pair is just great on M42, at times i could see a greenish tint and lots of detail. I ended up doing 3hrs plus on fri and sat night each, with no dew at all. That is quite rare in the uk this time of year. The most memorable couple of nights observing for a while.
  • Fiske, happylimpet, CAAD9 and 3 others like this

#2296 MickTaurus

MickTaurus

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 189
  • Joined: 24 Aug 2019
  • Loc: Norfolk/United Kingdom

Posted 30 January 2022 - 11:08 AM

We have had excellent conditions lately here in the uk. High pressure, clear skies and light winds and no moon.
Friday night was the best of the lot, very transparent but not too cold and very dry air.
All the usual winter objects, M42, M35, Double cluster, M31, M41 and ngc 2362. This was mainly with a 5" MCT but alongside were my fuji 10x50 and a mounted 30x100, this pair is just great on M42, at times i could see a greenish tint and lots of detail. I ended up doing 3hrs plus on fri and sat night each, with no dew at all. That is quite rare in the uk this time of year. The most memorable couple of nights observing for a while.

Agree RichD, was similar to last New Years Eve.

I also spent some time with my 25x100 Binoculars on M42, M31, and of course M45 Pleiades.

It was a couple of very good nights, lets hope for some more..


  • RichD likes this

#2297 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 31 January 2022 - 09:43 AM

I didn’t have any observing plans last night.  However as I was taking the garbage out after the Australian Open tennis final finally ended well after midnight I noticed the skies were crystal clear despite the day’s mixed weather.  Quick look with the image stabilised 18x50 won’t hurt.

 

As I said, no plans so no preparation.  Just a quick gaze from the back deck which faces south.  Started at Orion setting in the west then backtracking to my left (east) through the MW.  It was at a higher elevation than the night before so everything looked just a little bit better.  Through Canis Major the wonderful Mel ( number escapes me) then further across I came to the second bright star west of the False Cross. The star being Naos, not that I could name it in the moment. However I knew two interesting open clusters reside close to it.  Ngc 2477 and Ngc 2451.  The former can be quite hard in a suburban sky. It’s 5-6 mag, but defuse and no really bright anchor stars. It comes across as a grey patch (20-30 arc minutes across) that averted imagination can trick you into thinking you’re seeing sparkly stars. 2451 on the other hand is dominated by clearly visible row of stars that looks like an exaggerated “5” with an elongated bottom hook.  Further across the MW you get to the False Cross, which is half in Vela and half in Carina.  Under the darker skies the western Vela star is guarded by the naked eye open cluster IC 2391 aka C85. You can maybe make it out naked eye in the burbs, but it really sticks out in the 18x binos. Likewise the western Carinae star is guarded by ngc 2516 aka C96. Remember this was unplanned so I’m only going for the obvious objects that I remember.

 

Further along to the east I stumbled on the globular cluster ngc 2808, which is a relatively compact but clearly GC shape with solid middle core spreading out into nebulous fuzziness.  This reminded me to have a quick re-examination of globular cluster ngc 3201 aka C79 in Vela.  To see if the higher elevation would improve viewing compared to a couple of nights ago. I suppose it did, but it is such a faint grey patch that unless you’re looking for it may not be found. On the way back down (towards the south celestial pole) I came across 3 stars of around 8 magnitude that made an equilateral triangle, with vague hints of other faint stars around and some nebulosity maybe and a few other stars off to the side.  This seemed like an open cluster. Turns out to be ngc 3228.  That was kind of cool to identify something new to me.

 

Back along the Milky Way, looked again at last night’s open clusters. Btw, the open cluster inside Crux I reported as not seen was ngc 4349 not 4249 as originally stated. Sorry, twas a typo. Thanks for questioning that Fiske.  Despite the clearly better viewing I still don’t think I saw it.  

 

As the southern pointers were a decent way out of the goo, I tried to find the open cluster that is in between Alpha and Beta Centauri. I think I saw it actually. Unlike the canon 10x42L the 18x tfov of 3.7* allows the viewer to keep the bright stars out of fov thereby revealing ngc 5617. It’s just a collection of stars. 
 

With both Crux and the pointers this high up, that means Omega Centauri. Under dark skies it’s naked eye and you don’t really bother remembering where it is. I had to hunt around a little to find it in the 18x50.  But there is was finally. It is so much bigger than any other glob, tonight’s 2808 for example.  So, then the thought struck me, the runner up: 47 Tucanae.  You kind of triangulate it with where you guess the south celestial pole is and Canopus. Again out dark, you can’t miss it. In the burbs it’s a bit more pot luck. Eventually found it. Notwithstanding that it was deep in the goo at only about 15-20* elevation you can still tell it’s 47T because it’s way bigger than 2808. But it’s also in a totally smaller realm than Omega Cen.  These of course are better telescope targets.

 

Anyway, my 5 minutes turned into well over an hour. Oh no, it was still work tomorrow.  As I was about to get up the 3 stars that make up Canis Major tail and hind leg suddenly had 4 stars and the “new” one briefly brightened to rival Sirius. Holy Cow I had a tumbling satellite here. This was about 2 am so this had to be a high flyer. Found it quickly in the binoculars and was treated to very bright variable display.  Subsequent checks of Stellarium suggests it wasn’t a flaring Irridium satellite. I’m not sure what it was. But for about 15 seconds it put on a heck of a show. I kept it in sight for a few minutes while it traversed west to east through Carina.  But after the initial flurry it seemed to settle down somewhat.

 

Fun night. But i still had to get up early this morning. Now I’m wasted. Got to get to bed. Ciao.


  • Fiske, Corcaroli78, Thomas Marshall and 4 others like this

#2298 MT4

MT4

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,440
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 04 February 2022 - 07:45 AM

I just stepped out to my balcony to enjoy looking at Orion through my Kasai 2x54, which is the same as the Orion 2x54.  The view of Orion was great, as great as any 2x bino could ever be under my Bortle-9 skies.  Even with my glasses on, I could see all of Orion from Saiph on the lower-left corner to 2 Ori diagonally across.  Checking Stellarium, that's a distance of about 23.5 degrees.

 

Since I got the Kasai in May last year I hadn't used it much aside from using it in conjunction with my 50x82 Kowa Highlander Prominar as a 2x booster on bright targets such as Jupiter and Saturn.  Tonight I rediscovered the Kasai as the ultimate constellation bino, which of course is exactly what it's all about.  It was the humble O-rings that allowed me to safely use the Kasai with my glasses on and that made all the difference for my astigmatic eyes.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • Kasai 2x54.jpeg

  • Napp, CAAD9 and j.gardavsky like this

#2299 CAAD9

CAAD9

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,097
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2016
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 05 February 2022 - 10:35 PM

Still very wet around the East Coast of Australia. In between rain showers I did a quick look at the sun with 18x50IS binoculars plus home made solar filter (Baader solar film being the active ingredient).  There’s one central spot that has been there solidly for 3-4 days and a band of three groups of various spots seemingly in a lower equatorial band that have also been observed in the same time. I’m sort of trying to relate it to Jupiter.  I don’t know if that line of groups of sunspots is an equatorial band or not.

 

The left group, what I think is the Eastern most group, is no longer a group of black spots but just one black spot with a bunch of white washed out patches that just marginally contrast against the background face of the sun.  Yesterday this group was as thickly populated with black spots like the two other groups.  

 

I’m really ignorant of solar activity so forgive me if my rambling sounds silly. But it is fascinating to watch things change on the face of the sun.


  • Napp and BUDSBOY like this

#2300 MT4

MT4

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1,440
  • Joined: 05 Jun 2021
  • Loc: Tokyo, JP

Posted 05 February 2022 - 11:27 PM

Still very wet around the East Coast of Australia. In between rain showers I did a quick look at the sun with 18x50IS binoculars plus home made solar filter (Baader solar film being the active ingredient).  There’s one central spot that has been there solidly for 3-4 days and a band of three groups of various spots seemingly in a lower equatorial band that have also been observed in the same time. I’m sort of trying to relate it to Jupiter.  I don’t know if that line of groups of sunspots is an equatorial band or not.

 

The left group, what I think is the Eastern most group, is no longer a group of black spots but just one black spot with a bunch of white washed out patches that just marginally contrast against the background face of the sun.  Yesterday this group was as thickly populated with black spots like the two other groups.  

 

I’m really ignorant of solar activity so forgive me if my rambling sounds silly. But it is fascinating to watch things change on the face of the sun.

I’ve observed the sun many times using my 15x and 18x binos with a pair of Thousand Oaks 58mm solar filters.  My understanding is that sunspots come and go.  Sometimes there’s nothing to see other than an orange ball hanging in the sky.

 

In my experience, the best time to observe the sun through binos is when it’s a bit cloudy.   I’ve been treated to various optical illusions watching patches of clouds passing in front of the sun.  These illusions range from a spinning 3-D ball to a calm pond to a rough lake with violent waves moving fast from one side to another.


  • CAAD9 likes this


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics