Jump to content

  •  

CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

NOW AVAILABLE! Our New Explore Scientific iEXOS 100 PMC-Eight $399

  • Please log in to reply
506 replies to this topic

#451 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:35 PM

...but...  without this centering spacer, the mount head can slide laterally by about 1.3mm.  I resolved this issue by cutting a piece of 0.55mm styrene (presumably sold as .5mm...  it is just stuff I had lying around but it measures 0.55mm in thickness) to use as a spacer...

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSC03798 sept19_blog.JPG


#452 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:36 PM

Here is the strip of styrene inserted into the top hole of the tripod...

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSC03795 sept19_blog.JPG


#453 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 18 September 2019 - 07:42 PM

So now when I assemble the iEXOS-100, I do not use that plastic centering spacer.  Instead, I place my strip of styrene into the hole and then insert the mount head...  then tighten the bolt from the bottom holding the mount head onto the tripod.  The mount head now sits solidly on the top of the tripod.  My flexure is now gone. 

 

Of course, I still have the issue of no fine control of azimuth when using this tripod but it is much, much sturdier and solid. 

 

I hope this helps some others here.   

 

Patrick



#454 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 19 September 2019 - 07:57 AM

As I was thinking about this flexure issue after writing the above posts last night, I decided that showing a photo of the tripod in a way that clearly shows what part of the mount head is actually touching and supported by the tripod would be a good visual tool.  So, the tripod as shown in the photo below would be no more stable than the tripod as it ships with the iEXOS-100.  When you place the mount head on the top plate of the tripod, it only touches and is supported by the extruded part of the top part of the tripod depicted in this photo.  I don't think anyone here would even think about using a tripod top plate shaped like this even once yet that is exactly what we are doing when we insert that small plastic centering spacer to the top plate of the tripod.  The sides of the mount head are not supported by the tripod top plate at all.  This is what is causing the flexure in this mount.  There is nothing supporting the sides of the mount head.

 

The way to resolve this is to either produce a centering spacer with an outside diameter the same size as the top plate of the tripod (which is the same diameter as the mount head base) or to eliminate that centering washer and instead use a thin tube of material as I did in a photo above.  I used a strip of styrene but a short section of thin-walled metal tube could probably be produced instead.  Either of those two solutions would allow the entire solid base of the mount head to be firmly supported by the top plate of the tripod and subsequently eliminate the flexure experienced in this mount.

 

Patrick

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • DSC03823 sept19_blog.JPG


#455 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:51 AM

I also want to point out that minimizing the problem of flexure from this mount in no way eliminates my desire or need for the new azimuth adjuster adapter.  I'll still use that new adapter with my EXOS-2 tripod and on my pier.  I'm happy Explore Scientific is now offering this nice adapter and I'm happy that I purchased one.  It certainly helps with polar alignment.

 

However, for those times when I want to be portable and lightweight, fixing most of the flexure problem in the iEXOS-100 tripod is a significant improvement too and that is why I shared my experiences here.   The purpose of this mount is its portability and light weight.  Making it sturdier is a plus but that does not eliminate the need for the new azimuth adjuster adapter.  

 

Actually, if Explore Scientific could design and produce new azimuth adjuster adapter that fits on the iEXOS-100 tripod that would replace the current plastic centering spacer, I'd definitely purchase one of those too!

 

Patrick 


Edited by PatrickVt, 19 September 2019 - 10:53 AM.


#456 Jerry Hubbell

Jerry Hubbell

    Vendor-Explore Scientific

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 566
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Locust Grove, VA, USA

Posted 19 September 2019 - 11:48 AM

So now when I assemble the iEXOS-100, I do not use that plastic centering spacer.  Instead, I place my strip of styrene into the hole and then insert the mount head...  then tighten the bolt from the bottom holding the mount head onto the tripod.  The mount head now sits solidly on the top of the tripod.  My flexure is now gone. 

 

Of course, I still have the issue of no fine control of azimuth when using this tripod but it is much, much sturdier and solid. 

 

I hope this helps some others here.   

 

Patrick

Hi Patrick,

 

I passed your posts to Alex and he wanted to make sure that you had tightened the set screws in the side of the tripod head as shown in the picture in post  https://www.cloudyni...-399/?p=9653273 ?

 

Thanks



#457 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 19 September 2019 - 12:49 PM

Hi Jerry,

 

My tripod has only one set screw on the side of the top plate of the tripod.  I always assumed that was to help keep the mount from turning in azimuth after polar aligning and that is how I've used it.  What I have found, however, is that the single set screw just pushes the mount head in the opposite direction until there is friction which messes up some of the polar aligning I just painfully accomplished.  So, I've been placing the set screw on the opposite side of where the altitude knob is located so that it only affects the altitude slightly when it pushes the mount head backward a hair.  And, because there is only one set screw that tends to decenter the mount head, I've only been tightening the mount bolt that comes up from underneath and leaving the single set screw alone.  Even when tightening down the lone set screw at the 0° position, this still allows some wobble in the east-to-west axis because there is nothing underneath the east and west sides of the mount head to support it (as shown in the photos above).  

 

Now, I have always wondered why there aren't three set screws around the top plate of the tripod.  So, then, tightening each a little at a time would help keep the mount head from decentering (like we do with polar scopes) and three set screws would then help stabilize the mount (a bit) in the east-west axis.  That being said, I'm still bothered by stabilizing and supporting the mount head with just three set screws.  I admit that for lightweight short focal length loads, which is the purpose of this mount, that might be 'good enough'.  I'm rarely happy with 'good enough' though.  smile.gif    This is all a moot point, however, since there is only one set screw anyway and not three at 60° intervals.

 

Thanks again, Jerry.

 

Patrick



#458 Jerry Hubbell

Jerry Hubbell

    Vendor-Explore Scientific

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 566
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Locust Grove, VA, USA

Posted 19 September 2019 - 03:35 PM

Hi Jerry,

 

My tripod has only one set screw on the side of the top plate of the tripod.  I always assumed that was to help keep the mount from turning in azimuth after polar aligning and that is how I've used it.  What I have found, however, is that the single set screw just pushes the mount head in the opposite direction until there is friction which messes up some of the polar aligning I just painfully accomplished.  So, I've been placing the set screw on the opposite side of where the altitude knob is located so that it only affects the altitude slightly when it pushes the mount head backward a hair.  And, because there is only one set screw that tends to decenter the mount head, I've only been tightening the mount bolt that comes up from underneath and leaving the single set screw alone.  Even when tightening down the lone set screw at the 0° position, this still allows some wobble in the east-to-west axis because there is nothing underneath the east and west sides of the mount head to support it (as shown in the photos above).  

 

Now, I have always wondered why there aren't three set screws around the top plate of the tripod.  So, then, tightening each a little at a time would help keep the mount head from decentering (like we do with polar scopes) and three set screws would then help stabilize the mount (a bit) in the east-west axis.  That being said, I'm still bothered by stabilizing and supporting the mount head with just three set screws.  I admit that for lightweight short focal length loads, which is the purpose of this mount, that might be 'good enough'.  I'm rarely happy with 'good enough' though.  smile.gif    This is all a moot point, however, since there is only one set screw anyway and not three at 60° intervals.

 

Thanks again, Jerry.

 

Patrick

Thanks Patrick, I'll pass this on.


  • PatrickVt likes this

#459 PatrickVt

PatrickVt

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 273
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2018
  • Loc: Vermont, US

Posted 19 September 2019 - 08:38 PM

Jerry,

 

I need to apologize about some of what I wrote, above.  I could have sworn that I had originally used that one set screw on the top plate of the mount to secure the mount head in azimuth rotation but I must have been thinking of another mount or some other product.  I apologize.  Clearly, I was aware of that set screw but I confused that one set screw with something else on another product.

 

Upon closer inspection, tonight, I found that the lone set screw on my tripod seems to do absolutely nothing!  The hole does indeed go all the way through to the larger center hole where the mount head is inserted but the threads stop about 1/4" short of the end of the hole.  So, when I tighten down that set screw, it sets against nothing...   the set screw just sets in tight at the end of the threads in the hole.  

 

Clearly, I'm bouncing around between too many mounts and making too many parts myself (building a small observatory) and I think that is causing me to mix up different products in my head.  Everything else I wrote above is accurate.  It is just the purpose of the set screw.  But, as far as that goes, I'm even more more baffled now since I can't figure out its purpose.   

 

Oh, I checked the user manual and I did not see anything in the manual about this set screw either.  I checked before writing this time.  (I should have double checked everything before writing everything I wrote above!  Again, I apologize.)  

 

Patrick



#460 asanmax

asanmax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018

Posted 19 September 2019 - 09:34 PM

So there was finally a clear night in the city and I took that opportunity to shoot the Dumbbell Nebula for a couple of hours, as last session ended up abruptly with clouds coming in.

I was again impressed by the mount performance. Out of 68 frames I had to only delete two, one with the airplane light trails and the other one with egg stars.

Just look at the PHD2 screenshot, looks awesome for this little mighty mount.

Scope: Celestron C5 white tube, 125mm/1310mm.

Camera: Canon 450d

Guider: 37mm/130mm with AR0130 sensor.

66x120sec frames

Stacked in DSS, post processing in PhotoShop

Cropped about 60% of the full frame.

City sky, Bortle 7.

 

By the way, legs were almost fully extended.

Attached Thumbnails

  • PHD2_Snip.JPG
  • Final66x120.jpg

Edited by asanmax, 20 September 2019 - 12:31 AM.

  • eros312, Jerry Hubbell and zxx like this

#461 zxx

zxx

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1020
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2010

Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:03 PM

you know you can't do AP on a $400 mount, you should have bought the HEQ5 lol.gif 

 

Nice imagewaytogo.gif 


  • Jerry Hubbell likes this

#462 asanmax

asanmax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018

Posted 19 September 2019 - 10:10 PM

you know you can't do AP on a $400 mount, you should have bought the HEQ5 lol.gif

 

Nice imagewaytogo.gif

He he, true true. Thanks! Funny thing but before buying this mount I was actually considering the HEQ5 or CEM25P. So glad I went with iExos-100. It's doing well at 1310mm on a cropped camerashocked.gif bow.gif


Edited by asanmax, 19 September 2019 - 10:11 PM.

  • Jerry Hubbell and zxx like this

#463 Jerry Hubbell

Jerry Hubbell

    Vendor-Explore Scientific

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 566
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Locust Grove, VA, USA

Posted 20 September 2019 - 12:49 AM

He he, true true. Thanks! Funny thing but before buying this mount I was actually considering the HEQ5 or CEM25P. So glad I went with iExos-100. It's doing well at 1310mm on a cropped camerashocked.gif bow.gif

I have to admit, I didn't think I would see such performance out this mount at this focal length. It takes an excellent mount, but also a lot of skill to squeeze the performance out of the equipment. Great work asanmax!


  • zxx, Devonshire, PatrickVt and 1 other like this

#464 asanmax

asanmax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018

Posted 20 September 2019 - 09:53 AM

I have to admit, I didn't think I would see such performance out this mount at this focal length. It takes an excellent mount, but also a lot of skill to squeeze the performance out of the equipment. Great work asanmax!

I was not expecting that too, but curiosity brakes the boundaries :) The mount ran perfectly fine for 2.5 hours passing the meridian with no hiccups whatsoever. And hey, I'm still waiting to test it at a dark site, the weather has been ugly here recently.


  • Jerry Hubbell likes this

#465 wanthalf

wanthalf

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 07 Jul 2019

Posted 22 September 2019 - 06:15 AM

Hi Jerry, I am sorry to be the troublesome idiot who just cannot do even the simplest thing right, but obviously that is exactly what I am. So I got my mount and now finally tried to learn how to work with it. Of course I have typical beginner problems, but some just make me worry a bit more.

 

Well, what troubles me most is a problem with the motion on the RA axis to the "left": sometimes it gets blocked and makes a terrible noise of "movement in void". Obviously the mount does not know about the problem and still believes it is moving, because the physical alignment of the RA axis is completely lost at that moment. This seems to happen when the telescope is more or less on the right side and moving up, but not always and not always in the same position. The whole telescope with equipment weights just some 3.4kg (7.5lb) and seems to be just well balanced with both counterweights at the end of the shaft. Also, it only seems to happen at the full speed of "9" (both when slewing automatically or manually): when moving manually, as soon as I release the "LEFT" button and the mount starts slowing down to lower speeds in order to gradually stop its movement, it unblocks and moves again slightly before it actually stops. Am I doing something wrong or is it bad luck with some hardware issue? I do not really dare to experiment with the mechanics when the mount is new and covered by warranty.

 

Another question concerns the ExploreStars Android App. I thought I have read that the "LOAD GPS COORDINATES" button in the Settings loads the coordinates from the GPS in the mount (I have no GPS receiver in the Android device), but that does not seem to work and I had to enter the coordinates manually. Did I misunderstand something?

 

Unlike the description of the alignment process in the instruction manual: there is no "Align to this star" button in the Android App, but the scope starts to move immediately to the first star presented on the screen. So, I suppose I cannot choose the alignment star before moving the scope(?). Also it seems that I should then confirm the alignment by using the "Enter" button and not the "Sync" button in this App, is it correct?

 

Well, at this point I probably won't take out all the other strange problems of mine, but I was a bit surprised that pointing to the alignment stars was so much further away from their actual location than I expected (maybe by some 3-5˚ in both directions or even more?), even though the time and coordinates were correct and I believe the rough physical alignment was quite OK too. But maybe I am just wrong, I admit I had problems to actually see anything through the polar tunnel and I pointed to Polaris rather with the scope. Is this what I can expect from a rough (but still correct) polar alignment?



#466 Jerry Hubbell

Jerry Hubbell

    Vendor-Explore Scientific

  • *****
  • Vendors
  • topic starter
  • Posts: 566
  • Joined: 16 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Locust Grove, VA, USA

Posted 22 September 2019 - 07:50 AM

Hi Jerry, I am sorry to be the troublesome idiot who just cannot do even the simplest thing right, but obviously that is exactly what I am. So I got my mount and now finally tried to learn how to work with it. Of course I have typical beginner problems, but some just make me worry a bit more.

 

Well, what troubles me most is a problem with the motion on the RA axis to the "left": sometimes it gets blocked and makes a terrible noise of "movement in void". Obviously the mount does not know about the problem and still believes it is moving, because the physical alignment of the RA axis is completely lost at that moment. This seems to happen when the telescope is more or less on the right side and moving up, but not always and not always in the same position. The whole telescope with equipment weights just some 3.4kg (7.5lb) and seems to be just well balanced with both counterweights at the end of the shaft. Also, it only seems to happen at the full speed of "9" (both when slewing automatically or manually): when moving manually, as soon as I release the "LEFT" button and the mount starts slowing down to lower speeds in order to gradually stop its movement, it unblocks and moves again slightly before it actually stops. Am I doing something wrong or is it bad luck with some hardware issue? I do not really dare to experiment with the mechanics when the mount is new and covered by warranty.

 

Another question concerns the ExploreStars Android App. I thought I have read that the "LOAD GPS COORDINATES" button in the Settings loads the coordinates from the GPS in the mount (I have no GPS receiver in the Android device), but that does not seem to work and I had to enter the coordinates manually. Did I misunderstand something?

 

Unlike the description of the alignment process in the instruction manual: there is no "Align to this star" button in the Android App, but the scope starts to move immediately to the first star presented on the screen. So, I suppose I cannot choose the alignment star before moving the scope(?). Also it seems that I should then confirm the alignment by using the "Enter" button and not the "Sync" button in this App, is it correct?

 

Well, at this point I probably won't take out all the other strange problems of mine, but I was a bit surprised that pointing to the alignment stars was so much further away from their actual location than I expected (maybe by some 3-5˚ in both directions or even more?), even though the time and coordinates were correct and I believe the rough physical alignment was quite OK too. But maybe I am just wrong, I admit I had problems to actually see anything through the polar tunnel and I pointed to Polaris rather with the scope. Is this what I can expect from a rough (but still correct) polar alignment?

Hi Wanthalf,

 

No worries,  we will get you sorted. 

 

First, your mechanical problem sounds like there is a bit of binding of your RA worm/wheel gear going on as it sounds like frictional load exceeds the motor torque when the speed gets to the maximum. If you are not comfortable adjusting the mesh (doing this yourself does not impact the warranty) then you can send it to us for adjustment. But I would suggest you watch this video  https://youtu.be/mLXE_BMKVAw and see if you could make a small adjustment to help your problem. If you still want to send your mount back to us, please call our Customer Service at +1 (866) 252-3811 ext. 2. 

 

Yes, if your Android device does not have an internal GPS receiver then you will have to manually enter the Longitude and Latitude values in your tablet. Also in order to get the most accurate GOTOs, you need to make sure your tablet clock is set to the nearest second. 1 minute error in your clock time is equal to 1/4 degree off in pointing, so it is important to get the clock set correctly. Since you do not have a GPS receiver to set your clock, then you would rely on setting it via your Internet connection via a time server before switching your network connection over to the PMC-Eight network.

 

If you hit the MENU button and then go to the SETTINGS page you will see a button (AUTO ALIGN OFF/ON) that you can use to toggle the automatic slewing to an object if you would like to select your own object to slew to during the alignment process. When you have the AUTO ALIGN OFF, you will have to hit the GO TO button to go to each object you select. Yes, we have recently changed the description and the button when doing the alignment because the SYNC function is a distinctly different function from what we are doing during an alignment. During the alignment process, we are gathering data for each of the 2 or 3 alignment stars and not actually "Syncing" to the star, thus the change to ENTER on the button.

 

The amount of error in pointing when starting out that you report is not unreasonable. When you first set up your mount "close" to the North Celestial Pole (NCP) and close in altitude, this can amount to a couple of degrees of error. Also there are a couple of other errors that cause the initial slews to alignment stars to be off by the amount you are seeing including any home index position errors when you set your mounts home position and also cone error and time errors. The important thing to remember is to make sure you can positively identify the target alignment star even when the mount points it 3-5 degrees away so that you center the correct star prior to hitting the ENTER key. 

 

I hope this answers your questions, just stick with it, you will get better over time setting up your system.



#467 wanthalf

wanthalf

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 16
  • Joined: 07 Jul 2019

Posted 23 September 2019 - 05:46 AM

OK, I should give it a try. If tightening a screw or two could solve the problem and it would not have any issues anymore, that would be much more effective than returning the whole thing. Otherwise I would have to pass it back to the local dealer - sending it across the globe to the US would probably be quite expensive (compared to its price).

 

So, the mount does NOT have its own GPS receiver built in! I wonder what and where did I read that made me believe it has one.

 

Thanks for all the information and explanations, that is exactly a lot of things I wondered or was not sure about.



#468 JayScope

JayScope

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 17
  • Joined: 13 Feb 2009
  • Loc: VA

Posted 23 September 2019 - 01:31 PM

I agree with Jerry.  Actually, even when doing only visual observing, I never extend the legs on any of my mounts.  I have a small folding stool that I sit on to view.  I'd rather sit than stand anyway.   When doing imaging, it doesn't matter what height the scope is at as long as it (and the view through the telescope) clears all nearby obstacles.  The camera doesn't care how close it is to the ground.  So, I also recommend leaving the legs in the smallest, tightest configuration.  

 

Patrick

I'm considering this mount as my first GEM goto (upgrading from an Astrotrac AG) -- is it possible to mount this on a non-astro specific tripod? I'm a television producer (by trade) and have numerous very heavy-duty video tripods that use a 3/8" screw, that's what I use with my Astrotrac. Can you attach this mount the same way? Is there a 3/8" receiver underneath the mount?



#469 NWAAstronomer

NWAAstronomer

    Vendor (Explore Scientific)

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 12
  • Joined: 31 Oct 2018

Posted 23 September 2019 - 05:44 PM

I'm considering this mount as my first GEM goto (upgrading from an Astrotrac AG) -- is it possible to mount this on a non-astro specific tripod? I'm a television producer (by trade) and have numerous very heavy-duty video tripods that use a 3/8" screw, that's what I use with my Astrotrac. Can you attach this mount the same way? Is there a 3/8" receiver underneath the mount?

The mounting hole is M10x1.5 screw thread. It can be used with any screw adapter that has that thread.

I hope this answers your question.

 

Kent 



#470 burks

burks

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2019

Posted 25 September 2019 - 03:36 AM

Thoughts on this mount with a ST80mm and DSLR? I wouldn't mind a guide scope/camera in the near future (because frankly I absolutely suck at this hobby). This is sort of my "last chance" with this hobby before throwing in the towel. I can't even find anything, let alone capture it. Yes, I know AP isn't easy but I'd to "save my memories and accomplishments". 



#471 Devonshire

Devonshire

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 186
  • Joined: 10 Mar 2017
  • Loc: S/W Ontario, Canada

Posted 25 September 2019 - 11:23 AM

 

I can't even find anything, let alone capture it.

 

Plate solving fixes that.  Might be a little work to get it running, depending on your camera and software choices, but once running, it's magic.  And it lets you take pictures of things you can't see. :-)

 

-> Mount control software slews to where it thinks your desired target is (and gets close - maybe).

-> Plate solving software commands imaging camera to take a photo for it.

-> Plate solving software determines coordinates where the imaging camera is pointed, by analyzing stars in captured image.

-> Plate solving software compares those coordinates with the coordinates that the mount thinks it's pointed at.

-> Plate solving software commands mount to reposition to center on desired target.

-> Repeat until target is centered.

-> Plate solving software Syncs mount position.

-> You take the pictures you want.  :-)

 

I do this with just ASCOM, Astrotortilla, and BackYard Nikon, but there are other alternatives.  Usually takes about three tries over 3 or 4 minutes, and my target is nicely centered.  

 

- Bob



#472 b16707

b16707

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 248
  • Joined: 28 Jun 2018
  • Loc: California

Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:28 PM

somewhat of a tangent but just wanted to say that seeing all you pros get this mount working the way it has been working is very inspiring and with the constant support and involvement from Jerry direct from ES makes this a sure buy and absolute steal at the price for me once that polar scope hits. I cant wait. 


Edited by b16707, 26 September 2019 - 12:28 PM.


#473 asanmax

asanmax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018

Posted 26 September 2019 - 12:55 PM

somewhat of a tangent but just wanted to say that seeing all you pros get this mount working the way it has been working is very inspiring and with the constant support and involvement from Jerry direct from ES makes this a sure buy and absolute steal at the price for me once that polar scope hits. I cant wait. 

I have some reasonable doubts that the polar scope is necessary for AP using PHD2 guiding. I've had pretty good results with over 2 degrees misalignment in polar axis. Obviously, there's going to be some field rotation, but it does not affect the quality if the exposure time is kept below 150 seconds at over 1000mm focal length. Field rotation is noticeable if you compare the two subs taken 10 minutes apart. This has no affect on the final image at all, the object just needs to be centered properly.

Also, I can't see the Polaris from my backyard, so I tried doing drift alignment in PHD2 which was very easy to do. Now both RA and DEC lines are flat on the graph.

I'm sure eyeballing the polar alignment would work just fine when imaging at below 500mm with PHD2.

Without guiding, the polar scope would definitely be a good addition.



#474 b16707

b16707

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 248
  • Joined: 28 Jun 2018
  • Loc: California

Posted 26 September 2019 - 01:30 PM

Yea for me 

 

I have some reasonable doubts that the polar scope is necessary for AP using PHD2 guiding. I've had pretty good results with over 2 degrees misalignment in polar axis. Obviously, there's going to be some field rotation, but it does not affect the quality if the exposure time is kept below 150 seconds at over 1000mm focal length. Field rotation is noticeable if you compare the two subs taken 10 minutes apart. This has no affect on the final image at all, the object just needs to be centered properly.

Also, I can't see the Polaris from my backyard, so I tried doing drift alignment in PHD2 which was very easy to do. Now both RA and DEC lines are flat on the graph.

I'm sure eyeballing the polar alignment would work just fine when imaging at below 500mm with PHD2.

Without guiding, the polar scope would definitely be a good addition.

for me guiding is out of the question at the moment as im a relative newbie when it comes to all of this (plus it adds to the overall $$). Semething for me to look forward to in the future and im glad that this mount is future-proof in that sense.



#475 asanmax

asanmax

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 88
  • Joined: 17 Sep 2018

Posted 26 September 2019 - 02:14 PM

Yea for me 

 

for me guiding is out of the question at the moment as im a relative newbie when it comes to all of this (plus it adds to the overall $$). Semething for me to look forward to in the future and im glad that this mount is future-proof in that sense.

Well, guiding is not that hard to do. It is intimidating but once you start there is really no way back. If you're a DIY person, you can assemble a guide scope for about $50 US.

Here is the lens:

https://www.surpluss...tem/L10807.html

Just buy any camera with the AR0130 sensor off amazon. I used this one, it's only $52 CAD:

https://www.amazon.c...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I was initially aiming to not spend a lot of money on my grab-and-go setup, that's why I went the DIY way and proved it could work with the desired precision.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.


Recent Topics






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics