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A new atlas?

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#1 N3p

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 06:14 PM

Hi, I am thinking about getting a new atlas for 2019. I currently use the Cambridge Double Star atlas which I like, I think it's a very good general atlas with many doubles obviously. But I would like to know if there could be another one with more stars (to help me star hop) more NGC listed,  that is fun and effective to use.

 

Cambridge has many NGC objects but occasionally I add new ones from Stellarium (that are visible with a small telescope) and that makes me wonder, perhaps there is a more advanced and specialized atlas for DSOs, I use a 8" newtonian.

 

It has to be a physical book strong enough for the humidity of the field of course. (no screens on the field for me)

 

If you have a favorite book, I'd be glad to know. smile.gif

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 



#2 lphilpot

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 07:08 PM

Toshimi Taki's 8.5 mag atlas: http://www.geocities.jp/toshimi_taki/

 

Download it free, go to FedEx/Kinkos, print it, spiral bind it, use it in the field. Great atlas. He also has a nice 6.5 atlas and a double star atlas as well.


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#3 bill5wjw

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 08:12 PM

Check out the laminated version of 'Sky Atlas', by Wil Tirion and Roger Sinnott.


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#4 N3p

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 09:57 PM

Thanks for your suggestions, I am looking at Taki's website right now, what a great old style website.

 

Sky Atlas seems like a hard one to find laminated.



#5 starblue

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Posted 16 December 2018 - 10:22 PM

I would rate the Interstellarum Deep Sky Atlas (IDSA) the new (book-based) star atlas "standard". It's replaced my Uranometrias, which would be my second choice. The IDSA comes in 2 forms, "desk" and "field". The actual contents are the same in both atlases. The "desk" edition pages are regular cardstock (you could use them outdoors and won't be destroyed by dew, but they're not dew-resistant), while the "field" edition uses plastic pages that are waterproof and clearly meant to be used outdoors. The big deal with the IDSA is that each object plotted is rated for its visibility in 4", 8", 12", or >12" scopes--bright objects are in bold font, medium objects are regular font, and dim ones are in thinner fonts, so you can tell in an instant whether you are likely to spot an object or not in *your* scope. The selection categories aren't perfect but still pretty darn convenient and useful. And it's a beautiful star atlas just to look at.

 

Don't ignore the usefulness of computerized star atlases, either ("planetarium" programs) for your phone or tablet. Sky Safari Is the leading one here, but there are other ones too, like Luminos. There are also simple apps like the TriAtlas that can be downloaded to your tablet, but it's just the paper book on your mobile device, and doesn't take advantage of any of your device's capabilities to plan or record observations, plot comet paths, predict eclipses, or many other things. 

 

These don't have to be mutually exclusive categories. I use the IDSA inside for planning DSO observations and SS for more transient events, then use them outside at the scope, where the IDSA makes its clearer what's usefully observable around my current sky location while SS can actually simulate the exact eyepiece view (including mirror flips or inversions) making star-hopping a breeze.

 

 


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#6 bill5wjw

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 08:52 AM

Thanks for your suggestions, I am looking at Taki's website right now, what a great old style website.

 

Sky Atlas seems like a hard one to find laminated.

Try the Cambridge website. Laminated version is pricey- I paid about $100 in 2012.

 But it’s worth every penny when you need it and everything is covered in dew.



#7 JuergenB

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 09:38 AM

I find myself using the Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas more often than the Sky Atlas 2000.0 because of its convenient size and completeness. It will not break the bank either.

 

Juergen


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#8 clearwaterdave

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 10:20 AM

I second the Interstellarum atlas.,This is a lifetime investment.,and this atlas is worth the price 10x.,imho.,Can't be beat for starhoppin.(9.5mag),and it has color.,not just black on white which makes it a bit more pleasent to look at.,

  The newly released guide for this atlas has lots of nice color pics of the selected objects.,but unfortunely little to no information about them.,again.,imho.,good luck with your choices.,



#9 25585

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 11:27 AM

Thanks for your suggestions, I am looking at Taki's website right now, what a great old style website.

 

Sky Atlas seems like a hard one to find laminated.

I bought mine direct from Sky Publishing. Have both the deluxe and black background. The 2nd edition includes Hipparchos as well as Tycho mapped stars.

 

But Interstellarum is now my favourite. It specifies sizes of scope needed to see objects, has some carbon stars and good colour coding. Great next step up from pocket atlases.



#10 N3p

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 12:57 PM

Interstellarum looks very nice, but it's worth way too much. I'll look at the other options tonight.



#11 brentknight

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Posted 17 December 2018 - 02:44 PM

If price is an issue for you (for me too), then maybe Uranometria 2000 Second Edition will do: http://www.willbell.com/u2k/index.htm

 

I don't know that I'd take this one outside though, but it is a very good atlas.  I have the First Edition Uranometria, but prefer the IDSA these days...

 

For a good, portable and affordable atlas I would recommend the Pocket Star Atlas as have others here...

 

Lots of choices -- happy hunting!




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