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orion binoview any opinion or actual usage

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#1 highfnum

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 06:40 AM

I thought this was interesting - any news from field use

 

https://www.telescop...word=binoviewer



#2 nicknacknock

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 07:03 AM

Well, first of all, at that price best to buy them from APM in Europe. Export price is EUR  318.49 or more or less US$365 + shipping (say another $30?).



#3 REC

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 01:39 PM

Sky & Telescope had a short write up and said they would be doing a test on them in the near future. Jan issue



#4 denis0007dl

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 01:54 PM

any news from field use

 

https://www.telescop...word=binoviewer

Here you go my review

https://www.cloudyni...eier/?p=8697653


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#5 highfnum

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 03:48 PM

thx

 

appears issues out weigh positives

however may be useful in solar scopes


Edited by highfnum, 19 December 2018 - 05:33 PM.


#6 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:00 PM

well I ordered and got one of these linear binoview for solar scope reasons 

here is my take on it 

 

A) I did a compare with my old trusty burgess optical 1.25  bino

 

1) build seems good and solid as described by denis007cl

here is item in box

 

linear1box.jpg

 

 



#7 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:05 PM

no question it saves back focus with no mag increase

I was able to use it in my Jeagers 5inch F/5 RFT 

and more impressive in my 5.5 F3.9 comet catcher 

that's a first time for both scopes

 

as described image is split in half and that includes out of focus star images (very strange indeed!)

linear2eye.jpg

 

 



#8 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:11 PM

however when properly focused star images seemed normal to me

 

I did not detect any difference in  brightness from left to right side 

to be sure I decided not to use my eyes but a electronic sensor

 

and compared it to burgess bino

 

 

sensor readings are as follows  the smaller the value the brighter the larger the dimmer

 

here is pic of set up with sensor on light board  reading on meter was 0.1

sensoronly.jpg

 

 



#9 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:14 PM

burgess bino gave readings as follows

2.6 Right side

3.0 left side

that does not surprise me since I did not expect a perfect split thru a cubic beamsplitter

here is a  pic

 

burgessleft.jpg

 



#10 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:19 PM

with linear bino view I got value of 4.1 thru both sides no difference

 

so total thru was a bit dimmer but was equally balanced

linearleft.jpg

linearright.jpg

meterreadlinear.jpg

 

 



#11 highfnum

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Posted 29 December 2018 - 07:25 PM

I tried linear with LOA 21's on some star fields and got same nice 3D effect

my guess is because of smaller area that you should not go lower(magnification) than 25mm eyepiece

so in that case burgess is better 

also since linear is a more complicated thing with more surfaces I think burgess would be better on planets

for me thats kind of irrelevant since I use SCT,MCT and long FL refractors that have enough back focus anyway

 

I tried linear on moon with 7 inch MCT and image was quite nice

I did not see any ghost images 

 

but real test for that would be planet venus - that always drives optics crazy with its bright surface 

 

that all for now 

 

I never did get to try it on solar due to clouds


Edited by highfnum, 29 December 2018 - 07:29 PM.

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#12 highfnum

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Posted 31 December 2018 - 07:35 AM

"but real test for that would be planet venus - that always drives optics crazy with its bright surface"

 

my suspicion was correct  I tried venus this morning  (hope to try solar if clouds stay away) 

and there was "ghost echo" 

image of venus itself was bright and sharp but as you panned it 

you can see echo of out  of  focused image come and go

not surprised -  complex lens /mirror combo   that there would be some of this 

there was no unusual difference between left or right side

 

my burgess had much less issue with this(almost none)   (that's a cube/prism design) 

 

I did compare with my old homemade/kit binoviewer  that has cube/mirror design

and there was some echo/ghosting  (could be unwanted mirror reflections)

BTW my homemade bino weighs 13.3 oz   that is less than above models

 

here is image of my kit/homemade must be 25 years ago I did this 

20181231_064131_resized.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 



#13 highfnum

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 11:49 AM

finally got some sun 

I have several solar scopes (LUNT , PST)

hardest one for focus range is PST

 

I used linear bino  

it works fine no ghosts

 

the only limitation is blocking filter in PST is only 5mm with means empty real estate in eyepiece

but that not fault of binoviewer

 

this makes it worth it to me and reason for purchase 

20190101_112008_resized.jpg

 

 

 

 

 



#14 grif 678

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 05:09 PM

I can not say anything about these new ones, but the older model would not work right for me. I could not get the right side to focus with the left side, no matter how much I turned the adjustment. But then I could have had a bad pair. But the WO ones I got later were so much better, and I still use them.



#15 highfnum

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Posted 01 January 2019 - 05:40 PM

I understand 

this thing not perfect but does solve problem of telescopes that are not BV friendly 

for SCT,MCT is use my  BO it simpler 

but for solar scopes that have short in focus 

this works 

 

here is Lunt with linear 

20190101_124658_resized.jpg

 


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#16 Gaudi

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 09:39 AM

Hi aurora. You have experience with the parfocal Tecnosky BV. Maybe you can help me with the following.
I own one and use it with my Dobs on moon, planets, and Deepsky as well. I am very pleased with it.
Now I purchased a second hand Lunt LS60 with B600. For the BV the 6mm blocking filter obviously is to small, similar to your expierence with the PST.
Because of binoviewing is so much preferable for me than mono viewing, I have to purchase a larger BF. I testet different aperture in front of the binoviewer with the moon, and even with 12mm there is still some obstruction, at least with 24mm oculars.
Which BF do you use with the lunt?
Do you think it will be worth directly go for a BF1800 in my case?
Thanks an Regards
Andreas


Edited by Gaudi, 13 December 2019 - 09:42 AM.

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#17 highfnum

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 09:50 AM

I have original b600 and b1200

of course b1200 is more forgiving for area

im happy with it

if you can afford it get 1800

more real estate - simple as that 

luntb1200.jpg

 

 


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#18 Gaudi

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 01:58 PM

I have original b600 and b1200

of course b1200 is more forgiving for area

im happy with it

if you can afford it get 1800

more real estate - simple as that 

attachicon.gifluntb1200.jpg

Thanks a lot. I will wait for the sun, to gather some more experience first. But I tend to go for the BF1800, already.



#19 Eddgie

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:26 PM

There is no performance value at all in going to the BF1200 if you are going to use a parfocal binoviewer.

 

The entire disk of the sun is fully illuminated even in the BF600. I am not sure at all why having more field around the sun would be important because again, even with the B600, the disk and the area around it is 100% illuminated. 

 

Now, if you were using a regular binoviewer where the focuser had to be racked in 30mm or 40mm, then the bigger BF would be necessary to keep the full disk of the sun and a small area around it fully illuminated. 

 

As long as the sun fits into the field  of view in the BF600 and the scope is not used with a configuration that requires a lot of inward focuser travel, then adding a bigger blocking filter does not do anything to improve the performance or brightness.   

 

If you just like having a lot of empty space around the sun though, and are willing to spend the money, then yeah, Ok.  



#20 Eddgie

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 05:33 PM

Here is the math for the above..  

 

In the Lunt 60, the solar disk is only 5.7mm in diameter at the focal plane.   This means that the BF600 has enough to frame the entire disk and enough sky around it to show even the largest proms at 100% illumination. 

 

I can understand the desire to have more space around the sun, I guess, but it is just wasted space really. 

 

Now again, if you were using a conventional binoviewer and needed to rack in 30mm then the BF1200 becomes essential.  For every 8.3mm of inward focuser travel, the fully illuminated field would decrease by 1mm.   That means that with 30mm of inward focuser travel, the fully illuminated circle would only be 2.4mm, so only the center of the disk would be fully illuminated. 

 

Hey, just trying to help you save some money.  I get aesthetics, but the difference in cost would just about pay for the linear binoviewer.



#21 ChrisMax

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Posted 13 December 2019 - 07:14 PM

I just got the Orion Primo Bino and two Meade series 4000 8-24 zooms.  Used my Orion 8 inch f/4 Astrograph to look at the sun and some landscape.  I was really impressed and it's so much better using the bino than a single lens.  Can't wait to use them after dark.




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