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von Kármán - Chang'e-4 touchdown + updates

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#1 John_Moore

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 07:11 AM

China's space agency has successfully landed their Chang'e-4 spacecraft on the Farside of the Moon.

 

Left image: is of surface looking southwards (credit of CNSA), right image: general landing location for now.

 

John Moore

Touchdown1

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Edited by Jayem, 03 January 2019 - 07:13 AM.

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#2 John_Moore

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Posted 03 January 2019 - 12:33 PM

Rover on the surface now...no time wasting here (Image: credit CNSA).

 

Exact location of the lander itself is still being addressed, but guessing that that will be announced soon (LROC site shows the general area before landing, but more refinements of the exact location have since been made). LRO may image the site round end of Jan 2019, but for now it's location, location.

 

This mission rivals both the Russian, the American and other independent efforts seeking to establish a footprint (literally) on the Moon.

 

Btw...the  Chang'e-3 lander (five years ago since launched) was still working before the Chang'e-4 launch, but was powered down so as to not interfere with it.

 

Shutdown of data - due to high temperatures - on the lander and rover may occur over the next few days, so stay tuned.

 

John Moore

RoverDeployed3

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Edited by Jayem, 04 January 2019 - 12:12 PM.

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#3 John_Moore

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 07:58 AM

Next update...a few days time.

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 04 January 2019 - 02:40 PM.


#4 astrochef

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 02:21 PM

So cool to see.  I hope they release images often.

Ty



#5 Magnetic Field

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 08:37 AM

 

China's space agency has successfully landed their Chang'e-4 spacecraft on the Farside of the Moon.

 

Left image: is of surface looking southwards (credit of CNSA), right image: general landing location for now.

 

John Moore

 

click for larger view

 

Adding to this.

 

There is a site called ,,Space News" (https://spacenews.com/segment/news/) with updates and articles relevant to everything space related (mostly US though), e.g.:

 

https://spacenews.co...de-of-the-moon/



#6 Magnetic Field

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 08:45 AM

 


 

This mission rivals both the Russian, the American and other independent efforts seeking to establish a footprint (literally) on the Moon.

 

This is the first ever sign that China has taken a lead in anything. 

 

China is behind 20 or 30 years in terms of developing their own technology and moving away from being seen as the world assembly line without ever being asked for their input (railways, aircrafts, machinery, fundamental basic science etc),  the Chinese government also officially admits it (google is your friend for anyone who does not believe me).

 

One must really congratulate  the Chinese scientists. Quite a feat.



#7 John_Moore

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 11:09 AM

Btw, after the rover moved towards the crater, it did a ~ 180 degree turn on its axis, and most likely will already have taken a pic of the lander, so, hopefully that will be available soon. It will then probably head back doing a recce around the lander (possibly going off to the left) - taking more pics. What direction they will then head after the recce towards is anyone's guess...will they head north? 

 

Have tried to locate where the lander is on the surface using high-rez NAC views, and while one or two spots looked like the background crater and relief, I suspect I'm looking in completely the wrong location, as looking at the before landing vid released, did it look like it was drifting off to the left. If so, then its landed location may be more towards the west a little (as looking down normally on von Kármán with north at top, west on left). One thing's for sure, however, is that the CNSA scientists know exactly where they are, so panoramas please.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 06 January 2019 - 11:33 AM.


#8 John_Moore

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 02:30 AM

To suit slow uploads - a small preview image here -> 6780073

 

A high-rez Panoramic view and a (Round-Me) view.

 

Note, how the rover - previously turned northwards (towards us), but now has turned westwards (south is top)...so is it just taking images, or intending to go in that direction (and that's what is exciting about this mission - the CNSA are exploring the surface from both a lander and rover perspective, and then determining what path, what feature is worth looking at).

azimuth cylindrical panoramas ChangE4 Jan11 2010

click for larger view (credit: CNSA)

 

Descent stage video (YouTube link)

 

Location Jan2019

click for larger view

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 11 January 2019 - 11:41 AM.

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#9 John_Moore

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Posted 12 January 2019 - 05:33 PM

Video of rover moving towards the small crater, and then turning.

 

Apparently, the Rover later went off to the west a little bit (South is up, West to the left in the video), then headed northwards. The Rover, therefore, may well be at the northern sector of the Lander by now, to then take a picture of it (their flag insignia is on the northern end of the Lander, so they might want to, I'll presume, do like they did the same with Chang'e-3).

 

Below, what looks like a shot of the large screen in CNSA HQ (Credit: CGTN)…showing what looks like the current location of the Rover, as taken on 11 Jan 2019 at 16.33 UT. Here, North would be to the top-left of image, South at bottom right.

YuTupath 11Jan2019

 

They have approximately one more earth day to carry out further checks, as both Lander and Rover head into darkness (for some 14 to15 of 24-hour-long earth nights) where temperatures can plunge down to - 175 degrees Celsius. With no sunlight, the solar panels won't be able to continue to power essential equipment, so other power means will be used for keeping some parts warm to survive until the 28 Jan 2019.

 

Below: approximate sleep-mode period (click for larger view)

LunarNightSleepMode
 
John Moore

Edited by Jayem, 13 January 2019 - 04:59 PM.

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#10 John_Moore

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 02:39 PM

Below image: an attempt at trying to identify the features through a 'little planet' view on the horizon from the CNSA panoramas provided (note, all annotations - dots, degrees etc., are one's estimates, so please don't take them as official - they could be wrong).  

 

Btw, using panoramas is quite easy to turn them in to 'little planets' if, say, you have PS or other 'wares (here's a PS example on to how to do so that may also apply to other 'wares non-PS).

 

I don't have the expensiveness of PS, but my cheap-ish 'ware, has hopefully done the same.

Click for larger image

LittlePlanetView
 
John Moore

Edited by Jayem, 15 January 2019 - 10:55 AM.


#11 John_Moore

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 07:51 AM

Seeds and flies on the Moon.

 

Enclosed within a self-contained biosphere onboard the Chang'e-4 Lander, the left image below shows a cotton seed that has sprouted, while at right a graphic shows the setup for the entire biological experiment. It's really an ideal ecosystem, where the plants produce oxygen and food, yeast regulates carbon dioxide and oxygen, while the fruit flies can consume everything through the photosynthesis process. 

 

As power and heat is now at its lowest as the lunar night has begun, the ecosystem will eventually decompose down to organic fundamentals. A similar, self-contained ecosystem on the Earth started at exactly the same time as the moon experiment was activated, where a rapeseed sprouted. Some concern about the possibility of contaminating the Moon, but if that were to occur, the -175 degrees Celsius would likely kill off any survivors. The experiment was really just a first test for the future ones on future missions.

 

Click for larger view (Image credit: Chongqing University)   

Seeds
 
John Moore

Edited by Jayem, 16 January 2019 - 07:52 AM.

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#12 John_Moore

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Posted 06 February 2019 - 04:49 PM

Oblique LROC view of Chang'e-4 site (see link for more). PS. sorry for the repeat in the other thread, so from now on will use this thread for updates. 

 

John Moore

click for larger view (credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University)

 

LROC ObliqueView

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#13 John_Moore

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Posted 11 February 2019 - 06:29 AM

When you think of it, the time that both lander and rover have had to do operations and experiments during its second lunar day stint is relatively short, as powering up a few days after lunar daytime begun and powering down a few days before lunar nighttime begins amounts to some ~7 to 8 days only (and that amount could further be reduced, as they also power down again when the Sun is directly overhead to avoid extreme temperatures that might affect equipment onboard). Both will power down today/tomorrow, and then wake up again round late Feb/Early March 2019.

 

We haven't had any news or images lately from CNSA for the second lunar day, which might imply possible problems, however, according to this Chinese update all seems to be working well - the translation of Chinese to English follows:

 

During the Spring Festival, the No. 4 lander and patrol were stable, the energy was balanced, the working conditions of each system were normal, the data transmission was normal, and the scientific load such as infrared imaging spectrometer and neutral atomic detector successfully carried out scientific exploration activities. The patrol moved to LEO0210 at 2:22 on February 11 and accumulated about 120 meters on the moon.

 

Meanwhile, LRO has been imaging near-overhead shots of both crafts throughout its orbit over the landing area (such overhead shots might be improved during upcoming orbits).

 

Btw, as an aside: India also plans to launch Chandrayaan-2 - (optimistically) expected round mid April 2019, and it, too, will involve a lander and rover.

 

The current location is expected to be between nearside craters Manzinus C and Simpelius N - both of which are near-towards the lunar south pole region. For now, such expectations are hear-say: but being monitored.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 12 February 2019 - 05:53 AM.

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#14 John_Moore

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Posted 17 February 2019 - 11:42 AM

Top image: Shows the IAU, officially-named craters, a mons and the landing site on where Chang'e-4 lander/rover set down.

 

Bottom image: An overhead LROC view of the landing site, showing both lander and rover.

 

John Moore

click images for larger views

NewNamesinVonKarman

 

LROC view Of lander rover

 


Edited by Jayem, 17 February 2019 - 11:43 AM.

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#15 John_Moore

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Posted 28 February 2019 - 05:43 AM

28 Feb 2019: Yutu-2 begins its third lunar day after successfully waking up at 2:51 UTC. All seems to be working well, a return link was established, and exploration of the local area continues. The Lander is set to wake up tomorrow, March 1. Below image shows route map (left-most - credit of Phil Stooke), and the other two images are for general context (credit of LROC).

 

John Moore

click for larger view

RouteMap1

 


Edited by Jayem, 28 February 2019 - 07:34 AM.

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#16 John_Moore

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Posted 03 March 2019 - 09:40 AM

According to the report, the Rover travelled 44.185 metres during the first lunar day, and 75.815 metres during the second day. Below a rough translation of the Chinese article in to English:

 

Look! Master @中国探月工程 I drew a map of my driving route.

On the first day of the moon, I walked 44.185 meters, drifted and took a picture of the four sisters.
In the second day, I walked 75.815 meters and took a photo of the four sisters.

It's not like playing around, testing walking performance is one of my work. In every area I walked, I used the camera to take pictures of the topography, and also analyzed the minerals in the soil and rocks. When the data was transmitted back to Earth, I would show it to you.

Because there is no air, my footprints will be kept on the moon for at least several hundred thousand years along with the footprints of Armstrong, the predecessor @月球车玉兔, and I am a little excited to think about it.

Set a small goal: I want the back of the moon to be filled with my footprints

 

John Moore



#17 John_Moore

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Posted 04 March 2019 - 12:55 PM

Well, looks like the Rover is doing fine, as the below images show it took a photo of a rock (note, the second image on the right is from an IR camera shot). The following text has been translated from Chinese to English using Google translate (so, some leeway in actual meaning).

 

Detecting stones, ruts! Yutu No. 2 has been walking about 127 meters in total. The 着4 Lander and the patrol device are working normally after waking up. The inspector entered the noon at 18:25 on March 3. It is expected that the moonlight will be set at 9:00 on March 10 and at 10:00 on March 13th. During the third month of the month, the patrol device scientifically probed the stones and ruts. The maximum diameter of the detected stone is about 20 cm, and the lunar rover is about 1.2 m away from the stone. #嫦娥四号月背之旅#

 

This rock view may not have been its intended target, but a sort-of-stumbling-upon (they've been others that the Rover encountered), so it might just be a bonus opportunity-of-sorts. Note, the wide angle view in the first view (a consequence of a camera onboard the Rover).

 

John Moore

click for larger view (image credit: CNSA)

Yutu Rock

 


Edited by Jayem, 04 March 2019 - 11:04 PM.


#18 John_Moore

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 04:58 PM

Below, a set of images taken by a camera onboard the Rover. The red-circled rock is what the engineers are aiming for, however, it isn't just a simple drive up to it, so they have to plan possible routes (the red-lined path shown in the bottom-left image might be one, however, they also arrow small craters to avoid getting stuck in). Note also, pointing of the camera has picked up some sunlight effects, and so aren't defects of the camera itself.

 

John Moore

click for larger view

Yutu Stone

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#19 John_Moore

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Posted 11 March 2019 - 06:51 AM

The dates for third lunar night and fourth lunar day for both Lander and Rover are shown in the image below. Note, these dates are for when the terminator is approximately over the landing zone area, but not for when the Lander/Rover goes to sleep or wakes up, which usually involves a day or two before or after the terminator dates shown.

 

John Moore

click for larger view  

LunarNight3

 

 


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#20 John_Moore

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:59 AM

Mapping of craft movements on planets, at detailed level, pose serious challenges for planetary cartographers. Prof. Phil Stooke has simplified this area of science: producing map works at extraordinary detail - the below image is an example of the Yutu 2 Rover route.

 

Btw, according to recent interviews in Chinese, which I have in full from Google-translated English (I only mention this, as links to such degrade over time - apologies), the Rover travelled some ~ 150 metres so far to-date, recorded the lowest-known coldest temperature of -190 Celsius degrees during a lunar night-time (the previously-known temperature was said to have been -180 Celsius degrees), and obtained a geological profile of about 100-200 metres into the surface of the moon.

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: Phil Stooke)

Stooke 2 LunarDaysUpdate

Edited by Jayem, 13 March 2019 - 07:51 AM.

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#21 John_Moore

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 04:26 PM

Latest LROC views of the Lander and Rover on the surface (note the wonderful long shadows of both at its position on 28 Feb 2019). 

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: LROC)

RoverMovement

Edited by Jayem, 20 March 2019 - 04:29 PM.

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#22 John_Moore

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Posted 25 March 2019 - 05:54 AM

Below two more images emerging from the respective sources: The left-most one (credit: CNSA) shows a view of the tracks made by the Rover (it looks like the photo was taken from the fourth green dot location from the start-point, the Lander is on left, so, we're looking southwards approximately); while the right-most one (credit: Beijing Aerospace Flight Control Centre) gives an update on the route taken by the Rover.

 

Btw, the terminator will be approximately over the landing site on ~ March 28, so given it takes a day or two for both 'crafts to wake up, the fourth lunar day for each should begin round 30/31 March.

 

John Moore

click for larger view

BeijingAerospaceFlightControlCentre

Edited by Jayem, 25 March 2019 - 06:07 AM.

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#23 John_Moore

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Posted 30 March 2019 - 04:15 PM

Both the Lander and Rover are now awake again for their fourth lunar day (the Rover was meant for a 3-long lunar day stint) - the rover having travelled some 163 metres todate. Several new images have also been released (some seen in this Nature Geoscience article, which needs a paid subscription to access), the latest below showing close-up of the tracks.

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: CLEP)

TracksCloseup

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#24 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 01 April 2019 - 10:13 AM

Looks a lot like the back of a head with a petzel headlamp on it. They seem to be constructing a Mooncrop Circle. 

 

/s



#25 John_Moore

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Posted 01 April 2019 - 11:51 AM

Mooncrop circles it is, Brian wink.gif From the map in #22 above, it looks like there may be some ~ 20 of these circles across the route so far: presuming, each time the Rover had to turn (green dots etc.,) in a different direction, it likely produced a circle. I've no idea which one represents the close-up track view above is, however, judging from the shadow's viewpoint, it's likely the camera photo was taken when the Rover was looking eastwards, and so well into a time when more than half of a lunar day was through.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 01 April 2019 - 08:00 PM.

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