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von Kármán - Chang'e-4 touchdown + updates

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#26 Jayem

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Posted 28 April 2019 - 04:43 PM

The Yutu2 Rover (believed to have travelled up to 178.9 metres so far) woke up today on 28 April at 5.45 UTC (Lander expected to wake up later round 23.00 UTC) for its fifth lunar day.

 

Images below may have been taken during the fourth lunar day excursion: the first track image is likely a view looking towards the southeast (the Lander would be way to the left); the second image may be hard to pinpoint exactly the area under scrutiny.

 

John Moore

click for larger views (Credit: CLEP)

YuTu2 April28 2
 
YuTu2 April28 1
 

 


Edited by Jayem, 28 April 2019 - 04:47 PM.

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#27 Jayem

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Posted 01 May 2019 - 04:48 PM

Those over at the LROC website posted a Topographic Map of the landing site for Chang'e-4. Of interest are the new, more detailed Lat/Long coordinates for the Lander...now up to four decimal places. Image below is a small preview of the Topographic Map, but better-sized in the link above and, of course, more info., by the Principal Investigator, Prof. Mark Robinson.

 

John Moore

(Credit: NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University)

LROC Topo

Edited by Jayem, 02 May 2019 - 12:28 PM.

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#28 Jayem

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Posted 11 May 2019 - 03:36 PM

Both the Lander and Yutu2 rover today, 11 May 2019, have powered down after their fifth lunar day. Up to 6.6 Gb of data across 494 data files has so far been downloaded to HQ, while the rover travelled 190.66 metres to-date. The top image may be that of von Kármán's southwestern rim. The middle image shows another track image (note, how they go on for some distance - right back to the top right of image). I've tried to judge where exactly this track image was taken, and it seems to be a follow-on view to the track image in #26 - two posts above (see third image below).

 

 

 

John Moore

(Credit: CLEP)

SouthwestRimofVK

 

YuTu2 TracksMore

 

TrackLocations

 


Edited by Jayem, 11 May 2019 - 04:30 PM.

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#29 B l a k S t a r

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 08:07 AM

I think the top photo may encourage the Flat Moon Society. /s

 

great posts. 



#30 Jayem

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 09:32 AM

The flat moon is something I think I'll pass up on Brian wink.gif

 

BTW, the DSLWP-B (Longjiang-2) radio microsatellite (as well as DSLWP-A) launched last year and currently orbiting the Moon is set to impact the Moon (possibly the farside) at the end of July 2019.

 

Both microsatellites initially launched 'piggy-backed' style on-board the Chang'e-4 Relay satellite (a support communications satellite for the main Chang'e-4 mission lander and rover), and while both were set to orbit the Moon, the DSLWP-A (Longjiang-1) had some issues and so remained in earth orbit.

 

More additional information here about the DSLWP-B impact, along with other in-house links.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 13 May 2019 - 01:12 PM.

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#31 t_image

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 10:52 AM

Thanks for all these great updates John!



#32 Jayem

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Posted 13 May 2019 - 11:44 AM

Cheers, t_image...very much appreciated; I find it's nice to stay up-to-date. 

 

There are a couple of more spacecrafts to be launched/crashed to/on the Moon, the earliest is Chandrayaan-II in July...if all goes well.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 13 May 2019 - 05:51 PM.


#33 Jayem

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 03:48 PM

A free Nature article here about 'The Moon's mantle unveiled'...interesting reading.

 

Images below are lunar day 5 views (left, shows a view of the Lander from Yutu2, while right, a nice shadowed effect as Yutu2 woke up on the day).

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: CLEP)

LunarDay5Views

Edited by Jayem, 16 May 2019 - 06:38 AM.

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#34 Greg_74

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 11:02 AM

Hi John, thanks for poinitng to that article, and thanks for fresh news.

 

BTW, how these circles were made on the rover's track?

 

Greg



#35 Jayem

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 11:56 AM

Thanks, Greg...and as for the circle-tracks, which always reminds me of the 'doughnuts' that some bikers do here on our earth roads, this YouTube vid of the rover moving across the surface explains it all (the rover has six wheels, and in the vid you can see how the outer corner set of four wheels produces the 'doughnuts' by turning individually on each of their vertical axes). Note, the vid appears to hang for a second or two at some points, but this was due to pre-cautionary stops for its next movement.

 

And who can blame anyone for these stops, as the engineers wouldn't like to get stuck in something like the small impact feature shown below at left (the right image shows the impact feature in the red circle). Btw, the discolouration in this right-most image is due to reflection effects in to one of Yutu2's cameras - apparently, light reflections off the rover's body set off alarms as it moved across the surface during its autonomously/avoidance drive. The green line shows the rover's path (think, moving from right to left as viewed) - the red mark at left in the right-most image being the location where Yutu2 took the image of the impact feature. 

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: CLEP)

ImpactReflections

Edited by Jayem, 16 May 2019 - 07:00 PM.

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#36 Greg_74

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 12:59 PM

Thanks for this explanation and link, John !

 

It is incredible to see Yutu moving!

 

And this shadows are amazing - this "wave" of shadow's edges of  solar panels and  the "wave" of a light line between shadows of the panels when Yutu passes along some holes and "hills". Hm, maybe something similar to this happens to shadows here, on Earth ?! I must check this someday.

 

Greg



#37 Jayem

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 01:59 PM

Yeah, Greg, you got it in one: just looking at the shadows alone of the Yutu2 views (e.g. how they relate from Yutu2 itself, the Lander, or a particular feature, crater imaged by the rover etc.,), it's possible to figure out what approximate time of the lunar day that they occurred.

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 17 May 2019 - 03:26 AM.


#38 Jayem

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 12:31 PM

Hoping all goes well, both the Chang'e-4 Lander and Yutu2 Rover should start to wake up some time on the 28 May 2019 for their SIXTH LUNAR DAY (Yutu2 normally awakes up at some 20 hours or so before the Lander does).

 

While there are no reports, so far, of any problems with the rover, the distance-travelled stats., (below) show some slowing down (perhaps, not due to any difficulties with the rover itself, but that the engineers are just being more cautious in how they handle the rover as it wears and tears down rolling across the harsh, abrasive, clingy regolith lunar soil).

Day 1: 0 metres

Day 2: 120 metres - that is a difference between Day 1 and Day 2 of             (+120 metres)

Day 3: 163 metres - that is a difference between Day 2 and Day 3 of             (+43 metres)

Day 4: 178.9 metres - that is a difference of between Day 3 and Day 4 of      (+15.9 metres

Day 5: 190.66 metres - that is a difference of between Day 4 and Day 5 of    (+11.76 metres)

 

John Moore


Edited by Jayem, 28 May 2019 - 05:44 AM.

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#39 Jayem

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Posted 10 June 2019 - 05:14 AM

Lunar Day 6: Both the Lander and Yutu2 Rover have now powered down (on 9 June at 14.00 UTC and 15.40 UTC respectively).

 

While the total distance travelled by the rover to-date is now at 212.99 metres, it's as well to note that during the Day 6 activities it roved 22 metres in all (the distances travelled during Day 4 and Day 5 was 15.9 metres and 11.76 metres respectively - 27.66 metres in total, so that may be a good sign the rover is in good shape. Images below: tracks again, while the right-most image shows several various-sized impact craters.

 

John Moore

click for larger view (Credit: CLEP)

YuTu2 Day 6

Edited by Jayem, 10 June 2019 - 05:22 AM.

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#40 Jayem

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 03:48 PM

The top image below shows a series of 10 individually-mapped views taken by the Panoramic Camera (PCAM) onboard the Yutu2 rover over the first three days (red line = day 1 path, blue line = day 2 path, yellow line = day 3 path). PCAM acts as a kind of safety feature for the rover before it moves on to its next site location, planning the best route from the panoramic image taken.  Here's a PDF paper that will explain more. The bottom image is my own attempt to judge the various doughnut points, and images taken therefrom by Yutu2, over the course of its expedition in reference to Phil Stooke's map (at centre). Please note, they could be incorrect, as such doughnut tracks all look the same, so open to correction. That said, it was still a nice exploration exercise to conduct.

 

John Moore

click images for larger views

PCAM views
 
 
DoughnutTracks

 


Edited by Jayem, 20 June 2019 - 01:35 PM.

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